West Island

What is West Island known for?


community cultural

the most division and provincial titles in Quebec Midget Football League (QMFL) history. Points of Interest '''Fritz Farm''', a community cultural centre in Baie-D'Urfé located at 20477 Chemin Lakeshore on a large common green bordering picturesque Lac Saint-Louis (Lake Saint-Louis). Fritz Farm is one of several examples of preserved heritage homes dating back to the 18th century that can be found in Baie-D'Urfé, which are a direct link to the West Island's colonial era. '''Église Sainte-Geneviève (Église Sainte-Geneviève (Montreal))''', a parish church established in 1741 by Antoine Faucon and completed in its present form in 1844. It is located at the intersection of Rue St-Louis and Gouin Boulevard West in the village of Sainte-Geneviève and is part of a larger complex that includes a presbytery and cemetery and a municipal park along the banks of the scenic Rivière des Prairies. '''Saint-Joachim de Pointe-Claire Church & Pointe-Claire Village''', another parish church established in the mid-18th century, though completed only in 1885 in a Gothic-revival style, designed by noted local church architect Victor Bourgeau (:fr:Victor Bourgeau). It is located at 2 Ste-Anne Street in Pointe Claire Village. Permanent settlement in this part of the West Island dates back at least as far as 1710, when the emblematic Pointe-Claire Windmill was completed. The Village features many 19th century and early 20th century buildings and forms an important local small-business sector. There are many restaurants and boutiques in the area, in addition to the exclusive Beaconsfield Golf Club and the Pointe-Claire Curling Club. Othe sites of interest include the '''Pointe-Claire Windmill''' & Summer Retreat of the Congregation Notre Dame. '''Centennial Hall''', in Beaconsfield – a community cultural centre and small-scale performance venue. '''Stewart Hall''', in Pointe-Claire – an art gallery and community cultural centre and small-scale performance venue. '''The Museum of Local History and Heritage''' located at 1850 Lakeshore Drive and adjacent to the large linear parks that stretch from Dorval along the edge of Lac Saint-Louis east towards Old Lachine Village where the old public beaches used to be. There are several marinas in the area and each summer the lake is filled with diverse pleasure craft. Wind-surfing here is quite popular, though public bathing is illegal and generally discouraged. Fishing is popular, though again, it is unwise to consume anything caught. The '''Morgan Arboretum''' and '''Ecomuseum Zoo''', a zoo dedicated to animal species endemic to the Eastern Great Lakes lowland forest, located in one of the last old growth example of the type on-island. The Ecomuseum is, along with Montréal's Biodome and Insectarium, one of the key local public zoological institutions that have found innovative solutions to the problems with 'traditional zoos'. '''Old Saint-Anne's Village and the Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal''', another area in the West Island where permanent settlement dates back to the mid-late 17th century, Sainte-Anne's became a focal point for local services with the development of Macdonald College and the Veterans Hospital during the early 20th century. The Village has many restaurants and bars and other services supporting the comparatively large student population. The area features a boardwalk, the old Rex Theatre and numerous specialty shops. Other features include the Gallipeault Bridge which connects Sainte-Anne's to Ile Perot. The '''Canadian Aviation Heritage Centre''' and the Macdonald Experimental Farm, co-located at McGill's Macdonald Campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. '''Fort Senneville''', originally built in 1671 and destroyed and re-built twice, the Fort was captured and destroyed by Benedict Arnold in 1776 during manœuvres associated with the Battle of The Cedars during the American War of Independence. A commemorative plaque located along Chemin Senneville by the Lake of Two Mountains records the location of the battle associated with the fall of the Fort. All that remains today is part of the windmill which doubled as a watch-tower and the foundations of the seigneurial house, if not some portions of the walls. The site is on private property though the proprietor has been known to allow visitors if they ask politely. '''Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park''' – the largest nature park on the island also features the only remaining public beach and an organic farm. '''Rapides du Cheval Blanc''' Listed as one of the ten Eco-territories of Montreal The Ten Eco-territories The park has a view of the Whitehorse rapids and a wooded area. Parc Nature Des Rapides du Cheval Blanc '''Bois-de-Liesse Nature Park''', the second largest nature park on-island and home to some protected heritage properties. See also *Lac-Saint-Louis (electoral district) *Pierrefonds—Dollard (electoral district) *Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine *Saint-Laurent—Cartierville *LaSalle—Émard * Boroughs of Montreal (Boroughs of Montreal#List of Montreal boroughs) * List of former boroughs of Montreal (Boroughs of Montreal#List of former boroughs) * Districts of Montreal * Municipal reorganization in Quebec References The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


people called

, the West Island contains several wealthy neighbourhoods, parks and historical sites. Prior to 1980, people seldom used the term "The West Island". When referring to the towns that touch Lake Saint-Louis, such as Dorval, Pointe-Claire and Beaconsfield, people called the area the Lakeshore. Whereas in reference to towns that touch Lake of Two Mountains and Rivière-des-Prairies, such as Pierrefonds, Sainte-Geneviève and Roxboro, they called the area


games world

provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the Quebec general


place high

The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


century summer

period in this area. Other important heritage properties include the numerous 19th century summer homes, farm houses and the turn of the century villages in Pointe-Claire, Saint-Anne's or Sainte-Genevieve. A key element of local architecture, as noted by author-historian Jean-Claude Marsan, is that the Habitant house-style of the 17th century proved so reliable, affordable and aesthetically pleasing it was repeated well into the 20th century with few major structural modifications. Houses


special place'

) Riverdale High School  – once one of the largest schools in the West Island (approximately 2,600 students in the early-1970s until the early 1980s), Riverdale's population has declined significantly in the last thirty years, but its still remains a special place in the community of Pierrefonds. An adult education centre now occupies most of the first floor. Saint Thomas High School (St. Thomas High School (Quebec)) – one of the finest public high schools in the West Island, St. Thomas is consistently ranked in the top-ten of Quebec's schools The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


large green

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses


eclectic design

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses


related development

for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec. The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses and cultural sites. As a testimony to its 300-year-old history, residents and visitors alike will discover 18th-century buildings along the former Chemin du Roy, today Gouin Boulevard and Chemin du Bord-du-Lac, in addition to the remnants of Fort Senneville. The shores of Lake Saint-Louis offer a unique setting with café-terrasses, restaurants and boutiques filled with quaint old world charm. The area today is largely middle and upper-middle class residential zoning along with the strip-malls and other services one might expect in a North American mega-suburb. Large tracts were developed in the period 1955–1975 (such as Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Pierrefonds, Roxboro and Kirkland) where the majority of homes are similarly-sized variations of the basic bungalow design, though with traditional Québécois architectural influences. Lots tend to be more or less even in size without much variation across entire cities or boroughs. As such, the West Island tends to give the impression of being a somewhat homogeneous construction. The region is home to the Montréal Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport) (formerly Montreal-Dorval), John Abbott College, Cégep Gérald-Godin, the Macdonald Campus of McGill University, the Fairview Pointe-Claire and Galeries des Sources malls, as well as Montreal's largest park, the Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park. Hospitals include the Veteran's Hospital in Sainte-Anne's and the Lakeshore General Hospital in Pointe-Claire. Municipalities range in character from the modern bedroom communities of Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec) or Dollard-des-Ormeaux to the former cottage-country homes of Dorval, Pointe Claire and Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec), with Senneville and Pierrefonds (Pierrefonds-Roxboro), though sharing a common border, demonstrating the extremes in West Island population density. Other communities, like Roxboro (Roxboro, Quebec), Ste-Genevieve or Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec) have their own particular characters, the latter two sporting the region's two public colleges. Development and the concentration of industrial activity along highways 20, 40 and 15 over the last twenty years has made securing the region's remaining tracts of open land a priority for many West Island residents. Indeed, the West Island is home to one of the last large remaining tracts of Montreal-region wilderness on island. History Pre-Contact, Colonial and Agricultural Eras thumb right Fort Senneville (File:Fort Senneville 1895.jpg) as it appeared in 1895 when photographed by William Notman & Sons The history of human settlement in the West Island of Montréal likely predates European colonization beginning (in earnest) towards the early-mid 17th century, but far too little is known of the history of the St. Lawrence Iroquoians who inhabited the island in the pre-colonial era. Indeed, between Cartier's (Jacques Cartier) first contact in 1535–1536 and the arrival of Champlain in 1608, the local Iroquoians had completely disappeared, most probably from near-constant warfare with other neighbouring Iroquois tribes, particularly the Mohawk (Mohawk nation). The West Island may have had areas of regular human habitation as the history of human settlement in Montreal (History of Montreal) goes back at least as far as 8,000 years. European colonization led to the establishment of parishes and small trading outposts along a Chemin du Roy laid out in the 17th century that corresponds more or less directly with the Gouin & Lakeshore boulevards of today. Lachine, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Sainte-Genevieve and Pointe-Claire developed in a more or less interconnected fashion as colonial outposts spread out along the edge of the island. During the Ancien Regime of the early colonial era, these communities had their own parish churches, many of which still exist. In addition to the churches and rectories, religious orders of various types had set up monasteries and convents, novitiates and the like throughout the West Island, given its proximity to Ville-Marie. Seigneurial system land divisions and the development of the 'montée & rang' main road system allowed for the development of a vast agricultural territory, protected by forts, seigneurial manor houses and the geographic advantages of being on a densely forested island. Though much of the West Island is today a vast low-density modern suburban development, most of the principal roads were developed in the 17th and 18th centuries, inasmuch as land division follows examples common to the Ancien Regime. Moreover, the West Island has a small number of critical 18th century heritage properties, in addition to parish churches, summer villas, windmills and the remnants of Fort Senneville, constituting the principle remnants from the early and middle colonial period in this area. Other important heritage properties include the numerous 19th century summer homes, farm houses and the turn of the century villages in Pointe-Claire, Saint-Anne's or Sainte-Genevieve. A key element of local architecture, as noted by author-historian Jean-Claude Marsan, is that the Habitant house-style of the 17th century proved so reliable, affordable and aesthetically pleasing it was repeated well into the 20th century with few major structural modifications. Houses of this kind can be found throughout the region. Key early settlements leading up to the major post-war suburban developments include: Dorval, founded 1665–1667 as a Sulpician mission, it became a village in 1892, a town in 1903 and a city in 1956. Its development came largely in 1855 when the Grand Trunk Railroad established a station at Dorval, leading the hamlet to develop into a summer retreat for wealthy early-Victorian Era Montreal elites. Later, through the start of the century until the Second World War, the village became a town well known for its beaches on Lac des Deux Montagnes. thumb right Colonel Benedict Arnold (Image:Benedict Arnold 1color.jpg) in 1776, the year he destroyed the fort. Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, first explored and settled between 1663 and 1712, though widely used by Iroquois and Algonquins for hundreds if not thousands of years before contact, due to its strategic importance at the confluence of the Ottawa (Ottawa River) and Saint Lawrence (Saint Lawrence River) rivers and at the Western tip of the Island of Montreal. A mission was established at the present site of the Baie-D'Urfé Yacht Club in 1663, while Fort Senneville was developed beginning in 1671. A post office was established in 1835 while the Saint Anne Canal was established in 1843. Train service on the Grand Trunk began in 1854, and the village was first incorporated a year later. Though the village had been principally oriented on parish activities and agriculture throughout the 19th century, the early 20th century saw the development of Macdonald College in 1907, the creation of Gardenvale and the Harpell Garden City Print Company, an important industrial cooperative, in addition to the Veterans Hospital in 1917. Historical Maps thumb left alt 1700s map of Montreal Island. A map of the Island of Montreal made in the 1700s. The words "Pointe Claire" are visible. (File:CarteIsleMontreal1700.jpg) *Island of Montreal from ville.montreal.qc.ca Map dated 1744. *Map of Henry Whitmer Hopkins from the year 1879 with detailed names. *"Montreal Island and vicinity" 1907, Goad, Chas. E, (Charles Edward). St Remi(Sources), St Jean and St Charles are written on this map. *"...The Island and City of Montreal", A.R. Pinsonault, 1907. From Université de Sherbrooke Biblothèque nationale du Québec *Source geogratis.gc.ca Island of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1916, Stansfield, J *From www.collectionscanada.gc.ca Gordon and Gotch map of Montreal dated 1924. *Experimental Farms Service Canada Department of Agriculture, 1952. Titled "Soil Map of Montreal-Jesus-Bizard Islands" Early 21st century: Merger and Demerger As part of the 2002–2006 municipal reorganization of Montreal, all the cities of the Island of Montreal, including those in the West Island, were merged into the expanded city of Montreal on January 1, 2002. However, following a change of government (Quebec general election, 2003) and a 2004 referendum (Quebec municipal referendums, 2004), the residents of most West Island cities voted for demerger, and were re-constituted effective January 1, 2006. However, they remained part of a new supra-municipal structure: the urban agglomeration of Montreal. Pierrefonds, Roxboro, Sainte-Geneviève and Île-Bizard remained in Montreal, as the boroughs of Pierrefonds-Roxboro and L'Île-Bizard–Sainte-Geneviève, respectively. One argument for amalgamation was that West Islanders enjoyed lower taxes than the old city of Montreal, but still used its theatres, concert halls, and museums. With amalgamation, tax rates were harmonized across the island. In fact, the West Island contains several wealthy neighbourhoods, parks and historical sites. Prior to 1980, people seldom used the term "The West Island". The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.


social cultural

educational, social, cultural, economic, and medical institutions. right thumb Offices of '' The Gazette (Montreal) The Gazette (File:Gazette Montreal.png)'' on Saint Catherine Street in Montreal Quebec has two English-language daily newspapers: the large ''Montreal Gazette (The Gazette (Montreal))'', and the small ''Sherbrooke Record (The Record (Sherbrooke))'', a local newspaper for the Eastern Townships. Many smaller communities in Quebec also have English-language weekly papers, including ''The Equity'' in Shawville (Shawville, Quebec), ''The Pontiac Journal'', a bilingual and bimonthly paper, the ''Stanstead Journal'' in Stanstead (Stanstead, Quebec), ''The First Informer'' in the Magdalen Islands, ''The Gleaner (The Gleaner (Quebec))'' in Huntingdon (Huntingdon, Quebec), the ''Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph'' in Quebec City, ''SPEC (SPEC (newspaper))'' in the Gaspé (Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine) region, the ''West Quebec Post'' in Buckingham (Buckingham, Quebec), the ''Aylmer Bulletin'' in Aylmer (Aylmer, Quebec), the ''Townships Sun'' in Lennoxville, the ''Suburban, Montreal Island's Largest English Weekly'', the ''Chronicle'' and the ''West End Times'' in the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and ''The LowDown to Hull and Back News'' in La Pêche. Montreal also has two English alternative weeklies, ''Hour (Hour Community)'' and ''Mirror (Montreal Mirror)''. '''Senneville''' is a village on the western tip of the Island of Montreal. It is the wealthiest town on the West Island, closely followed by Dollard-des-Ormeaux and Baie D'Urfé (Baie-D'Urfé, Quebec). http: grandquebec.com vie-communautaire senneville The town was merged into the city of Montreal on January 1, 2002, but voted overwhelmingly to demerge on June 20, 2004, and regained its status as an independent town on January 1, 2006. We use English unofficial names for neighbourhoods and regions where these are the most common, such as the Old Port, the Gay Village (Gay Village, Montreal), Chinatown (Chinatown (Montreal)), the McGill Ghetto, the West Island, Little Burgundy, and so forth. Use redirects from French-language names if they exist. Furthermore, the merger was met with so much resistance from residents and politicians of Montreal’s predominantly English-speaking West Island that by 2005 fifteen municipalities had demerged from the city center. After it had reached 1.8 million people, the population of Montreal was reduced to 1.6 million residents. '''Pierrefonds-Roxboro''' is a borough (Boroughs of Montreal) (''arrondissement'') of the city of Montreal. It is composed of the former municipalities of Pierrefonds (Pierrefonds, Quebec) and Roxboro (Roxboro, Quebec), spanning the northern part of the West Island. Besides its land borders with the borough of L'Île-Bizard–Sainte-Geneviève, as well as the boroughs of Saint-Laurent (Saint-Laurent, Quebec) and Ahuntsic-Cartierville to the east, it borders the municipalities of Senneville (Senneville, Quebec), Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec), Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec), and Dollard-des-Ormeaux. Although now merged with the former city of Roxboro, the old Ville de Pierrefonds logo from 1999 is still in use for Pierrefonds-Roxboro, despite now being part of the city of Montreal. - 1987 West Island Andaman & Nicobar Islands style "text-align:right;" 6.4 - After a 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty for the province of Quebec, Galganov founded the Quebec Political Action Committee (QPAC), serving as its president (and only member) until 2000. One of Galganov’s first prominent QPAC activities was to organize a protest at Fairview Pointe-Claire, a shopping mall, in 1996 in the predominantly anglophone West Island of Montreal to protest that retail stores were not placing the maximum amount of English on their commercial signs as allowed under the Charter of the French Language. Montreal Gazette (18 April 1996) Estimated attendance at the protest varied from 500 to 5,000. World Paper (USA) (1 October 1999) Galganov followed up this protest with threatened boycotts of prominent retail stores. He also protested the actions of the Office québécois de la langue française on numerous issues including when language inspectors ordered stores to remove kosher products from their shelves just before Passover because they weren't labelled in the French language. B'Nai Brith Canada (1996) These activities caused a reaction among fringe Quebec nationalist groups, garnering publicity for Galganov. See David Layton-Brown, ''Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs'' (1996), p.137 - Cocos Island Contingency Reception Centre Operational ? ? Sept. 2001 March 2002 ? West Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands - The '''North Shore Lions''' football (Canadian football) organization is currently a member of the QBFL (Quebec Bantam Football League) operating in the West Island of Montreal, Canada. This storied park was founded by Bill Allan in 1967 when the local teams were struggling to find talented kids to play football. Since 1967 this park has taken part in 35+ provincial title games and won 30 of those provincial games. World War II prosperity kept unemployment low. Machine politics, fiscal conservatism and a program of rural electrification consolidated the dominance of the Union Nationale over the province. The government of Maurice Duplessis adopted the current flag of Quebec to replace the Union Jack. It won a landslide victory in the 1948 election (Quebec general election, 1948), leaving the Liberals with only a handful of seats. Until the 1952 election (Quebec general election, 1952), the Liberal delegation to the Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of Quebec) consisted of only a handful of members who came almost entirely from Montreal's West Island. It was not until 1953 that their leader could win a seat in the institution. Conrad Black, Duplessis, ISBN 0-7710-1530-5, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, 1977.

West Island

name West Island settlement_type official_name image_skyline Baie dUrfe QC 2.jpg image_caption Baie-D'Urfé, on the shores of Lake Saint Louis. image_flag imagesize image_shield nickname motto image_map mapsize map_caption image_dot_map dot_mapsize dot_map_caption dot_x dot_y image_map1 map_caption1 mapsize1 200px coordinates_region CA-QC subdivision_type Country subdivision_type1 Province (Provinces and territories of Canada) subdivision_type2 Urban agglomeration (Urban agglomeration (Quebec)) subdivision_name subdivision_name1 subdivision_name2 Montreal leader_title leader_name leader_title1 leader_name1 leader_title2 leader_name2 established_title established_date established_title2 established_date2 area_footnotes area_magnitude 1 E8 area_total_km2 150.11 area_total_sq_mi area_land_km2 area_land_sq_mi area_water_km2 area_water_sq_mi area_water_percent area_urban_km2 area_urban_sq_mi area_metro_km2 area_metro_sq_mi population_as_of 2006 (Canada 2006 Census) population_footnotes population_note population_total 224669 population_density_km2 1496.7 population_density_sq_mi population_metro population_density_metro_km2 population_density_metro_sq_mi population_urban population_blank1_title population_blank1 population_blank2_title population_blank2 timezone Eastern (North American Eastern Time Zone) (EST) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT utc_offset_DST -4 latd 45 latm 27 lats 00 latNS N longd 73 longm 45 longs 00 longEW W elevation_footnotes elevation_m elevation_ft elevation_max_m elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft postal_code_type Postal code span postal_code H8Y to H9X (List of H Postal Codes of Canada) area_code (514) and (438) (Area code 514 438) website footnotes '''The West Island''' (in French, ''l'Ouest de l'île'') is the unofficial name given to the cities, towns and boroughs at the western end of the Island of Montreal, in Quebec, Canada. It is generally considered to consist of the cities of Dorval, Pointe-Claire, Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec), Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec), Baie-D'Urfé (Baie-D'Urfé, Quebec), Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec), the village of Senneville (Senneville, Quebec), and two boroughs of the city of Montreal: Pierrefonds-Roxboro and L'Île-Bizard–Sainte-Geneviève. Furthermore, given the nature of suburban demographic development in Montréal, off-island suburbs towards the west of the island (such as Vaudreuil, Pincourt or Hudson) in addition to outer-ring boroughs of Montréal (such as LaSalle, Lachine and St-Laurent) are often considered part of the West Island. This is in large part due to similarities in personal income, design of the communities, services available (and shared), quality of life and economic engines supporting the population.

Historically, there was a linguistic division of the island of Montreal into French and English 'halves', with Francophones typically inhabiting the eastern portion of the island and Anglophones typically inhabiting the western half. Census shows language changes in the West Island - Commuting - The Westmount Examiner The West Island's population is approximately 234,000 and although the overwhelming majority of its residents are today bilingual if not multi-lingual, (given the cosmopolitan nature of this vast suburban area), anglophones (English-speaking Quebecer) still make up a relative majority of the West Island's population. Given its population, the West Island is of similar same size as Windsor, Kitchener, Longueuil, Saskatoon, Burnaby or Regina. Curiously, as late as the 1960s, the West Island was principally farmland populated by Old World French Canadians, which in turn accounts for the significant Francophone cultural influence in what was arguably the 'most English' part of Québec.

The West Island has a multicultural feel and an at times eclectic design (with modern buildings and classic Québécois country homes side by side), given the history of the area and its complex inter-related development with the City of Montreal. The region boasts large green spaces bordering rivers and lakes, bike trails, nature parks, museums, cross-country ski trails, ecological farms, golf courses and cultural sites. As a testimony to its 300-year-old history, residents and visitors alike will discover 18th-century buildings along the former Chemin du Roy, today Gouin Boulevard and Chemin du Bord-du-Lac, in addition to the remnants of Fort Senneville. The shores of Lake Saint-Louis offer a unique setting with café-terrasses, restaurants and boutiques filled with quaint old world charm. The area today is largely middle and upper-middle class residential zoning along with the strip-malls and other services one might expect in a North American mega-suburb. Large tracts were developed in the period 1955–1975 (such as Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Pierrefonds, Roxboro and Kirkland) where the majority of homes are similarly-sized variations of the basic bungalow design, though with traditional Québécois architectural influences. Lots tend to be more or less even in size without much variation across entire cities or boroughs. As such, the West Island tends to give the impression of being a somewhat homogeneous construction.

The region is home to the Montréal Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport) (formerly Montreal-Dorval), John Abbott College, Cégep Gérald-Godin, the Macdonald Campus of McGill University, the Fairview Pointe-Claire and Galeries des Sources malls, as well as Montreal's largest park, the Cap-Saint-Jacques Nature Park. Hospitals include the Veteran's Hospital in Sainte-Anne's and the Lakeshore General Hospital in Pointe-Claire. Municipalities range in character from the modern bedroom communities of Kirkland (Kirkland, Quebec) or Dollard-des-Ormeaux to the former cottage-country homes of Dorval, Pointe Claire and Beaconsfield (Beaconsfield, Quebec), with Senneville and Pierrefonds (Pierrefonds-Roxboro), though sharing a common border, demonstrating the extremes in West Island population density. Other communities, like Roxboro (Roxboro, Quebec), Ste-Genevieve or Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec) have their own particular characters, the latter two sporting the region's two public colleges. Development and the concentration of industrial activity along highways 20, 40 and 15 over the last twenty years has made securing the region's remaining tracts of open land a priority for many West Island residents. Indeed, the West Island is home to one of the last large remaining tracts of Montreal-region wilderness on island.

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