Württemberg

What is Württemberg known for?


numerous books

and physicians at Remmingsheim (Neustetten) in Württemberg. He became professor of philosophy at Tübingen (University of Tübingen), and wrote numerous books on the history of philosophy. He died in Stuttgart. Surnames were appended according to the officeholder's place of residence, and so the family name varied between ''Schenk von Zell'', ''Schenk von Neuenzell'', ''Schenk von Andeck'', ''Schenk von Erpfingen'' and ''Schenk von Stauffenberg''. By the end of the 15th century the family’s permanent name was Schenk von Stauffenberg, which refers to ''Burg Stauffenberg'', a former castle situated by a small cone-shaped mountain of the same name between the small town of Hechingen and its suburb Rangendingen in Land Württemberg. A tradition in the family also associates it with the Staufen (Hohenstaufen) dynasty. thumb upright Jacques Doriot. (File:Jacques Doriot.jpg) '''Jacques Doriot''' ( '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


years life

at the Natural History Museum, a position he held until 1895. The major work of his life was the eight volume ''Catalogue of Fishes'' (1859–1870, Ray Society). He also worked on the reptiles and amphibians in the Museum collection (Collection (museum)). In 1864 he founded the ''Record of Zoological Literature (The Zoological Record)'' and served as editor (editor in chief) for six years. Life Sigwart was born into a family with a long history of philosophers, theologians and physicians at Remmingsheim (Neustetten) in Württemberg. He became professor of philosophy at Tübingen (University of Tübingen), and wrote numerous books on the history of philosophy. He died in Stuttgart. Surnames were appended according to the officeholder's place of residence, and so the family name varied between ''Schenk von Zell'', ''Schenk von Neuenzell'', ''Schenk von Andeck'', ''Schenk von Erpfingen'' and ''Schenk von Stauffenberg''. By the end of the 15th century the family’s permanent name was Schenk von Stauffenberg, which refers to ''Burg Stauffenberg'', a former castle situated by a small cone-shaped mountain of the same name between the small town of Hechingen and its suburb Rangendingen in Land Württemberg. A tradition in the family also associates it with the Staufen (Hohenstaufen) dynasty. thumb upright Jacques Doriot. (File:Jacques Doriot.jpg) '''Jacques Doriot''' ( '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


regular single

. In the United States, they were first produced in 1873. Bussey, Lewis E., Ed.; ''United States Postal Card Catalog'', United Postal Stationery Society, 2010, 248 pages. A complete and authoritative look at U.S. postal cards. Some of the forms taken by postal cards include the regular single card which may be commemorative (Commemorative stamp) or definitive (Definitive stamp), attached message-reply cards, airmail postal cards, and official postal cards


song written

, Ben Weisman, Kay Twomey and German bandleader Bert Kaempfert, was based on a German folk song by Friedrich Silcher, '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


artistic talent

who became a master in the gymnasium (Gymnasium (Germany)) at Stuttgart. In 1703 Bengel left Stuttgart and entered the University of Tübingen as a student at the ''Tübinger Stift'', where, in his spare time, he devoted himself especially to the works of Aristotle and Spinoza, and, in theology, to those of Philipp Spener (Philipp Jakob Spener), Johann Arndt and August Francke. His knowledge of the metaphysics of Spinoza was such that he was selected by one of the professors to prepare materials for a treatise, ''De Spinosismo'', which was afterwards published. In the 1830 the village of Preston (Preston, Ontario) was a thriving business centre with Jacob Hespeler


architectural projects

. Instead he continued to be given design commissions and was involved in almost all the foremost architectural projects undertaken in Stuttgart to the 1830s (e.g., Katharinenhospital, 1827; Hoftheater, 1833). Among the few Works by Thouret that have been preserved are his schemes for the interior decoration of Weimar Palace (begun 1789) and Ludwigsburg Palace (begun 1805), the theatre (1812) at Ludwigsburg Palace, the assembly hall and pump room (begun 1825) in Bad Cannstatt and the Eberhard baths (begun 1838) in Wildbad. Life and work From 1778 to 1788 he was educated at the Hohe Karlsschule in Stuttgart where he trained as a painter. He then attended the Académie des Beaux-Arts (1789–1790) in Paris and studied architecture in Rome (1791–1797). After returning to Stuttgart, he worked for the court in Württemberg as a designer-draughtsman and decorative painter. An early architectural project was the Gothic Revival church of Hohenheim (1797; re-erected 1803 at Monrepos, Ludwigsburg; ruin since 1940s. With the assistance of Goethe (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe), whom he met in Stuttgart in 1797, Thouret was commissioned to design the décor of the Schloss in Weimar and to renovate the court theatre there (1798–1800). On his return to Stuttgart, Thouret was appointed court architect to Frederick II, Duke of Württemberg (1754–1816), in 1799. He undertook numerous building projects, nearly all in the Neo-classical style (Neoclassicism), in Stuttgart and Ludwigsburg where the dukes had their official residences; these schemes took account of the increasing need for prestigious buildings in Württemberg, following its elevation in 1806 to the Status of a kingdom, with the Duke becoming its first king. As well as renovations to the royal palaces, designs for park furniture and ephemeral festival constructions, several theatre projects were entrusted to Thouret, and he also produced furniture designs for the interior decoration of the palaces. In addition to his work for the Court, Thouret designed many private buildings, especially in Stuttgart (e.g., Wohnhaus Erbe, Königstrasse, 1806; Wohnhaus Kohl, Friedrichstrasse, 1817). After the death of the King in 1816, Thouret was dismissed in 1817 from his post as court architect. He was appointed Professor of architecture, but because of delays in the proposed establishment of a professional academy his potential as a teacher of architecture was never developed. Instead he continued to be given design commissions and was involved in almost all the foremost architectural projects undertaken in Stuttgart to the 1830s (e.g., Katharinenhospital, 1827; Hoftheater, 1833). Among the few Works by Thouret that have been preserved are his schemes for the interior decoration of Weimar Palace (begun 1789) and Ludwigsburg Palace (begun 1805), the theatre (1812) at Ludwigsburg Palace, the assembly hall and pump room (begun 1825) in Bad Cannstatt and the Eberhard baths (begun 1838) in Wildbad. This remained for two years her headquarters. Fontaines, half-charlatan, half-dupe, had introduced into his household a prophetess named Marie Gottliebin Kummer '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


hard white

now known under ''Efraasia'' first came to light after Albert Burrer, ''Hofsteinmetzmeister'' ("Court master stonemason") at Maulbronn, in 1902 began to exploit the ''Weiße Steinbruch'', a quarry near Pfaffenhofen in Württemberg. To reach the layer of hard white sandstone Burrer wanted to use for his building projects a thick overburden of softer marl had to be removed. Many vertebrate fossils proved to be present in it. This stratum


quot wooden

, 2007, within the context of a formal ceremony at the Library of Congress, in Washington, DC. In her remarks, the chancellor stressed that the U.S. contributions to the development of Germany in the postwar period tipped the scales in the decision to turn over the Waldseemüller map to the Library of Congress as a sign of transatlantic affinity and as an indication of the numerous German roots to the United States. "Wooden Heart", created by Fred Wise (songwriter) Fred Wise

, Ben Weisman, Kay Twomey and German bandleader Bert Kaempfert, was based on a German folk song by Friedrich Silcher, , originating from the Rems Valley (Rems) in Württemberg, Southwest Germany. "Wooden Heart" features several lines from the original folk song, written in the German Swabian (Swabian German) dialect, spoken in Württemberg. The Elvis


political articles

-Eighters '' who emigrated to the United States at that time. In the United States, he continued his political activity into the 1850s, maintaining an extensive correspondence with Marx and Engels (Friedrich Engels) and writing and publishing political articles for the German-American community. Benjamin Forgey. 'Red Architect' Adolf Cluss: A Study in Sturdy. http: www.washingtonpost.com wp-dyn content article 2005 09 16 AR2005091601904.html Schneckenburger was born in Talheim (Talheim, Tuttlingen) near Tuttlingen, Württemberg. The younger brother of Matthias Schneckenburger, he was a co-owner of an iron blast furnace company, and his business sent him across the Rhine River to Switzerland. Due to this connection, a first version of his poem was set to music and performed there in 1840 by local musicians. This Bern version is now largely forgotten. Schneckenburger died in Burgdorf (Burgdorf, Switzerland) near Bern. '''Olaf Saile''' (August 27, 1901 - June 29, 1952) was a German (Germany) writer born in Weitingen (Eutingen im Gäu), Württemberg. Saile's principal claim to fame is the historical novel ''Kepler, Roman einer Zeitwende'' first published in German (German language) in Stuttgart in 1938 and many times reprinted. It is an imagined biography of the life and times of the astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler. The novel was translated into English (English language) by James A Galston and published in New York in 1940 by Oskar Piest, under the title ''Troubadour of the Stars''. The novel has occasionally been interpreted as a coded protest against the Nazi régime which Saile had experienced at first hand. Following the banning of the Social Democratic Party (Social Democratic Party (Germany)) by the Nazis, in June 1933 as editor of the newspaper ''Rathenower Zeitung'', during the subsequent wave of arrests Olaf Saile was briefly detained in the Oranienburg Concentration Camp, during which time he was maltreated. His release was apparently secured after a friend and fellow-journalist Käthe Lambert used her journalistic credentials to enter the camp and then to write a report detailing conditions there. They subsequently married. Saile died at the age of 50 and was buried in the Church of St. Bernhardt in Esslingen am Neckar. Käthe Saile is buried alongside her husband. Falkenhayn (Erich von Falkenhayn)'s forces made several probing attacks into the mountain passes held by the Romanian Army to see if there were weaknesses in the Romanian defences. After several weeks, he concentrated his best troops (the elite ''Alpen Korps'') in the south for an attack on the Vulcan Pass. The attack (Battle of Vulcan Pass) was launched on November 10. One of the young officers was the future Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. On November 11, then-Lieutenant Rommel led the Württemberg Mountain Company in the capture of Mount Lescului. The offensive pushed the Romanian defenders back through the mountains and into the plains by November 26. There was already snow covering the mountains and soon operations would have to halt for the winter. Advances by other parts of Falkenhayn's Ninth Army (9th Army (German Empire)) also pushed through the mountains; the Romanian Army was being ground down by the constant battle and their supply situation was becoming critical. * Michałów (Michałów, Pińczów County) (1953) of Poland, which breeds Arabians. *Marbach stud, (1477) also known as Weil-Marbach, Württemberg (present day Germany). Produces Arabians, Black Forest Horses, Haflingers (Haflinger (horse)), and warmbloods. *Yeguada Militar, Spain


producing red

a long history of producing red wines, although from somewhat different varieties than other German wine regions. Today the region of Württemberg is a designation (''Anbaugebiet'') for quality wine in Germany (German wine), Wein.de (German Agricultural Society): Wuerttemberg, read on January 1, 2008 separate from the wine region of Baden (Baden (wine region)). With 11,522 hectares (28,471 acres) under

Württemberg

'''Württemberg''' ( ), formerly known as '''Wirtemberg''' or '''Wurtemberg''', is an area and a former state in southwestern Germany, including parts of the regions Swabia and Franconia.

Its traditional capital was Stuttgart. For short periods of time, the seat of the government was located in Ludwigsburg and Urach. The name of the dynasty and the state originates from a steep Stuttgart hill, close to Stuttgart-Untertürkheim. Now the region is part of the German state (States of Germany) of Baden-Württemberg.

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