Veliky Ustyug

What is Veliky Ustyug known for?


quot news'

.php Putin_and_his_deputy_show_off_Russian_Christmas_traditions The Russian language website (a language not currently offered by the competing NORAD Tracks Santa) includes these features: "real-time tracking" of Ded Moroz, "news" of Ded Moroz throughout the year, a form to send e-mail to Ded Moroz, photos, videos, streaming audio of Russian songs, poems and verses from children's letters to Ded Moroz, information on Veliky Ustyug in Vologda Oblast (considered to be Ded Moroz's hometown) and opportunities to enter competitions and win prizes.


big collection

-Arkhangelsky Monastery. In 1918 it was transformed into the Museum of the Northern Dvina Culture. Between 1924 and 1938 the museum director was Nikolay Bekryashev, an artist, who devoted his energy to extending the museum to the old buildings, mostly churches, of the town, which thus were saved from destruction. In particular, a big collection of icons and objects of applied arts survived. Despite the efforts of Bekryashev and other museum employees, some of the buildings were destroyed


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such as Veliky Ustyug, Totma, Solvychegodsk, and Kholmogory, are located in the river basin of the Northern Dvina. The Northern Dvina basin is roughly T-shaped. The basin of long). The combined stream flows northwest into the White Sea, which it joins near the city of Archangelsk. Looking more closely, the Sukhona flows east and meets the north

Ust-Kubinsky , Sokolsky (Sokolsky District, Vologda Oblast), Mezhdurechensky (Mezhdurechensky District, Vologda Oblast), Totemsky (Totemsky District), Tarnogsky (Tarnogsky District), Nyuksensky (Nyuksensky District), and Velikoustyugsky Districts of Vologda Oblast in Russia. It is . The Sukhona joins the Yug (Yug River) near the town of Veliky Ustyug, forming the Northern Dvina River


humorous short

on the main roads. He is known for his series of humorous short stories about Veliky Gusliar, a Russian town that attracts all kinds of aliens and supernatural beings. This fictional city is based on a real Veliky Ustyug city. Another well known series of Bulychev's stories are young adult stories about Alisa Seleznyova, a young girl from the future. A number of them were made into films, with ''Guest from the Future'' ("Гостья из будущего"), based on Bulychev's novel


history quot

connecting Novgorod with the White Sea. Clashes between Novgorod and Ustyug became regular, especially throughout the whole 14th century. In 1328, Ustyug was annexed by the Grand Duchy of Moscow. The town was not immediately affected by the Mongol invasion of Rus

' in the 13th century; however, its rapid growth in the second half of the century was due to influx of refugees from Central Russia. In the 15th century, Veliky Ustyug became notable for the war between Vasily II of Moscow and his cousin Dmitry Shemyaka, which left Northern Russia deserted. Shemyaka took Veliky Ustyug in 1450, drowned in the Sukhona those citizens who refused to accept him as a prince, and made the town his residence for two years, until he was driven off by the forces of Vasily. In the 15th century, the town had a great military importance and became the base for the operations against the Finno-Ugric peoples. In 1613, during the Time of Troubles, Veliky Ustyug was besieged by Polish troops but never taken. Located at the junction of important trade routes, the town turned into a significant commercial and industrial center in the 16th and 17th centuries. Veliky Ustyug area was the birthplace of the explorers Semyon Dezhnyov, Yerofey Khabarov, Vladimir Atlasov, and of St. Stephen of Perm. Veliky Ustyug lost its key role as a river port with the diminishing importance of the Sukhona River route for trade between China and western Europe, which started with the foundation of Saint-Petersburg in 1703, whereby the trade was diverted to the Baltic Sea. The 16th and 17th centuries were also the time of the highest rise of the culture in Veliky Ustyug, in which the town acquired a national-wide significance. The town is known for its remarkable handicrafts, such as silver filigree, birch bark fretwork, decorative copper binding, and niello. The town developed a distinct manner of icon painting, Ustyug icon painting. In the 17th century, Veliky Ustyug was a major producer of tiles, which are still visible on many Ustyug churches and also were sold to neighboring towns of the Russian North. On January 25, 1613, the town was unsuccessfully besieged by Polish-Lithuanian vagabonds (see Lisowczycy) led by Jakub Jacki. In the course of the administrative reform (administrative divisions of Russia in 1708–1710) carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Veliky Ustyug was explicitly mentioned as one of the twenty towns included into Archangelgorod Governorate. From 1719, it was the center of Ustyug Province, one of the four provinces of the Governorate. In 1780, the governorate was abolished and transformed into Vologda Viceroyalty. The latter was abolished in 1796, and Veliky Ustyug became the center of Velikoustyugsky Uyezd of Vologda Governorate. In 1918, the town became the administrative center of the newly established Northern Dvina Governorate. In 1924, the uyezds were abolished in favor of the new divisions, the districts (raions). In 1929, Northern Dvina Governorate was merged into Northern Krai. The krai consisted of five okrugs, one of which, Northern Dvina Okrug, had its administrative center in Veliky Ustyug. In July 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to Northern Krai. In 1936, Northern Krai was transformed into Northern Oblast (Northern Oblast (1936-1937)), and in 1937, Northern Oblast was split into Arkhangelsk Oblast and Vologda Oblast. Veliky Ustyug remained in Vologda Oblast ever since. Veliky Ustyug, in contrast to the majority of historical Russian towns, managed to preserve almost all of its architectural and cultural monuments. This was in a great part due to the efforts of the local intellectuals grouped around the Regional Museum, and most notably of Nikolay Bekryashev, the museum director from 1924 to 1938. This group managed to convince the authorities that the churches and old buildings have a historical significance and must be handed in the museum rather than demolished. Administrative and municipal status Within the framework of administrative divisions (subdivisions of Russia#Administrative divisions), Veliky Ustyug serves as the administrative center of Velikoustyugsky District, On January 7, 2008, then President Putin (Vladimir Putin) of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in the town of Veliky Ustyug as part of the Russian Orthodox Christmas Eve celebration.


great historical

of inhabited localities in Russia town in the northeast of Vologda Oblast, Russia, located at the confluence of the Sukhona (Sukhona River) and Yug Rivers. Population: On January 7, 2008, then President Putin (Vladimir Putin) of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in the town of Veliky Ustyug as part of the Russian Orthodox Christmas Eve celebration.


great military

In 1328, Ustyug was annexed by the Grand Duchy of Moscow. The town was not immediately affected by the Mongol invasion of Rus' in the 13th century; however, its rapid growth in the second half of the century was due to influx of refugees from Central Russia. In the 15th century, Veliky Ustyug became notable for the war between Vasily II of Moscow and his cousin Dmitry Shemyaka, which left Northern Russia deserted. Shemyaka took Veliky Ustyug in 1450, drowned in the Sukhona those citizens who refused to accept him as a prince, and made the town his residence for two years, until he was driven off by the forces of Vasily. In the 15th century, the town had a great military importance and became the base for the operations against the Finno-Ugric peoples. In 1613, during the Time of Troubles, Veliky Ustyug was besieged by Polish troops but never taken. Located at the junction of important trade routes, the town turned into a significant commercial and industrial center in the 16th and 17th centuries. Veliky Ustyug area was the birthplace of the explorers Semyon Dezhnyov, Yerofey Khabarov, Vladimir Atlasov, and of St. Stephen of Perm. Veliky Ustyug lost its key role as a river port with the diminishing importance of the Sukhona River route for trade between China and western Europe, which started with the foundation of Saint-Petersburg in 1703, whereby the trade was diverted to the Baltic Sea. The 16th and 17th centuries were also the time of the highest rise of the culture in Veliky Ustyug, in which the town acquired a national-wide significance. The town is known for its remarkable handicrafts, such as silver filigree, birch bark fretwork, decorative copper binding, and niello. The town developed a distinct manner of icon painting, Ustyug icon painting. In the 17th century, Veliky Ustyug was a major producer of tiles, which are still visible on many Ustyug churches


past architectural

, but there is no passenger navigation except for a number of ferry crossings. Veliky Ustyug is served by the Veliky Ustyug Airport with occasional passenger service to Vologda. Culture and recreation thumb Veliky Ustyug by Ivan Bilibin (File:Ivan Bilibin 090.jpg), around 1900 thumb St. Nicholas Church (Veliky Ustyug) St. Nicholas Church (File:Ustyug nicholas.jpg) and the bell-tower Veliky Ustyug preserves much of its past architectural heritage and has one of the best preserved architectural ensembles in Russia. The town contains 152 objects classified as cultural and historical heritage by the Russian Federal law, and additionally 25 objects classified as cultural and historical heritage of local importance. On January 7, 2008, then President Putin (Vladimir Putin) of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in the town of Veliky Ustyug as part of the Russian Orthodox Christmas Eve celebration.


food industry

On January 7, 2008, then President Putin (Vladimir Putin) of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in the town of Veliky Ustyug as part of the Russian Orthodox Christmas Eve celebration.


architectural

of inhabited localities in Russia town in the northeast of Vologda Oblast, Russia, located at the confluence of the Sukhona (Sukhona River) and Yug Rivers. Population: 36,000 (1970). Veliky Ustyug has a great historical significance and in the past was one of the major cities of the Russian North. Whereas it preserved some of the past urban structure and many of the architectural monuments

of historical Russian towns, managed to preserve almost all of its architectural and cultural monuments. This was in a great part due to the efforts of the local intellectuals grouped around the Regional Museum, and most notably of Nikolay Bekryashev, the museum director from 1924 to 1938. This group managed to convince the authorities that the churches and old buildings have a historical significance and must be handed in the museum rather than demolished. Administrative and municipal status

, but there is no passenger navigation except for a number of ferry crossings. Veliky Ustyug is served by the Veliky Ustyug Airport with occasional passenger service to Vologda. Culture and recreation thumb Veliky Ustyug by Ivan Bilibin (File:Ivan Bilibin 090.jpg), around 1900 thumb St. Nicholas Church (Veliky Ustyug) St. Nicholas Church (File:Ustyug nicholas.jpg) and the bell-tower Veliky Ustyug preserves much of its past architectural heritage and has one

Veliky Ustyug

140px right thumb 10 rubles (2007). Ancient Towns Of Russia Coin Series (File:RR5514-0049R.png)

'''Veliky Ustyug''' ( 36,000 (1970).

Veliky Ustyug has a great historical significance and in the past was one of the major cities of the Russian North. Whereas it preserved some of the past urban structure and many of the architectural monuments, it was completely deprived of its leading role, and is currently merely a tourist attraction.

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