Zimbabwe

What is Zimbabwe known for?


developing world

toward GMO was thought of as "immoral" since it could lead to starvation in the developing world (developing country) or wars, as seen in some famine-threatened African countries (e.g., Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique) that refuse to accept US aid because it contains GM food. 240px thumb right Ghana national football team Ghana (File:Sulley.jpg)'s Sulley Muntari about to take a free kick at the 2008 tournament (2008 African Cup of Nations) The 2000 African

leaders in the developing world" and questioned: "Why so did many Western media outlets, including Canadian ones, send their own correspondents to cover an election in a poor faraway African country of about 13-million black people? The answer is that Mugabe is hated by the British now as he was hated in 1980 when he was elected the first president of free Zimbabwe, after 90 years of British colonization under the name of Rhodesia." Elmasry praised Mugabe for "trying to implement a land reform; to redistribute the land of about 5,000 white farmers to his country's poor black people" and argued that the collapse of Zimbabwe's economy and the rampant inflation are the result of Western sanctions and not because of Mugabe's land seizures. Elmasy criticized the Western Media for not reporting that "Mugabe was and still is popular especially in the rural areas; his land reform has won him support among his own people." WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


abundant food

found among sea eagles only in this and the Madagascar species. or – to distinguish it from the true fish eagle (Ichthyophaga)s (''Ichthyophaga''), the '''African Sea Eagle''' – is a large species of eagle that is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa wherever large bodies of open water occur that have an abundant food supply. It is the national bird (List of national birds) of Zimbabwe and Zambia. Distributing technology Presently the organization is collaborating with like-minded development organizations in an effort to target areas most in need of this sustainable technology. Since finishing the final design of the Universal Nut Sheller, The Full Belly Project has distributed machines in The Bahamas, Uganda, Liberia, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Gambia, Zambia, the Philippines, Haiti, Guyana, India, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Senegal, Guatemala, Tajikistan, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, and Malawi. WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


business research

in the country. Following the granting of the charter by the Government it was renamed to Solusi University to reflect the institution's expanded roles and academic offerings. The university follows American grading and business, research and liberal arts curricular patterns Education in Zimbabwe :: Solusi University . It is owned and run by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In 1999, Denmark took part


retired people

;km) to the north. Shurugwi is one of Zimbabwe's largest producers of chrome; other metals also are mined there. Its healthful climate and scenic location attract tourists and retired people. The largest employers are ZIMASCO, UNKI Mine, a subsidiary of Anglo-American (Anglo American plc) through its platinum wing, Angloplats, the government through education, agriculture and health. Natural resources The town is located on the mineral rich belt, commonly known


term research

. At Olduvai Gorge, Fossey met Leakey and his wife while they were examining the area for hominid fossils. Leakey talked to Fossey about the work of Jane Goodall and the importance of long-term research of the great apes. Although she had broken her ankle while visiting the Leakeys, by October 16, Fossey was staying in Walter Baumgartel's small hotel in Uganda, the Travellers Rest. Baumgartel, an advocate of gorilla conservation, was among the first to see the benefits that tourism could bring to the area, and he introduced Fossey to Kenyan wildlife photographers Joan (Joan Root) and Alan Root. The couple agreed to allow Fossey and Alexander to camp behind their own camp, and it was during these few days that Fossey first encountered wild mountain gorillas. After staying with friends in Rhodesia, Fossey returned home to Louisville to repay her loans. She published three articles in ''The Courier-Journal'' newspaper, detailing her visit to Africa. That relation between money and prices is historically associated with the quantity theory of money. There is strong empirical evidence of a direct relation between long-term price inflation and money-supply growth, at least for rapid increases in the amount of money in the economy. That is, a country such as Zimbabwe which saw rapid increases in its money supply also saw rapid increases in prices (hyperinflation). This is one reason for the reliance on monetary policy as a means of controlling inflation. Milton Friedman (1987). “quantity theory of money”, ''The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics'', v. 4, pp. 15–19. WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


producing projects

2009 06 26 diamonds-rough title Diamonds in the rough, report by Human Rights Watch publisher Hrw.org date 26 June 2009 accessdate 6 June 2012 In terms of carats produced, the Marange field is one of the largest diamond producing projects in the world, "Ranking Of The World's Diamond Mines By Estimated 2013 Production", ''Kitco'', 20 August 2013. estimated to produce 12 million carats in 2014 worth over $350 million. WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


large manufacturing

to the National Railways of Zimbabwe because of its strategic position near Botswana and South Africa. It is the nearest large city to Hwange National Park, Matopo National Park and Victoria Falls. Economy Bulawayo has long been known as the industrial hub of Zimbabwe. It has a large manufacturing presence, and large industries such as Merlin Textiles, Zimbabwe Engineering Company (Zeco), Hubert Davies, Radar Metal Industries, National Blankets, G & D Shoes, Merlin, Tregers Group, Stewarts & Lloyds, Hunyani Holdings, Cold Storage Commission. However some of these companies have either moved operations to Harare or no longer exist altogether which has crippled Bulawayo's economy. The industries are deserted and the infrastructure has since been left to deteriorate, further deterring investors from operating in the city. The reason for the city's de-industrialization has been heralded to be the lack of infrastructure to support the size of the city and its operations and an unreliable source of water and the collapse of the rail infrastructure which was a core reason of placing industry in Bulawayo to begin with. Many locals argue that it is because of marginalisation they experience against the government due to cultural differences between the Shona (Shona people) in Harare and the Ndebele Proper (Northern Ndebele people) in Bulawayo because the National railways of Zimbabwe (Headquarters Bulawayo) is a government parastatal and as such should have been thriving had it not been for embezzlement of allocated funds by company executives who are believed to be Shona (Shona people). The water issue is not new and had brought about the "help a thirsty Matabele" initiative of the 1970s and the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project which would put an end to the water issue in Matabeleland was drafted, however this project was put on hold soon after independence. these allegations have all been labeled hogwash by the relevant authorities, however they have only fueled the secessionist (Mthwakazi) initiative into a general opinion. Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains most of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability including a Thermal Power Station which resumed operations in February 2011 after a capitalisation deal with the Government of Botswana where Bulawayo would supply 45 Megawatts in three years. Like many parts of the country (Zimbabwe), Bulawayo has for the past ten years seen a huge drop in service delivery and an increase in unemployment due to the number of resignations of people seeking better prospects across the border. Many people resorted to farming, mining and the black market for sustenance, while others depended on the little foreign currency that would be sent by family in other countries. However, with the introduction of the multi-currency system in 2009, a new approach is seen by investors in the city who admire the already-available infrastructure and the huge workforce and Bulawayo as great prospects for the future and is set to once again contribute greatly to the economy of Zimbabwe. The city is served by Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo International Airport which has been expanded a number of times to cope with the influx of visitors into the region. The Edgars clothing stores are headquartered in Bulawayo. The Rovos rail run luxury train, Pride of Africa makes a stop in Bulawayo for pick up and dropping off passengers. Bulawayo is situated along the Trans-African Highway network important trade route of Cairo – Cape Town Highway. Most of the city's industries are privately owned, especially in the transport sector. Economy Bulawayo has long been known as the industrial hub of Zimbabwe. It has a large manufacturing presence, and large industries such as Merlin Textiles, Zimbabwe Engineering Company (Zeco), Hubert Davies, Radar Metal Industries, National Blankets, G & D Shoes, Merlin, Tregers Group, Stewarts & Lloyds, Hunyani Holdings, Cold Storage Commission. However some of these companies have either moved operations to Harare or no longer exist altogether which has crippled Bulawayo's economy. The industries are deserted and the infrastructure has since been left to deteriorate, further deterring investors from operating in the city. The reason for the city's de-industrialization has been heralded to be the lack of infrastructure to support the size of the city and its operations and an unreliable source of water and the collapse of the rail infrastructure which was a core reason of placing industry in Bulawayo to begin with. Many locals argue that it is because of marginalisation they experience against the government due to cultural differences between the Shona (Shona people) in Harare and the Ndebele Proper (Northern Ndebele people) in Bulawayo because the National railways of Zimbabwe (Headquarters Bulawayo) is a government parastatal and as such should have been thriving had it not been for embezzlement of allocated funds by company executives who are believed to be Shona (Shona people). The water issue is not new and had brought about the "help a thirsty Matabele" initiative of the 1970s and the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project which would put an end to the water issue in Matabeleland was drafted, however this project was put on hold soon after independence. these allegations have all been labeled hogwash by the relevant authorities, however they have only fueled the secessionist (Mthwakazi) initiative into a general opinion. Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains most of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability including a Thermal Power Station which resumed operations in February 2011 after a capitalisation deal with the Government of Botswana where Bulawayo would supply 45 Megawatts in three years. Like many parts of the country (Zimbabwe), Bulawayo has for the past ten years seen a huge drop in service delivery and an increase in unemployment due to the number of resignations of people seeking better prospects across the border. Many people resorted to farming, mining and the black market for sustenance, while others depended on the little foreign currency that would be sent by family in other countries. However, with the introduction of the multi-currency system in 2009, a new approach is seen by investors in the city who admire the already-available infrastructure and the huge workforce and Bulawayo as great prospects for the future and is set to once again contribute greatly to the economy of Zimbabwe. The city is served by Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo International Airport which has been expanded a number of times to cope with the influx of visitors into the region. The Edgars clothing stores are headquartered in Bulawayo. The Rovos rail run luxury train, Pride of Africa makes a stop in Bulawayo for pick up and dropping off passengers. Bulawayo is situated along the Trans-African Highway network important trade route of Cairo – Cape Town Highway. Most of the city's industries are privately owned, especially in the transport sector. During this period, the Matabele left a trail of destruction in their wake. Peter Becker, ''Path Of Blood'' Cape Town: Penguin Press, 2nd Ed., 1979 From 1837 to 1838, the arrival of Boer settlers drove the Matabele north of the Limpopo. They settled in the area now known as Matabeleland, in present-day southern Zimbabwe. Mzilikazi set up his new capital in Bulawayo. ''Cambridge History of Africa,'' Vol. 5 The AmaNdebele forced the AmaShona of the region northward and forced them to pay tribute. This caused tribal resentment that has continues in modern Zimbabwe. He wasted no time in beginning his new responsibilities. He was called to step in and resolve difficulties between United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young and the British Foreign Office. This was followed by smoothing out American British difficulties over policy toward Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), which helped lead to the end of minority white rule in that country. He reveled in the "good life" of London and took advantage of the range of social occasions from dinner with Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom to quaffing a pint of ale in a working class pub, saying, "Becoming aware of the richness and variety here is a lot of fun." Kabaservice, 450 Guerrilla and army years Following high school, Joseph Kabila followed a military curriculum in Tanzania, then at Makerere University in Uganda. In October 1996, Laurent-Désiré Kabila launched the campaign in Zaire to oust the Mobutu regime. Joseph became the commander of the infamous army of "kadogos" (child soldiers) and played a key role in major battles on the road to Kinshasa. The liberation army received logistical and military support from regional armies from Rwanda, Uganda, Angola and Zimbabwe. Following the AFDL's victory, and Laurent-Désiré Kabila's rise to the presidency, Joseph Kabila went on to get further training at the PLA National Defense University, in Beijing, China (People's Republic of China). There are currently many South African-produced programmes which are shown across Africa and around the world. For example, SABC 3's scifi drama series ''Charlie Jade'', a co-production between the Imaginarium and Canada's CHUM (CHUM Limited), has been broadcast in over 20 countries, including Japan, France, Korea, and in the US on the SciFi Channel. M-Net's soap opera ''Egoli: Place of Gold'', has been shown in 43 African countries, and has even been exported to Venezuela, where it has been dubbed in Spanish (Spanish language). Africa Film & TV 2000 Satisfying local demand The drama series ''Shaka Zulu'', based on the true story of the Zulu warrior King Shaka, was shown around the world in the 1980s, but this was only possible because the SABC had licensed the series to a US distributor. The Zulu-language comedy 'Sgudi 'Snaysi achieved SABC's highest viewing figures in the late 1980s, and was shown in Zimbabwe and Swaziland. * Bossa nova (Bossa Nova (dance)) (Brazilian, see Bossa nova music) * Borrowdale (Borrowdale dance) (Zimbabweean, see Museve music) * Boston (Boston (dance)) '''Limpopo''' ( WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


military team

; and was promoted to brigadier in 1981 to take command of the 6th Armoured Brigade in Germany, his first duty with the British Army of the Rhine. He then took command of a British military team in Zimbabwe in 1983, establishing a working workmanlike relationship with Robert Mugabe in the years after Zimbabwe became independent in 1980, for which he was appointed CBE. Volunteers were recalled in about 1950, with European settlers


played games

on . Much of the population of Botswana is concentrated in the eastern part of the country. * Northernmost point - the tripoint with Zambia and Namibia, Ngamiland District * Easternmost point - the tripoint with South Africa and Zimbabwe, Central District (Central District (Botswana)) * Southernmost point - Bokspits, Kgalagadi District The Lions, and their predecessor teams, have often played games against other nearby countries on tour. For example, they played


work famous

and the Commander of the Second Infantry Brigade. At the time, Ghana had become a one party state, political opposition was effectively removed with the Preventive Detention Act of 1958 and in 1964 Nkrumah declared himself President for Life. Simultaneously

Zimbabwe

'''Zimbabwe''' , officially the '''Republic of Zimbabwe''', is a landlocked country located in southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo (Limpopo River) rivers. It is bordered by South Africa to the south, Botswana to the southwest, Zambia to the northwest and Mozambique to the east. The capital and largest city is Harare.

What is now Zimbabwe was historically the site of many prominent kingdoms and empires, as well as a major route for migration and trade. The present territory was first demarcated by Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company during the 1890s, becoming the self-governing colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1923. In 1965 the conservative white (White people in Zimbabwe) minority government (Minority rule) unilaterally declared independence (Unilateral Declaration of Independence) as Rhodesia. The unrecognized state (List of historical unrecognized states) endured international isolation and a 15-year civil war (Rhodesian Bush War) between the government and black nationalist forces; this culminated in a peace agreement (Lancaster House Agreement) that established universal enfranchisement and ''de jure'' sovereignty in April 1980.

An ethnically diverse country of roughly 13 million people, Zimbabwe has 16 official languages, with English (English language), Shona (Shona language) and Ndebele (Northern Ndebele language) being most common. President (List of Presidents of Zimbabwe) Robert Mugabe is head of state and government, and commander-in-chief of the armed forces (Zimbabwe Defence Forces). Renowned as a champion for the anti-colonial cause, He has held power since 1980: as head of government until 1987, and head of both state and government since then.

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