Waiapu Valley

What is Waiapu Valley known for?


diversity work

. The second largest town, Tikitiki, is the easternmost point on the New Zealand State Highway


title historic

of Hikurangi look down at the blue cod (Parapercis colias) soup, indeed white as the hair of my head). Singing the praises of home — the white layer of fat on top of the soup showed its high caloric value. 19th-century gold prospecting NB: This section is based on text from

an object of ridicule, and, afterwards, was known as “Tommy Poorfellow.”


2022

on the riverbed (Stream bed) of the Waiapu River, making it rise rapidly. The riverbed rose between 1986 and 2007,

and 2006. This erosion threatens the town of Ruatoria, and groynes have been installed in an attempt to divert the river away from the town.


cultural diversity

. The second largest town, Tikitiki, is the easternmost point on the New Zealand State Highway


live+offering

Māori (Māori people) settlement of Waiapu Valley was widespread until the 1880s, while in March 1874 there were only 20 Pākehā living in the area. In 1840, Ngāti Porou extensively cultivated the area around the river. The valley was a place where they could live, offering safe refuge during periods of war, and supplies of fresh water and various species


special nature

" Since they arrived, the many hapū that live alongside the Waiapu River have been responsible for preserving the mauri (life principle or special nature) of the river, and the hapū of the valley act as kaitiakitanga (guardians) of the river and its tributaries. The techniques the iwi use to catch Kahawai at the mouth of the river are unique to that river, and are considered sacred. According to an affidavit of Hapukuniha Te Huakore Karaka, two taniwha were placed in strategic locations in the river to protect the hapū from invading tribes — one near Paoaruku (a locality at Category:Landforms of the Gisborne District Category:Valleys of New Zealand Category:Populated places in New Zealand Category:Populated places in the Gisborne District


water quality

Paikea travelled to New Zealand on the back of a whale, but Ruatapu sent a great flood to kill the survivors in New Zealand, called ''Te Tai a Ruatapu''. Mt. Hikurangi became a refuge for the people from this deluge. The Waiapu River is also of great significance to Ngāti Porou. According to traditional beliefs, they have had an undisturbed relationship with the river since the time of Māui, which serves to unite those who live on either side of it. Ngāti Porou believe that taniwha dwell in and protect the river, in turn protecting the valley and its hapū. Taniwha believed to be in Waiapu River include Kotuwainuku, Kotuwairangi, Ohinewaiapu, and Ngungurutehorowhatu.


title historic'

of Hikurangi look down at the blue cod (Parapercis colias) soup, indeed white as the hair of my head). Singing the praises of home — the white layer of fat on top of the soup showed its high caloric value. 19th-century gold prospecting NB: This section is based on text from

an object of ridicule, and, afterwards, was known as “Tommy Poorfellow.”


creative

postscript , available here at the The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. for conditions of licence, and for licence


large number

publisher Manatū Taonga The population of the valley is centred in Ruatōria (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), though the area contains a large number of small settlements. In the 2006 census, Ruatōria had a population of 756 — down 9.7% since 2001, ref name "

. This water drains into a large number of streams and rivers, which flow to Waiapu River, the main stem in the north-east of the valley. The Waiapu River flows north-east from the joining of the Mata River and the Tapuaeroa River near Ruatōria, and reaches the Pacific Ocean near Rangitukia.

to Taylor as the largest in the region. Just prior to 1840, the pā had approximately 3,000 inhabitants. Many Ngāti Porou hapū still live in the valley, which has a large number of marae. Marae in the Waiapu River valley first Monty last Soutar

Waiapu Valley

'''Waiapu Valley''', also known as the '''Waiapu catchment''', '''Waiapu River valley''' or simply '''Waiapu''', is a valley in the north of the Gisborne Region on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand. It is the catchment area (Drainage basin) for the Waiapu River and its tributaries (Tributary), and covers The Raukūmara Range forms the western side of the valley, with Mount Hikurangi (Mount Hikurangi (Gisborne)) in the central west. The towns of Ruatōria and Tikitiki are in the north-east of the valley.

The vast majority of the catchment area lies within the Waiapu (Waiapu Ward) and Matakaoa wards of the Gisborne District Council, with the southernmost area in the Waikohu (Waikohu Ward) and Uawa ward (Uawa Ward)s.

The area is of immense cultural, spiritual, economic, and traditional significance to the local iwi, Ngāti Porou, and in 2002 approximately 90% of its 2,000 inhabitants were Māori (Māori people).

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017