Yehud Medinata

What is Yehud Medinata known for?


important development

qAMBTNrHBYmlceLa6NUB&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2&ved 0CBgQ6AEwATge#v onepage&q history%20yehud%202008&f false Izaak J. de Hulster, "Iconographic Exegesis and Third Isaiah", pp.136-7 Possibly the single most important development in the post-Exilic period was the promotion and eventual dominance of the idea and practice of Jewish exclusivity, the idea that the Jews (Jew (word)) (meaning followers of the god of Israel and of the law of Moses


culture related" and "x"="x

in the north, Mizpah (Mizpah in Benjamin), Jericho in the east, Jerusalem, Beth-Zur in the west and En-Gedi in the south. James Maxwell Miller and John Haralson Hayes, ''A History of Ancient Israel and Judah'' (1986) ISBN 0-664-21262-X, p.xxi, 425. The administrative centre of the province was Mizpah, and not Jerusalem. On hearing of the appointment, the Jews that had

445 BCE onwards it was once more the main city of Yehud, with walls, a temple (the Second Temple) and other facilities needed to function as a provincial capital, including, from 420 BCE, a local mint striking silver coins. X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client


active local" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client

"VK2fEzruIn0C 2004 pp.240-244" X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period", vol.1 (T&T Clark International, 2004), pp.240-244

9eAdKy4Sm7r13zMpLU2V5ObGou0&hl en&ei _-QETNjQPJmvcPj-nfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBMQ6AEwADgo#v onepage&q lester%20grabbe%202004&f false Christopher B. Hayes, ''Religio-historical Approaches: Monotheism, Morality and Method'', in David L. Petersen, Joel M. LeMon, Kent Harold Richards (eds), "Method Matters: Essays on the Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Honor of David L. Petersen", pp.178-181 The "sons of Yahweh"


major religious

of the kingdom of Israel (Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)), was far more densely populated than Judah itself, and now held both the administrative capital, Mizpah, and the major religious centre of Bethel. Philip R. Davies, ''The Origin of Biblical Israel'' Mizpah continued as the provincial capital for over a century. The position of Jerusalem before the administration moved back from Mizpah is not clear, but from


natural life" and "x"="x

in the north, Mizpah (Mizpah in Benjamin), Jericho in the east, Jerusalem, Beth-Zur in the west and En-Gedi in the south. James Maxwell Miller and John Haralson Hayes, ''A History of Ancient Israel and Judah'' (1986) ISBN 0-664-21262-X, p.xxi, 425. The administrative centre of the province was Mizpah, and not Jerusalem. On hearing of the appointment, the Jews that had

445 BCE onwards it was once more the main city of Yehud, with walls, a temple (the Second Temple) and other facilities needed to function as a provincial capital, including, from 420 BCE, a local mint striking silver coins. X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client


quot people

year (i.e., in 538 BCE) Cyrus the Great decreed that the deportees in Babylon could return to Yehud and rebuild the Temple. where he and Jeshua the priest (Joshua the High Priest), although in fear of the "people of the land", re-instituted sacrifices. ref>

; ) However, in the second year of Darius (Darius the Great) (i.e. 520 BCE), Darius discovered the Decree of Cyrus in the archives and directed

it. He succeeded in doing this, but encountered strong resistance from the "people of the land", the officials of Samaria (the province immediately to the north of Yehud, the former kingdom of Israel (Kingdom of Israel (Samaria))) and other provinces and peoples around Jerusalem. ( ) At this point the Book of Nehemiah abruptly switches back to Ezra, apparently with no change in the chronology, although the year is not specified. The Book


culture related" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client

"VK2fEzruIn0C 2004 pp.240-244" X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period", vol.1 (T&T Clark International, 2004), pp.240-244

9eAdKy4Sm7r13zMpLU2V5ObGou0&hl en&ei _-QETNjQPJmvcPj-nfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBMQ6AEwADgo#v onepage&q lester%20grabbe%202004&f false Christopher B. Hayes, ''Religio-historical Approaches: Monotheism, Morality and Method'', in David L. Petersen, Joel M. LeMon, Kent Harold Richards (eds), "Method Matters: Essays on the Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Honor of David L. Petersen", pp.178-181 The "sons of Yahweh"


treatment history" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client

"VK2fEzruIn0C 2004 pp.240-244" X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period", vol.1 (T&T Clark International, 2004), pp.240-244

9eAdKy4Sm7r13zMpLU2V5ObGou0&hl en&ei _-QETNjQPJmvcPj-nfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBMQ6AEwADgo#v onepage&q lester%20grabbe%202004&f false Christopher B. Hayes, ''Religio-historical Approaches: Monotheism, Morality and Method'', in David L. Petersen, Joel M. LeMon, Kent Harold Richards (eds), "Method Matters: Essays on the Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Honor of David L. Petersen", pp.178-181 The "sons of Yahweh"


hot metal" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client

"VK2fEzruIn0C 2004 pp.240-244" X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period", vol.1 (T&T Clark International, 2004), pp.240-244

9eAdKy4Sm7r13zMpLU2V5ObGou0&hl en&ei _-QETNjQPJmvcPj-nfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBMQ6AEwADgo#v onepage&q lester%20grabbe%202004&f false Christopher B. Hayes, ''Religio-historical Approaches: Monotheism, Morality and Method'', in David L. Petersen, Joel M. LeMon, Kent Harold Richards (eds), "Method Matters: Essays on the Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Honor of David L. Petersen", pp.178-181 The "sons of Yahweh"


work including

original work including Ben Sira, Tobit (Book of Tobit), Judith (Book of Judith), 1 Enoch (Book of Enoch) and, much later, Maccabees (Book of Maccabees). The literature from Ben Sira onwards is increasingly permeated with references to the Hebrew Bible in the present form, suggesting the slow development of the idea of a body of "scripture", in the sense of authoritative writings.

Yehud Medinata

'''Yehud Medinata''' (Aramaic (Aramaic language) for "the province of Judah"), '''Yahud Medin'ta''' '''Yahud Medinsa''', Yehud Medinata article in the Hebrew Language Wikipedia (:he:יהוד מדינתא) or simply '''Yehud''', was an autonomous province of the Persian Achaemenid Empire, roughly equivalent to the older kingdom of Judah but covering a smaller area, within the satrapy of Eber-Nari. The area of Yehud Medinata corresponded to the previous Babylonian province (Yehud (Babylonian province)) with the same name, formed after the fall of the kingdom of Judah to the Neo-Babylonian Empire (c.597 after its conquest of the Mediterranean east coast, and again in 585 6 BCE after suppressing an unsuccessful Judean revolt). Yehud Medinata continued to exist for two centuries, until being incorporated into the Hellenistic empires, following the conquests of Alexander the Great.

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