Vidin

What is Vidin known for?


good coverage

it will resume broadcasting. A powerful FM transmitter on 88.2 MHz provides good coverage for Hristo Botev radio. Only 1224 kHz Radio Bulgaria remains atm. For the transmission on 1224 kHz four guyed masts, insulated against ground, which are each equipped with a cage antenna are used, which allows a switchable directional pattern. Honour Vidin Heights on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica is named after Vidin. Gallery


military commercial

, the diseases, and famine. Since then, Vidin has been an important military commercial and transport center for 200 years. There are many landmarks that exhibit the glorious past of Vidin: Baba Vida castle, the Vidin Synagogue (deserted after Jewish emigration to Israel), St. Petka church, the Osman Pazvantoglue mosque and library (built by the late Turkish ruler of northwestern Bulgaria in the 18th century), the Krastata Kazarma and St. Dimitar church. Understand Vidin is currently the poorest city


national record

* Starting in May 2010, records were being set. On 26 May, at Mohenjo-daro, Sindh province in Pakistan a national record high temperature of , Sandanski, Bulgaria hitting


natural defense

Africa ", Cornwall, Great Britain 1996, pp.102-103 '''TURAN''': Founded on 6.5.1928 in Vidin, Turan was a channel for the Union of Turkish Youth Communities in Bulgaria. The newspaper was also printed in Kardzhali and Varna until it was closed in 1934. The Belogradchik Rocks are a major tourist destination in northwest Bulgaria, along with the town of Belogradchik and the Belogradchik Fortress, which incorporates the rocks as part of its natural defense


popular films

people attend. *Cinema “Nikra”: The cinema is in the center of the city. Every Thursday, there is a film shown. Its capacity is about 400 people. Since films are not shown often, they tend to be the most popular films, and have high attendance. Tickets are 5 lv. *Danube River Park: Vidin has a great Danube Park, a favorite spot for the locals to relax. During a hot summer day, you can take a walk along the park, which is lined with tall trees that provide shade. There are many cafes where you can


impressive rock

and library, the late 18th-century Turkish ruler of north-western Bulgaria, the Krastata Kazarma of 1798, and a number of old Renaissance buildings. Another tourist attraction in the Vidin area is the town of Belogradchik, famous for its unique and impressive rock formations, the Belogradchik Rocks and the medieval Belogradchik Fortress and also the nearby Magura Cave with its beautiful prehistoric cave paintings. Transportation File:Most-Vidin.jpg thumb Danube


bringing attention

the Ottomans to take a stand against Russia after bringing attention to the anti-Ottoman conspiracy (Conspiracy (political)) in Wallachia (Principality of Wallachia), formed around Prince (List of rulers of Wallachia) Constantine Ypsilantis, as well as to the suspicious policies of Moldavia (Principality of Moldova)'s Prince (List of rulers of Moldavia) Alexander Mourousis. Neagu Djuvara, ''Între Orient şi


976

in the period from the 10th to the 14th century. In the Middle Ages Vidin used to be an important Bulgarian city, a bishop seat and capital of a large province. Between 971 and 976 the town was the center of Samuil (Samuil of Bulgaria)'s possessions while his brothers ruled to the south. In 1003 Vidin was seized by Basil II after an eight-month siege because of the betrayal of the local bishop. Its importance once again rose during the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185–1422) and its '' Despot

Province merged with the provinces of Vidin and Niš in 1864 and became Danube Province (Danube Province, Ottoman Empire) in 1864. Silistra was downgraded to a ''kaza'' centre in Ruse (Ruse, Bulgaria) district in this province in the same year. When the Byzantine emperor Basil II ascended the throne in 976, he made the destruction of independent Bulgaria his first ambition. Opposing him were the Western Bulgarians, now led by Samuel of Bulgaria. Basil II's first campaign

the Byzantines was headed by the Comitopuli brothers. By 976, the fourth brother, Samuil (Samuil of Bulgaria) concentrated all power in his hands after the deaths of his eldest brother. When the rightful heir to the throne, Roman (Roman of Bulgaria), escaped from captivity in Constantinople, he was recognized as Emperor by Samuil in Vidin Prokić, p. 28 and the later remained the chief commander of the Bulgarian army. A brilliant general and good politician, he managed


Basil

in the period from the 10th to the 14th century. In the Middle Ages Vidin used to be an important Bulgarian city, a bishop seat and capital of a large province. Between 971 and 976 the town was the center of Samuil (Samuil of Bulgaria)'s possessions while his brothers ruled to the south. In 1003 Vidin was seized by Basil II after an eight-month siege because of the betrayal of the local bishop. Its importance once again rose during the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185–1422) and its '' Despot

of 80,000 strong, led by Mezid the Bey of Vidin, near Sibiu. From 1000, Basil II was free to focus on a war of outright conquest against Bulgaria, a war he prosecuted with grinding persistence and strategic insight. In 1000 the Byzantine generals Nikephoros Xiphias and Theodorokan took the old Bulgarian capital of Great Preslav (Preslav), and the towns of Lesser Preslav and Pliskova. John Skylitzes:The Year 6508 In 1001 Basil

himself, his army operating from Thessalonica, was able to regain control of Vodena, Verrhoia and Servia. Finlay, p. 442 The following year Basil based his army in Philippopolis and occupied the length of the military road from the western Haemus Mountains to the Danube, thereby cutting off Samuel's communications between his Macedonian heartland and Moesia. Following up this success he laid siege to Vidin, which eventually fell following a prolonged resistance. ref>


population made

for Mehmed's return to Rumelia. In 1919, the area corresponded to the following parts of the Bulgarian ''okrugs'': Kyustendil, 661 km², Tzaribrod 418 km², Tran (Tran, Bulgaria) 278 km², Kula (Kula, Bulgaria) 172 km² and Vidin 17 km². Bulgarian sources claim that the Bulgarian population made 98% of the population in Bosilegrad and 95% of the population in Tzaribrod at the time. In the Yugoslav census of 1931, all South

Vidin

'''Vidin''' ( , archaically spelled as ''Widdin'' in English) is a port town (List of cities and towns in Bulgaria) on the southern bank of the Danube in north-western Bulgaria. It is close to the borders with Romania and Serbia, and is also the administrative centre of Vidin Province, as well as of the Metropolitan of Vidin (since 870).

An agricultural and trade centre, Vidin has a fertile hinterland renowned for its wines.

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