Vojvodina

What is Vojvodina known for?


history writing

inscriptions. Later, German and Hungarian language dominated (Hungarian usually on the reverse), scripts in other languages became smaller (see Banknotes of the Austro-Hungarian krone). Although in Slovak (Slovaks), Romanian (Romanians) and Serbian (Serbs) history writing administrative and often repressive Magyarization is usually singled out as the main factor accountable for the dramatic change in the ethnic composition of the Kingdom of Hungary in the 19th century, it should be noted that spontaneous assimilation was also an important factor. In this regard, it must be pointed out that large territories of central and southern Kingdom of Hungary lost their previous, predominantly Magyar population during the numerous wars fought by the Habsburg and Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) empires in the 16th and 17th centuries. These empty lands were repopulated, by administrative measures adopted by the Vienna Court especially during the 18th century, by Hungarians and Slovaks from the northern part of the Kingdom that avoided the devastation (see also Royal Hungary), Swabians, Serbs (Serbs were majority in most southern parts of the Pannonian Plain during Ottoman rule, i.e. before those Habsburg administrative measures), Croats and Romanians. Various ethnic groups lived side by side (this ethnic heterogeneity is preserved until today in certain parts of Vojvodina, Bačka and Banat). After 1867, Hungarian became the lingua franca on this territory in the interaction between ethnic communities, and individuals who were born in mixed marriages between two non-Magyars often grew a full-fledged allegiance to the Hungarian nation. WikiPedia:Vojvodina Dmoz:Regional Europe Serbia Vojvodina


oil works

painting pastels most notably in the years 1943, 1944, and 1949. He then began producing oil works painted in so-called 'subdued colors' from 1945 to 1952, marking the "gray phase" of his work. 1953 is considered to be the turning point in Konjovic's painting style. He works began to be defined by more pure intensive colors and glow, leading to the period dubbed the "coloristic phase." New artistic orientation culminated and was to characterize the works of the "associative phase" (1960-1984). At that time Milan Konjovic engaged himself in the work of the artists' colonies of Vojvodina. In 1985 began the "Byzantine phase" with works treating various themes from Byzantine history. The first post-war national tournament was a hastily organized week-long competition in cup format from September 3 until September 9, 1945. Each federal unit (socialist republic) within FPR Yugoslavia gathered a representative team. There were six teams representing Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), Serbia and Slovenia, one team representing the autonomous region within Serbia, Vojvodina, and the final team being the Yugoslav People's Army (Jugoslovenska Narodna Armija (Yugoslav People's Army)) football team. thumb 250px The steeple of Saint John the Baptist Catholic Church (Image:Prigrevica, Catholic Church 02.jpg) '''Prigrevica''' (Пригревица) is a village located in the Apatin municipality, in the West Bačka District of Serbia. It is situated in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village is located 9 km east from Apatin. Population of Prigrevica counts about 4,781 people (2002 census), mostly ethnic Serbs. WikiPedia:Vojvodina Dmoz:Regional Europe Serbia Vojvodina


music studies

the electronic music studies in Belgrade. He was a pioneer of electronic music in all of the former Yugoslav countries (SFRY), since he mixed and produced a number of celebrated albums of Yugoslav New Wave acts such as Ekatarina Velika, Haustor, Marina Perazić in the course of the 1980s. In 1986, his fusion of electronic music and Yugoslav folk lullabies, ''In The Mooncage'' was awarded the International Fund for Promotion of Culture from UNESCO, which included


SAD

: www.vojvodina.gov.rs en autonomous-province-vojvodina languages_type Country languages languages_sub no capital Novi Sad latd latm latNS longd longm longEW largest_city capital ethnic_groups ethnic_groups_year demonym government_type Autonomous province leader_title1 Prime Minister (President of the Government of Vojvodina) leader_name1 Bojan Pajtić (DS (Democratic Party (Serbia))) legislature

)), is an autonomous province (Autonomous administrative division) of Serbia, located in the northern part of the country, in the Pannonian Plain. Novi Sad is the largest city and administrative center of Vojvodina and the second-largest city in Serbia. Vojvodina has a population of approximately 2 million (approximately 26.88% of Serbia excluding Kosovo and 21.56% including Kosovo (Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija)). It has a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural identity, http

), and Dacian Kingdom of Burebista (1st century BC). thumb left Three golden helmets found near Sirmium, "kept" by 80 Roman legionnaires, Museum of Vojvodina (File:Kasnoanticki slemovi - Muzej Vojvodine.JPG) in Novi Sad During Roman rule, Sirmium (''today's Sremska Mitrovica'') was one of the four capital cities of the Roman Empire and six Roman Emperors were born in this city or in its surroundings. The city was also the capital of several Roman administrative


quot covers

) is a town and municipality located in Serbia. In 2011 the town's total population was 35,701, while Vršac municipality had 51,217 inhabitants. Vršac


producing oil

painting pastels most notably in the years 1943, 1944, and 1949. He then began producing oil works painted in so-called 'subdued colors' from 1945 to 1952, marking the "gray phase" of his work. 1953 is considered to be the turning point in Konjovic's painting style. He works began to be defined by more pure intensive colors and glow, leading to the period dubbed the "coloristic phase." New artistic orientation culminated and was to characterize the works of the "


sports quot

assimilation should be given due weight in any analysis relating to the demographic tendencies of the Kingdom of Hungary in the 19th century. Novi Sad Novi Sad, nicknamed "The City of Sports", is the capital of province of Vojvodina and home to the Spens Sports Center. The six Group D games were played there. The very first competition under the newly formed Yugoslav Basketball League in 1945, drawing parallel to the Yugoslav First League (of football), was more or less a nationwide affirmation of unity. Instead of individual clubs competing in the usual fashion, there were only eight teams. Six representing each state within Yugoslavia, one representing the province of Vojvodina, and the last representing the Yugoslav People's Army. 1804–1867 Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine (Galicia (eastern Europe)), Romania (Transylvania), Serbia (Vojvodina), Italy, Slovenia, Croatia the first unified empire under the Habsburg Monarchy until Hungarian uprisings in 1848 and the Hungarian Compromise of 1867 1867–1918 Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine (Galicia (eastern Europe)), Romania (Transylvania), Serbia (Vojvodina), Italy (Trentino-Alto Adige Südtirol), Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina successor state of the Austrian Empire with Hungarian self government within the Habsburg empire 1905 Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine (Galicia (eastern Europe)), Romania (Transylvania), Serbia (Vojvodina), Italy, Slovenia, Croatia concept brought forth by the Habsburgs in reaction to tensions within the empire of autonomy; the autocratic empire would be changed into a united autonomous country where each nation governed itself with some support from a much weaker Habsburg monarchy right thumb 250px Local community office (Image:Зграда Месне заједнице.jpg) '''Tovariševo''' (Товаришево) is a village in Serbia, in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village has a Serb ethnic majority and its population numbering 3,102 people (2002 census). History Tovariševo is one of the old Serb (Serbs) communities of Vojvodina, first mentioned in 1543, during Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) administration. It administratively was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. In the end of the 17th century, the village was abandoned, but was repopulated in the beginning of the 18th century, during Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) administration. A description from the end of the 18th century (by András Vályi) states that ''"Tovarisova is a Rac (Raci (ethnonym))'' (Serb (Serbs)) ''village in Bács county (Bács-Bodrog County). The landowner is the Royal Hungarian Chamber and the population follows the old faith'' (i.e. Orthodox (Serbian Orthodoxy)). ''The black soil gives wheat, barley and oats, the village has an oak forest and a bad vineyard; it hasn't any water, but after the long autumn rains the soil became sodden; it lacks reed but it has silk-beetles. The nearest market-town is Újvidék ''(Novi Sad)'', where people can earn money from the sale of cattle."'' In 1944, Soviet (Soviet Union) Red Army and Yugoslav partisans expelled Axis troops from the region and village became part of the new socialist Yugoslavia (SFRY). Local German population mostly fled from the area together with defeated German army. Since 1944, the village is part of the autonomous province of Vojvodina, which in 1945 was included into People's Republic of Serbia within Yugoslavia. thumb 250px Map showing all cities and towns in Vojvodina. (Image:Vojvodina gradovi.png) This is a list of cities, towns and villages in Vojvodina, a province of Serbia. File:Serbia1913.png Serbia in 1913. File:Serbia1918.png Serbia in 1918 (27 November - 1 December), following its unification with Syrmia (24 November), Vojvodina (25 November) and the Kingdom of Montenegro (27 November). File:Europe_1914.jpg The Kingdom of Serbia in Europe in 1914. '''Bočar''' (Бочар) is a village located in the Novi Bečej municipality, in the Central Banat District of Serbia. It is situated in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village has a Serb ethnic majority and its population numbering 1,895 people (2002 census). * Rusyn (Rusyn language), or Carpatho-Ruthenian, spoken in Transcarpathia (Carpathian Ruthenia). * Pannonian Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language), or Pannonian-Ruthenian, spoken in Bačka and Syrmia, and an official language of Vojvodina along with Serbian (Serbian language), Hungarian (Hungarian language), Romanian (Romanian language), Slovak (Slovak language), and Croatian (Croatian language). right thumb 250px The Orthodox church (Image:Banatsko Novo Selo Orthodox church.jpg) '''Banatsko Novo Selo''' ( WikiPedia:Vojvodina Dmoz:Regional Europe Serbia Vojvodina


years time

was born in Bačka Topola, in the Serbian province of Vojvodina (then part of Yugoslavia) to ethnic Hungarian (Hungarians in Vojvodina) parents. He started playing the zither at the age of 10. His first contact with the violin was at the age of 12. He has finished the six years of musical school in three years time. Lajkó finished his formal studies and turned towards concerting. ''Biography section'' from the official site ref>


important acts

War II , from 1941 to 1944, the town was occupied by Axis (Axis Powers) troops and was included into the Pavelić's (Ante Pavelić) Independent State of Croatia. In 1944, Šid was liberated by Yugoslav partisans and until April 1945, important acts of the Syrmian Front were fought near the town. The Yugoslav Partisans mined the local Catholic church during the offensive in late 1944. Obnova crkve Presvetog Srca Isusova u Šidu, Slobodna Dalmacija Since 1944, the town is part of Vojvodina, which (from 1945) was an autonomous province of Serbia and Yugoslavia. right thumb 280px Map of Kula municipality (File:Kula mun.png) '''Kula''' (Кула) is a town and municipality in the West Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. The town Kula has a population of 17,973, while the Kula municipality has a population of 43,162. History The region was named after Serbs, who migrated in 1752 to the Russian Empire from the Habsburg Monarchy (mainly from the territory of present-day Vojvodina, a province of modern Serbia, and other areas of the Pannonian Plain, which are today part of Croatia, Romania and Hungary). Russian authorities gave these Serbian settlers a land, which thus acquired its name, New Serbia. *(1.) Ukrainian (Ukrainian language) and Russian (Russian language) names are given in Latin script transliterations. *(2.) These names were brought by Serbs from their old homeland in southern Pannonian Plain. Places with same names are also existing (or existed) in modern-day Serbia (Vojvodina), Croatia, Romania and Hungary. *(3.) Serb settlement of Turiya (Turija) was located in what sources are describing as a nominal Polish (Poland) territory. The border between New Serbia and Poland was, however, often disputed and unstable. Origin of settlement names Places in New Serbia whose names can be also found in the territory of the Pannonian Plain (mostly in Vojvodina and Pomorišje) include: *Sombor (Dikivka), named after Sombor in Vojvodina, Serbia Subsequently, in "''The Great Brain Robbery''", Kasnia had apparently reunified and joined the European Union, adopting the Euro as its official currency. The Secret Society (Secret Society of Super Villians) attempted to steal a shipment of Euros as they were being transported into the country. ''Justice League Unlimited: The Great Brain Robbery'' Recap - TV.com In the same episode, a location in Kasnia is listed at the coordinates 45°9'8" N, 19°58'13" E. This would seem to locate the nation in the autonomous region of Vojvodina, Serbia (Vojvodina), in northern Serbia. Google Maps The second coordinate is unclear: although it appears to be 19°58'13", the 8 is obscured and the E does not actually appear; however, if one assumes it to be "West", the coordinates point to the middle of the Atlantic (Atlantic Ocean). Google Maps thumb right Map of the Banovina of Croatia (File:BanHrvatska1939.gif). Amid rising ethnic tensions between Croats and Serbs in the 1930s, an autonomous Greater Croatia within Yugoslavia, called the Banovina of Croatia was peacefully negotiated in the Yugoslav parliament in the Cvetković–Maček Agreement of 1939. Croatia was united into a single territorial unit and was provided territories of parts of present-day Vojvodina, and both Posavina and southern parts of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. WikiPedia:Vojvodina Dmoz:Regional Europe Serbia Vojvodina


life years

writer. WikiPedia:Vojvodina Dmoz:Regional Europe Serbia Vojvodina

Vojvodina

'''Vojvodina''', officially the '''Autonomous Province of Vojvodina''' ( (see Names in other languages (#Name))), is an autonomous province (Autonomous administrative division) of Serbia, located in the northern part of the country, in the Pannonian Plain. Novi Sad is the largest city and administrative center of Vojvodina and the second-largest city in Serbia. Vojvodina has a population of approximately 2 million (approximately 26.88% of Serbia excluding Kosovo and 21.56% including Kosovo (Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija)). It has a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural identity, http: www.vojvodina.gov.rs index.php?option com_content&task view&id 174&Itemid 83 there are more than 26 ethnic groups in the province, http: www.arhiva.serbia.gov.rs cms view.php 1045.print.html http: www.vip.org.rs index.aspx?tabId 62&menutabid 10 which has six official languages. http: www.bgcentar.org.rs index.php?option com_phocadownload&view category&id 22:podzakonska-akta&download 250:statut-autonomne-pokrajine-vojvodine&Itemid 54 http: www.viplc-backatopola.com invenve.html

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017