Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan

What is Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan known for?


years making

which Treffle Bonneau served on sought provincial intervention in relation to rural municipal taxation on grazing lands. northwest of Willow Bunch (Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan), Saskatchewan, Canada. Beaupré was the eldest of 20 children born to Gaspard and Florestine (born Piché) Beaupré in the newly-founded parish of Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, Canada, and was the first child to be baptized in the parish. Beaupré did not appear abnormally large at birth, and for the first three years of his life, his growth was relatively normal. However, Edouard's growth rate then increased dramatically, so much so that by age nine he was six feet tall, and by the age of 17 his height was recorded at 7'1". In 1902, Edouard's height was measured at 8 feet 2.5 inches and he weighed over 400 pounds. His death certificate described him as being 8'3" (2.52m) tall and still growing.


Farms

settlement at Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, 1840-1910 ." Prairie Perspective . Regina. p. 9. ) This therefore made selling crops near impossible. The Métis people of Willow Bunch particularly focused on raising livestock, and had farms that housed large herds. The 1890s brought with them a period of great difficulty, as the regions surrounding Willow Bunch were faced with several years of drought. Livestock losses were more sever in 1893, and also contributed to the closure

been and continues as Willow Bunch’s largest industry, with spring wheat, durum, oats, barley, and flax seeing the most consistent production over the last 30 years, since 1982. Among these top five crops, the most productive year over the past 70 was in 1993 when 71.5 bushels per acre of oats were produced. These numbers are gathered from the rural municipality of Willow Bunch, RM 42, an area spanning 1,047.8 square kilometres. As of the 2011 Canadian census, there were 102 farms in the Willow

Bunch area, operated by a total of 125 farmers. The average age of farm operators in the area is 53.4, while the average farmer's age overall in Saskatchewan is 54.2. In the area, there are 16 animal production farms and 86 crop production farms. Along with a sustainable agricultural industry, Willow Bunch has seen


time band

Brochure.jpg thumb Farmfest Brochure Of the six Campagne siblings, Paul, Annette, Michelle and Suzanne reformed as their old-time band, Hart-Rouge. The band performs its ‘80s hits and foot-stomping folk harmonies. The other two family members, Solange and Carmen, join the other four to perform as their previous band, Folle Avoine. The family band sings in French, English, Spanish, and Mi’kmaq. Levesque, Roger, "Celebrating a Giant of a Homecoming; Hart Rouge Returns


years range

in southern Saskatchewan. thumb Points found in Willow Bunch, kept at the Willow Bunch Museum (File:Prehistoric projectile points.JPG) The late years range was from 2,200 years ago to 1690 AD, when the climate became similar to what it is today. Arrowheads used with bows started to be used during this time in hunting. The bison also remained a large resource for people during


including open

, located lignite coal in the area and developed coal mines, including open pit, shaft, and straight cut. Twenty three different mines were in operation during the early to mid-1900s, all with different owners. Frédérick Desjardins’ mine stands out as the longest operating, continuing until the late 1950s. Currently


year based

The highest recorded temperature of all time for the area is 41 °C in 1988. The lowest recorded temperature is −41 °C, which occurred in 1983 and 1994. The Willow Bunch area receives anywhere from 250 to 450 millimetres of precipitation over the course of a year, based on the weather station in nearby Coronach. northwest of Willow Bunch (Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan), Saskatchewan, Canada. Beaupré was the eldest of 20 children born to Gaspard and Florestine (born Piché) Beaupré in the newly-founded parish of Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, Canada, and was the first child to be baptized in the parish. Beaupré did not appear abnormally large at birth, and for the first three years of his life, his growth was relatively normal. However, Edouard's growth rate then increased dramatically, so much so that by age nine he was six feet tall, and by the age of 17 his height was recorded at 7'1". In 1902, Edouard's height was measured at 8 feet 2.5 inches and he weighed over 400 pounds. His death certificate described him as being 8'3" (2.52m) tall and still growing.


famous buildings

renting classroom space, the building went up for sale in 1983. It was to be bought by the town on March 27, 1985 to be the Museum of Willow Bunch. '''The Telegraph Office''' The Telegraph Office is presumably one of the oldest and famous buildings still standing in Willow Bunch. Built in the early 1900s by Jean-Louis Légaré, this building served as the Telegraph Office from 1904 to 1931. The building has acted as a private dwelling and as a Saskatchewan


large role

willows found around Willow Bunch were an important factor in the everyday lives of the Métis. The multifaceted willow played a large role in their wellbeing: :In spring, our women harvested the supple, young shoots to make baskets. Our men fashioned the wood into pipe stems, emergency snowshoes, snares, wooden nails, whistles for the children, beading looms, and frames for stretching hides. Rotted willow wood was used to smoke hides. Green willow branches were burned to smoke meat. We twisted the inner bark fibers into temporary rope, twine and fish nets. We weather proofed rawhide by wrapping it in willow bark. We used willow branches as lathing for our houses. Our men scraped off the inner cambium layer and added other ingredients, such as bearberry, to make a smoking mixture, ‘Kinnikinick (Kinnikinnick)’. We repaired our carts, made a shelter when we were caught in a storm, burned for fuel and had a variety of other practical uses for the wood of the willow. Littlejohn, Catherine, and Ron Rivard . The History of the Metis of Willow Bunch. Saskatoon: Ron Rivard and Catherine Littlejohn, 2003. 193. Print. The Métis found use for the willows in a variety of ways. It was even used as an ingredient for medicinal purposes. Thus, the places where the willows grew were considered a healing place. This is why “the people would settle near clumps of willow and name their community accordingly.” Cuthand, Doug. "Metis played vital role in history: Final Edition ." Leader Post. 16 Feb 2004: B1. Print. The first Métis settlers thumb Métis Pioneers - Willow Bunch Museum (File:Métis Pioneers.jpg) According to Métis oral historians, the Métis peoples’ long history as Hivernants helped with their travels through the Canadian Prairies. Their vast understanding of the Great Plains was an advantage; this knowledge “proved to be invaluable guides as settlement inched their way from east to west.” Clemence, Verne. "History of Metis aims to correct misconceptions: Final Edition ." Star - Phoenix. 27 Mar 2004: E11. Print. Their navigation skills were also an asset to the Northwest Mounted Police. With help from the Métis, the Mounties could get through uncharted territory. Around 1824, the Métis began to move towards Southern Saskatchewan: “As they ventured farther out, they began to set up winter camps and stay year-round. One of the first settlements was at Wood Mountain, which was settled in about 1868-69. But in 1879, fires forced the Métis to move to the eastern slope of the hills to a place known as ‘Talle de Saule.’” Cuthand, Doug. "Metis played vital role in history: Final Edition ." Leader Post. 16 Feb 2004: B1. Print. The Métis settlement in Willow Bunch is one of the first in Saskatchewan. They initially arrived in groups consisting of large extended families; no one journeyed individually. As a result of travelling between communities regularly, the Métis began to intermingle, creating relationships with the different groups of settlers. This gave rise to the growth of the settlement in Willow Bunch. Littlejohn, Catherine, Ron Rivard, et al. "Metis History for Exhibits and Scripts." Historica Foundation. (2002): 3. Print. The majority of the Métis settlers that came to Willow Bunch were partially of First Nations and of French or Scottish descent. These are some of the family names belonging to the first Métis settlers: Bottineau, Bruyere, Caplette, Chartrand, Delorme, Faillant, Gaudry, Gosselin, Klyne, La Fournaise, Lacerte, Langer, Larocque, McGillis, Morin, Ouellette, Pelletier, Piché, Short, and Whitford. thumb Randy Gaudry in front of the Métis hamlet, 2013 (File:Randy Gaudry.jpg) left thumb NHS Profile, Willow Bunch, T, Saskatchewan, 2011 (File:Sheet 2.png) thumb Métis Hamlet in Willow Bunch, 2013 (File:Willow Bunch Métis Hamlet.jpg) The Métis today The town of Willow Bunch is occupied with Francophone and Métis people who settled upon these lands. The history in this small town is very interesting to Saskatchewan. The Métis played an important role in Saskatchewan history. Yet the Métis had fewer advantages in the Francophone town and they had very passive voices. Even today, the Métis are still trying to regain their rights and to educate about the history of the Métis and the roles they played. Just like First Nations peoples, Métis face the same inequality and misconceptions from non-Métis peoples. Willow Bunch is the Rural Municipality #42 in southern Saskatchewan. In 2006, the total Aboriginal population for the RM #42 was 407. Statistics Canada. Census of Canada. Town of Willow Bunch. 2006 The Métis in Willow Bunch “played a key role in maintaining the peace during the time that the Sioux and the other American tribes were forced from the United States into the area of Wood Mountain. Rivard, Ron; Littlejohn, Catherine. "The History of the Metis of Willow Bunch." 2003; Prologue. ” The Métis had a strong relationship with the Sioux, especially with Chief Sitting Bull. “The fires of 1880 on Wood Mountain resulted in the movement of our people to other communities. It was at this time that the Métis pioneers moved to Willow Bunch at the suggestion of Andre Gaudry, (Rivard and Littlejohn) Ibid. ” The Métis were already settled in Willow Bunch when the North West Resistance, led by Louis Riel, battled the Canadian government over land rights. It was in 1885, “the Resistance had an impact on the Métis of Willow Bunch...marked the end of the influence of the Métis on the development of Western Canada. Ibid. ” Within the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan, there are different numbered locals for each area in the province. Willow Bunch is Local #17 with Randy Gaudry as the president. Gaudry has instilled pride in being a Métis within the town of Willow Bunch. Gaudry has been actively involved in fighting for Métis rights for his Local 17. His activism may have stemmed from his late grandfather, Andre Gaudry,one of the eight guiders that took Sioux Chief Sitting Bull back to America due to bad living conditions and starvation. “ They were the guides, scouts, interpreters and security for these trips. Ibid, 143. ” After living away from WIllow Bunch for a time, Gaudry worked hard when he returned to reactivate the Métis Local 17. This meant working between two communities that disconnected years before his return, the Francophone and the Métis. The Local 17 president gathered the two estranged communities to create a dialogue to improve living conditions. “The Francophone community and the Métis community have butted heads for a number of years and there are still problems that have to be ironed out, (noted an article in the Eagle Feather News) Francis, Cherish. The Eagle Feather News. 2008; 14. ” A discussion panel was organized to help build a community connection. Attempts made to improve the lives of the Métis community in Willow Bunch, and to protect cultural artifacts. “SaskPower hired a contractor to construct... and left a right of way to gain access to the construction site and inadvertently drove through one of the teepee rings, damaging it slightly," according to a report in the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix "SaskPower contractor damages historic site".The Star Phoenix. 2010 ” This left the Métis community to act quickly to recover what was left of the damaged site. This action shows the inequality the Métis people faced, which is similar to many First Nations situations when it comes to land reconstruction. Following the 1885 Resistance, many changes occurred for the Métis nation of Willow Bunch. “ They were told that the land property that they settled on didn’t belong to them . It became an issue...as new immigrants arrived they found their identity and culture continually being eroded. Rivard, Ron; Littlejohn, Catherine. "The History of the Metis of Willow Bunch." 229–230. ” The Métis of Willow Bunch still feel the indifference within this small town due to lack of the historical Métis knowledge to the newcomers. “That feeling of inferiority that many of them were taught to feel...That practice of one group being denigrated at the expense of another is still evident today. Ibid. ” The Métis of Willow Bunch will hopefully coexist with the non-Métis community without the idea of superiority over another. Alike to most First Nations situations, the Métis will continue to fight for their rights not only in Willow Bunch but across this nation. The Willow Bunch Métis Local #17 thumb Willow Bunch (File:Metis Local 17.jpg) The Métis Local #17 in Willow Bunch is one of the first Locals established within the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan: “Its mandate is to serve and represent the needs and interests of the Métis people of Willow Bunch and surrounding area, and to coordinate programs and services for the Métis people of this region.” Town of Willow Bunch, n.d. "Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan." Metis Local 17. Web. 11 Nov 2013. . Historical background to 1880 For Saskatchewan, Willow Bunch has the title as one of the oldest settlements established. Founded in 1870 by variety of groups of Métis hunters and settlers, Willow Bunch has strong historical connections with Red River Métis. northwest of Willow Bunch (Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan), Saskatchewan, Canada. Beaupré was the eldest of 20 children born to Gaspard and Florestine (born Piché) Beaupré in the newly-founded parish of Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, Canada, and was the first child to be baptized in the parish. Beaupré did not appear abnormally large at birth, and for the first three years of his life, his growth was relatively normal. However, Edouard's growth rate then increased dramatically, so much so that by age nine he was six feet tall, and by the age of 17 his height was recorded at 7'1". In 1902, Edouard's height was measured at 8 feet 2.5 inches and he weighed over 400 pounds. His death certificate described him as being 8'3" (2.52m) tall and still growing.


fierce opposition

didn’t want another freak show in Willow Bunch or anywhere else.” This argument, however, differs from that of Gibouleau in the same article who claimed, “there was fierce opposition within the university to giving up the body, and pressure from European museums that wanted to buy the body and put it on display.” After more negotiations the university signed an agreement to return Edouard’s remains to his relatives and on September 28, 1989, the body was cremated. The ashes were later brought to Willow Bunch by Gibouleau for burial. The memorial service took place on July 7, 1990. The funeral was held at the same St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church in which he was the first child to be baptized 108 years earlier. That afternoon, the Giant’s ashes were buried in front of a life-sized fiberglass statue dedicated to him at the Willow Bunch Museum. Around 400 people attended the ceremonies, with nearly half of them relatives of the Beaupré family. "Edouard Beaupre: The Willow Bunch Giant", Willow Bunch Museum The Campagne family Another well known family from Willow Bunch is the Campagne family. Michelle, Paul and Suzanne originally formed a musical group named Folle Avoine. Then with sister Annette, they formed the folk music group Hart-Rouge. Their sister Carmen Campagne performed a solo career in the field of music for children. Women of Willow Bunch thumb Willow Bunch Museum Mannequin- Dress Form (File:Willow Bunch Museum Mannequin- Dress Form.jpg) In Willow Bunch there are many women who have made a significant contribution to their community. Groups and organizations Through various groups and organizations that the women of Willow Bunch belong to, they often spend their time volunteering and raising money for charities and community causes. The Legion Ladies Auxiliary #287 was formed June 8, 1974 in Willow Bunch. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 103. Its curling team won first in the Legion auxiliary zone district curling bonspiel in 1982. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 104. The Catholic Women’s League started in October 29, 1963 in Willow Bunch. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 75. The League says it is, “dedicated to serving the needs of the community and increasing the spiritual growth of its members as they work and share together”. Its members raise money doing raffles, teas, bake sales, etc. and then donate to various organizations and charities. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 76. The Federation des Femmes Canadiennes Françaises was originally formed in 1914 in Canada to help soldiers of World War I. It came to Willow Bunch in 1967. Since the war their goal has been to help French Canadian women reach their full potential and to be proud of their heritage as a member of the minority in the community. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 80. They have carried out substantial work for different charities including distributing meals for, “Meals on Wheels”. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 81. The Happy Hobby Club originated at the house of Elizabeth “Beth” Marie Louise Viala in October 1955. They enjoyed themselves meeting on a weekly basis and often worked on projects, which they sold to raise money for charities (such as quilts). They also put on social events in the Community Centre (formerly the Sharon School building). They had annual picnic for members and their families; one year, 100 people were in attendance. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 83. The Kinettes Club of Willow Bunch was formed on January 27, 1978 with Mary Eger as the formation president. Their goal was to help with Kinsmen club projects as well as to start their own projects in order to promote Willow Bunch and stimulate community interest. Their events include Ladies Night Out and the Community Birthday Calendar. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 86. The Convent thumb Willow Bunch Museum Mannequin- Sister (File:Willow Bunch Museum Mannequin- Sister.jpg) The Willow Bunch Convent was operated by the Sisters of the Cross (Sisters of the Cross and Passion). Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 125. It was opened on September 15, 1914 for students and October 1 for the over 40 boarders who would live there. The original Sisters included Emilie St. Joseph, ThaÏsie-Marie, Jeanne Gabrielle, Valérie St. Antoine, St. Clément, Agnés St. Charles, Marie St. Aubin, Emilie, and Eléonore. There were a total of 91 Sisters who served in Willow Bunch until the closing of the school in 1983. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 126. Profiles Cecile Marit has lived in Willow Bunch most of her life. She is now 80 years old. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 835. She was born there, as one of 14 children. Both her parents were originally from Quebec and spoke French. She was a boarder and student at the convent and attended up to Grade 10. Her mother and sister ran a restaurant in town called the White Dove Café. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 835. She and her husband Lorne farmed together outside of Willow Bunch. They had four boys, but one died. When she and her husband retired they moved back to town. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 835. She became a member of the senior citizens board at the senior centre and president of the community choir, which sings at funerals and the Christmas carol festival. Laurette Lesperance has also lived in Willow Bunch her whole life and is 82 years old. She went to the convent until Grade 3 but had to quit then to help her mother raise her siblings. She spoke French her whole life but learned English when she got married at the age of 17. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 813. Her husband, who was her child-hood neighbour, also taught her how to read and write. They had five kids who they raised on their ranch outside of Willow Bunch. They lived on the ranch until 2001, when they sold it and moved into town. Willow Bunch Historical Society, Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, (Willow Bunch: 1998), 814. She is part of the Ladies of the Parish at the Catholic Church. Women in Willow Bunch now Society in Willow Bunch has changed dramatically over time. The school is closed down so children have to attend school in Coronach and Assiniboia. Graduation rates are higher because girls have fewer duties at home and attending school is free. Most women now have employment outside of their homes. Fewer families make a living by farming and people in Willow Bunch often find work in neighbouring towns. Since most of their day is spent outside of Willow Bunch they tend to buy necessary items, such as groceries, elsewhere. This has affected the town greatly and businesses in Willow Bunch have suffered and even shut down because of this change. Mayors and reeves Before Willow Bunch was recognized as a town, village, or rural municipality some members of the community had a meeting to establish government in the area. The first recorded action and meeting was recorded as January 4, 1910. Willow Bunch Historical Society Members at this at Pascal Bonneau Jr., Dr. Arsene Godin, Alphonse Dauphinais, Amedee Beaubien, W. Ineson, James, Hazlett, and A. Saunier. Willow Bunch’s first elections were in December 1911. Treffle Bonneau, O.A. Hainstock, B. Lowman, Alphonse Dauphinais, Peter Kabrud, Joseph Lapointe and Alfred Lalonde were elected the first Reeves. January 1, 1912 Willow Bunch was recognized as a Rural Municipality (R.M.) by the Government of Saskatchewan. The R.M. included Willow Bunch, St. Victor (St. Victor, Saskatchewan), Little Woody and Kantenville. Willow Bunch officially became a village on November 15, 1929. Willow Bunch Historical Society. Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails: A Mosaic of Willow Bunch RM #42 Volume 1. Friesen's Historical Book PV. 1998. p.18. After this, the village nominated its first ‘Overseer,’ Emmanuel Lebel. On October 1, 1960, Willow Bunch was incorporated as a town. At this time, Marcel Ingrand was the Overseer and, as a result, became the town’s first mayor. His major accomplishment as the mayor was being a large role in installing the town’s sewer system. Eugene Lesperance was Willow Bunch’s mayor from 1989 to 1994. Community involvement runs in the family. His niece, Nicole Gellner, was on the town council. She is currently a volunteer at the Willow Bunch Museum. The current mayor is Wayne Joyal. It is his first term as mayor of Willow Bunch. The councillors are Gerald Bellefleur, Jay Drouin, Gisele Fafard and Art Harvey. The current reeve of the Rural Municipality of Willow Bunch are is David Kirby . The councilors for the municipality are Division 1 Denis Bellefleur, Division 2 Real Durand, Division 3 David Marit, Division 4 Trevor Benson, Division 5 Michel Cayer, Division 6 Gerald Delrome Geography Climate and ecology Willow Bunch sits in a small valley in southern Saskatchewan, about 740 metres above sea level. northwest of Willow Bunch (Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan), Saskatchewan, Canada. Beaupré was the eldest of 20 children born to Gaspard and Florestine (born Piché) Beaupré in the newly-founded parish of Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, Canada, and was the first child to be baptized in the parish. Beaupré did not appear abnormally large at birth, and for the first three years of his life, his growth was relatively normal. However, Edouard's growth rate then increased dramatically, so much so that by age nine he was six feet tall, and by the age of 17 his height was recorded at 7'1". In 1902, Edouard's height was measured at 8 feet 2.5 inches and he weighed over 400 pounds. His death certificate described him as being 8'3" (2.52m) tall and still growing.


industry population

. This high price creates great difficulty for new farmers wishing to enter the industry. Population characteristics Located SE of Assiniboia (Assiniboia, Saskatchewan) on Highway 36 Willow Bunch is one of the oldest settled towns in Saskatchewan. McLennan, D. (2005). Willow Bunch. The encyclopedia of Saskatchewan (pp. 1015-1016). Regina: Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina The population of Willow Bunch and municipal area is 361, according

Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan

'''Willow Bunch''' is a small community located in south central Saskatchewan, Canada, southwest of the provincial capital of Regina (Regina, Saskatchewan). The population was 286 at the 2011 census.

Previous names for Willow Bunch have been ''Hart-Rouge'' and ''Talle-de-Saules''. The area has seen influences from Métis (Métis people (Canada)) and Fransaskois.

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