Yehud Medinata

What is Yehud Medinata known for?


natural life" and "x"="y

* Intertestamental period References External links Maps *x 0&y 0 Yehud Medinata map, CET – Center For Educational technology *

%99%D7%94%D7%95%D7%93%D7%94&str3 &find 1&ex 0&docs 1&pic 1&sites 1&title &all 1&x 0&y 0 Yehud Medinata Border map, CET – Center For Educational technology Books *X&oi book_result&

in the north, Mizpah (Mizpah in Benjamin), Jericho in the east, Jerusalem, Beth-Zur in the west and En-Gedi in the south. James Maxwell Miller and John Haralson Hayes, ''A History of Ancient Israel and Judah'' (1986) ISBN 0-664-21262-X, p.xxi, 425. The administrative centre of the province was Mizpah, and not Jerusalem. On hearing of the appointment, the Jews that had


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) under the Persian Empire image_coat YehudObverse 1.jpg coat Obverse of Jewish Yehud - a silver coin from Persian period flag_p1 Nebukadnessar II.jpg s1 Macedonia (ancient kingdom) flag_s1 Vergina_sun.svg capital Jerusalem latd 31 latm 47 latNS N longd 35 longm 13 longEW E common_languages Aramaic, Hebrew religion Second Temple Judaism event_start Cyrus (Cyrus the Great) invasion of Babylonia event_end

was the standard for Mediterranean trade).q&f false Diane V. Edelman, "The Triumph of Elohim", p.223 In 539 BCE, Babylon fell to the Persians (Achaemenids). (This event is dated securely from non-biblical sources). According to the Bible, in his first

by the scribe-sage (Ezra and the appointed aristocrat-governor (Nehemiah). This new pattern provided the leadership model for Yehud for centuries to come.q&f false Lee I. Levine, Jerusalem: portrait of the city in the second Temple period (538 B.C.E.-70 C.E.), p.42 Administration and demographics Yehud


period amp

&printsec frontcover&dq Lipschitz,+Oded+fall+and+rise&source bl&ots GUAbTs0pn3&sig czGdEbsmEDhAVFJ-BmGsbtQ4xkc&hl en&ei rcUVTLCLM9yvcJ65yPUL&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBQQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q&f false Lipschitz, Oded, "The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem" (Eisenbrauns, 2005) *period&source bl&ots


culture related" and "x"="y

* Intertestamental period References External links Maps *x 0&y 0 Yehud Medinata map, CET – Center For Educational technology *

%99%D7%94%D7%95%D7%93%D7%94&str3 &find 1&ex 0&docs 1&pic 1&sites 1&title &all 1&x 0&y 0 Yehud Medinata Border map, CET – Center For Educational technology Books *X&oi book_result&

in the north, Mizpah (Mizpah in Benjamin), Jericho in the east, Jerusalem, Beth-Zur in the west and En-Gedi in the south. James Maxwell Miller and John Haralson Hayes, ''A History of Ancient Israel and Judah'' (1986) ISBN 0-664-21262-X, p.xxi, 425. The administrative centre of the province was Mizpah, and not Jerusalem. On hearing of the appointment, the Jews that had


small silver

also Yehud Medinata Yehud is mentioned in the Bible in a list of towns in the area ("and Yehud and Bnei Brak and Gat Rimon" - Book of Joshua 19, 45). The Aramaic term Yehud refers to a province under the Persian empire (see Yehud Medinata), in the area of what was roughly the Kingdom of Judah which issued small silver coins (Yehud Coinage) inscribed with the three letters '''Y'''e'''h'''u'''d'''. The actual size of Yehud during this time remains debated by scholars (e.g


important development

qAMBTNrHBYmlceLa6NUB&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2&ved 0CBgQ6AEwATge#v onepage&q history%20yehud%202008&f false Izaak J. de Hulster, "Iconographic Exegesis and Third Isaiah", pp.136-7 Possibly the single most important development in the post-Exilic period was the promotion and eventual dominance of the idea and practice of Jewish exclusivity, the idea that the Jews (Jew (word)) (meaning followers of the god of Israel and of the law of Moses


tradition amp

was the standard for Mediterranean trade).tradition&source gbs_similarbooks_s&cad 1#v onepage&q&f false Diane V. Edelman, "The Triumph of Elohim", p.223 In 539 BCE, Babylon fell to the Persians (Achaemenids). (This event is dated securely from non-biblical sources). According to the Bible, in his first

-kingdom, but this time under descendants of Jehoiachin, who had kept his royal status even in captivity. tradition&source bl&ots flG41pogn0&sig Qz0yXNl7gtiS324vozM7oiCXu2U&hl en&ei e4wLTOizLsqrce_vlbMO&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2&ved 0CBwQ6AEwAQ#v onepage&q&f false Herbert Niehr

Davidic governors of Yehud, a state of affairs that ended only around 500 BCE. tradition&source bl&ots flG41pogn0&sig Qz0yXNl7gtiS324vozM7oiCXu2U&hl en&ei e4wLTOizLsqrce_vlbMO&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2&ved 0CBwQ6AEwAQ#v onepage&q&f false Herbert Niehr, ''Religio-Historical Aspects


period

) under the Persian Empire image_coat YehudObverse 1.jpg coat Obverse of Jewish Yehud - a silver coin from Persian period flag_p1 Nebukadnessar II.jpg s1 Macedonia (ancient kingdom) flag_s1 Vergina_sun.svg capital Jerusalem latd 31 latm 47 latNS N longd 35 longm 13 longEW E common_languages Aramaic, Hebrew religion Second Temple Judaism event_start Cyrus (Cyrus the Great) invasion of Babylonia event_end

of Alexander the Great. Sources and chronology The name Yehud is known from coins (Yehud coinage) unearthed in the region. Archaeological evidence is limited, and a history of the period is dependent almostly entirely on biblical sources (for many of uncertain reliability). There is not complete agreement on the chronology of the Babylonian and Persian periods: the following table is used in this article, but alternative dates for many events are plausible - this is especially true

of both economy and population. Lester L. Grabbe, ''A History of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period - Vol 1: A History of the Persian Province of Judah'' (2004) ISBN 0-567-08998-3, p.28. The former kingdom of Judah then became a Babylonian province, with Gedaliah, a native Judahite but not of the royal Davidic dynasty, as governor (or possibly ruling as a puppet king). According to Miller and Hayes, the province included the towns of Bethel


culture related" and "x"="x

in the north, Mizpah (Mizpah in Benjamin), Jericho in the east, Jerusalem, Beth-Zur in the west and En-Gedi in the south. James Maxwell Miller and John Haralson Hayes, ''A History of Ancient Israel and Judah'' (1986) ISBN 0-664-21262-X, p.xxi, 425. The administrative centre of the province was Mizpah, and not Jerusalem. On hearing of the appointment, the Jews that had

445 BCE onwards it was once more the main city of Yehud, with walls, a temple (the Second Temple) and other facilities needed to function as a provincial capital, including, from 420 BCE, a local mint striking silver coins. X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 2

r1MFLnbJslIMb-atJfIwh2gq-l4&hl en&ei kdUETL68HsG8cY67lfQE&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 4&ved 0CCMQ6AEwAw#v onepage&q&f false Lester L. Grabbe, "A history of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 1", p.30 in contradiction to the biblical account where Zerubbabel's band of returning Israelite exiles alone numbered 42,360. The Persians seem to have experimented with ruling Yehud as a client


early period

Korpel (eds), "The Crisis of Israelite Religion: Transformation of Religious Tradition in Exilic & Post-Exilic Times" (Brill, 1999)p.231 The second and third pillars of the early period of Persian rule in Yehud, copying the pattern of the old Davidic kingdom destroyed by the Babylonians, were the institutions of High Priest and Prophet. Both are described and preserved in the Hebrew Bible in the histories of Ezra-Nehemiah-Chronicles and in the books of Zechariah

Yehud Medinata

'''Yehud Medinata''' (Aramaic (Aramaic language) for "the province of Judah"), '''Yahud Medin'ta''' '''Yahud Medinsa''', Yehud Medinata article in the Hebrew Language Wikipedia (:he:יהוד מדינתא) or simply '''Yehud''', was an autonomous province of the Persian Achaemenid Empire, roughly equivalent to the older kingdom of Judah but covering a smaller area, within the satrapy of Eber-Nari. The area of Yehud Medinata corresponded to the previous Babylonian province (Yehud (Babylonian province)) with the same name, formed after the fall of the kingdom of Judah to the Neo-Babylonian Empire (c.597 after its conquest of the Mediterranean east coast, and again in 585 6 BCE after suppressing an unsuccessful Judean revolt). Yehud Medinata continued to exist for two centuries, until being incorporated into the Hellenistic empires, following the conquests of Alexander the Great.

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