Valencia

What is Valencia known for?


speaking skills

the capital, Valencian is often preferred. As in Barcelona, with Catalan, it helps to be sensitive to this language dynamic. However, the linguistic issue is not as controversial as in Barcelona and most people in Valencia speak Spanish as their first and commonly, only language. You have some Spanish language schools in Valencia, for example "Lingua Valencia"speaking skills of the locals can be hit or miss. Most people under 35 speak some English and some quite a bit, but most would obviously prefer being addressed at first in Spanish or Valencian. French may be spoken or understood by some. Get in By plane File:Valencia Airport 01.jpg thumb Valencia Airport Valencia Airport ( Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia


complex public

a complex public transportation system. However, for longer trips, see below for some pointers. By train The '''Metro Valencia''' consists of five lines (from which one is a tramway to the beach) and connects the suburbs with the city. As of 2011, the one-way fare for one zone is €1.40. The ticket itself costs an additional €1 and contains a rechargeable chip. This metro system is not extensive, but can get you to major points within the city. Make sure you


title movie

: www.comunitatvalenciana.com Official website of the Community Valenciana tourism * Valencia-La Ciudad de las Artes y de las Ciencias * Attractions in Valencia *


Maracas

phone +34 96 391-7356 tollfree fax hours price content Gay and hetero-friendly disco in Barri del Carme, located near the typical drinking haunts of the neighbourhood, but open after everything else closes. *


natural de

Francisco de P. Momblanch y Gonzálbez title Historia de la Albufera de Valencia url http: books.google.com books?id 6QUrAQAAMAAJ accessdate 5 February 2013 year 1960 publisher Excmo. Anuntamiento page 301 and today it forms the main portion of the ''Parc Natural de l'Albufera'' (Albufera Nature Reserve (Albufera)), with a surface area of . In 1986, because of its cultural, historical, and ecological value, the ''Generalitat Valenciana'' declared

''' — A fresh water lake which is part of the protected natural space called Parc Natural de l'Albufera, which comprises the lake and surrounding marshy areas, as well as the pinewood and sandy dunes and beaches of '''El Saler'''. Rice is cultivated in the surrounding area of the lake. The Albufera also hosts many interesting varieties of migratory birds. The local village in the area, El Palmar, is also a good place, if not the best, to try some paella or other local dishes. * '''El Saler

''' — This is the coastal area of the Parc Natural de l'Albufera. A long stretch of land with a dense pinewood, dunes and marshes that separates the lake from the sea. These beaches are on "protected" land and are the cleanest, most secluded beaches within easy reach of the city. Despite being very near the city, due to their protection and lack of the services of an urban or resort beach, they used to be pretty quiet, something not few people might prefer to the urban Las Arenas, Malvarrosa or Patacona beaches. Naturism is allowed and common in some of them, like in Playa de la Garrofera and in Playa de la Devesa (this one has to be reached on foot walking for about 5-10 minutes from the parking area). Accessible by bus, but that requires a good level of organization. A round-trip taxi ride should cost between €10-20, depending on how far along the beach you go. *'''Manises''', 15 km south west of Valencia. It is not only the site of Valencia's airport, but also an important center for pottery. Some 100 ceramics factories are located in the municipality, where the art has been practiced for at least 700 years. At the MCM Museum, there are exhibitions about the history of ceramics in the area. * '''La Tomatina''', hosted by nearby Buñol on the last Wednesday of August. A festival that involves thousands of participants throwing ripe tomatoes at each other. Make sure you wear clothes that you can throw out after wards, as it gets very messy. * '''Cullera''', is the nearest beach resort from the city, apart from the more aimed at locals Pobla de Farnals, and worth a day visit from Valencia if you have time. It is settled down an isolated mountain (with a big white sign saying "Cullera" on it) beside a beautiful bay. It has crowded and quiet beaches. The most quiet ones are located along the lighthouse road. There is also a naturist beach right North of Cullera, in Playa del Dossel, with a tricky road to access it. There is a castle on top of the mountain from which enjoy stunning views. * Rent a car and do a day trip to any number of picturesque villages or small cities in the region, including Chulilla, Sot de Chera, Xátiva, Sagunto, among others. * '''Hot Spring and other discoveries''': A small tour company offers rides and guided visits to off-the-beaten-path destinations around Valencia. The most popular tour is an incredible hot Spring natural pool in a canyon, 90 km of Valencia. Access by public transportation is difficult. Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia


massive construction

hosted to the 2007 & 2010 America's Cup. This fact, along with the construction of the "City of Arts and Science" by renowned architect and Valencian Santiago Calatrava have made Valencia a city in transition. Massive construction and transformation over the last 10 years have turned a once little-considered medium city into a meatier and more interesting destination. Despite being on the Mediterranean Sea, even residents used


great development

. Golden Age of Valencia thumb left Hall of Columns in the Silk Exchange ''(Lonja de la Seda)'' of Valencia (File:Llotja columnari1.jpg) The 15th century was a time of economic expansion, known as the Valencian Golden Age, in which culture and the arts flourished. Concurrent population growth made Valencia the most populous city in the Crown of Aragon. Local industry, led by textile production, reached a great development, and a financial institution, the ''Canvi de Taula'', was created to support municipal banking operations; Valencian bankers lent funds to Queen Isabella I of Castile for Columbus (Christopher Columbus)' voyage in 1492. At the end of the century the Silk Exchange (Llotja de la Seda) ''(Llotja de la Seda)'' building was erected as the city became a commercial emporium that attracted merchants from all over Europe. This boom was reflected in the growth of artistic and cultural pursuits. Some of the most emblematic buildings of the city were built during this period, including the Serranos Towers (1392), the Lonja (1482), the Miguelete and the Chapel of the Kings of the Convent of Santo Domingo. In painting and sculpture, Flemish and Italian trends had an influence on artists such as Lluís Dalmau, Peris Gonçal and Forment Damian. Literature flourished with the patronage of the court of Alfonso the Magnanimous (Alfonso V of Aragon), supporting authors like Ausias March, Roiç de Corella, and Isabel de Villena. By 1460 Joanot Martorell wrote ''Tirant lo Blanch'', an innovative novel of chivalry that influenced many later writers, from Cervantes to Shakespeare. Ausiàs March was one of the first poets to use the everyday language Valencian (Valencian language), instead of the troubadour language, Occitan. Also around this time, between 1499 and 1502, the University of Valencia was founded under the parsimonious name of '' Estudio General'' (General Studies). Valencia was one of the most influential cities on the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) in the 15th and 16th centuries. The first printing press (Global spread of the printing press) in the Iberian Peninsula was located in Valencia. The first printed Bible in a Romance language, the Valencian Bible attributed to Bonifaci Ferrer, was printed in Valencia circa 1478. Early Modern ;Spanish Empire thumb 300px The Meeting of the Brotherhoods ''(La paz de las Germanías)'', by Marcelino de Unceta (File:gerpaz.jpg) Following the discovery of the Americas, the European economy was oriented towards the Atlantic to the detriment of the Mediterranean trade. Despite the dynastic union of Aragon with Castile, the conquest and exploitation of America was the exclusive domain of Castile. The Valencians, like the Catalans, Aragonese and Majorcans, were prohibited participation in the cross-Atlantic commerce. Faced with this loss of business, Valencia suffered a severe economic crisis. This manifested early in 1519–1523 when the artisan guilds (Revolt of the Brotherhoods) known as the Germanies (Revolt of the Brotherhoods) revolted against the government of the Habsburg (House of Habsburg) king Charles I (Charles I of Spain) in Valencia, now part of the Crown of Aragon, with most of the fighting done in 1521. The revolt was an anti-monarchist, anti-feudal autonomist movement inspired by the Italian republics, and a social revolt against the nobility who had fled the city before an epidemic of plague in 1519. It also bore a strong anti-Islamic aspect, as rebels rioted against Aragon's population of mudéjars and imposed forced conversions to Christianity. The vicereine Germaine of Foix brutally repressed the uprising and its leaders, and this accelerated the authoritarian centralization of the government of Charles I. Queen Germaine favored harsh treatment of the ''agermanats''. She is thought to have signed the death warrants of 100 former rebels personally, and sources indicate that as many as 800 executions may have occurred. The ''agermanats'' are comparable to the ''comuneros (Revolt of the Comuneros)'' of neighboring Castile, who fought a similar revolt against Charles from 1520–1522. The crisis deepened during the 17th century with the expulsion (Expulsion of the Moriscos) in 1609 of the Jews and the Moriscos, descendants of the Muslim population that converted to Christianity under threat of exile from Ferdinand and Isabella in 1502. From 1609 through 1614, the Spanish government systematically forced Moriscos to leave the kingdom for Muslim North Africa. They were concentrated in the former Kingdom of Aragon, where they constituted a fifth of the population, and the Valencia area specifically, where they were roughly a third of the total population. Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia


fine gold

Valerian in the 3rd century, after having been brought by St. Peter (Saint Peter) to Rome from Jerusalem. The ''Santo Caliz'' (Holy Chalice) is a simple, small stone cup. Its base was added in medieval times (Medieval Times) and consists of fine gold, alabaster and gem stones. Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia


massive architectural

of Madrid. Valencia is famous for its Fallas Festival in March, for being the birthplace of ''paella'', for hosting the "2007 & 2010 America's Cup", and for the massive architectural project by Santiago Calatrava called The City of Arts and Sciences. The river Turia ran through the center of the city, but it was redirected a while back and replaced by a beautiful park. This is a very nice place to spend any free time you have in the city on a sunny day. Understand Valencia hosted to the 2007 & 2010 America's Cup. This fact, along with the construction of the "City of Arts and Science" by renowned architect and Valencian Santiago Calatrava have made Valencia a city in transition. Massive construction and transformation over the last 10 years have turned a once little-considered medium city into a meatier and more interesting destination. Despite being on the Mediterranean Sea, even residents used to say that "Valencia has always lived with its back to the sea", meaning that the spirit and the core of the city is not necessarily integrated with its beach. The city center and the most visited neighborhoods are not particularly close to the beach. The construction of the city esplanade in the eighties, along with the marina, and the recovery of the tram to the maritime neighborhoods, have had a big influence to ease this stance. Valencia was founded by the Romans and was held by the Moors from the 8th to the 13th century (with a short interruption by El Cid). In 1609, the Moors who had converted to Catholicism were expelled from the city. During the Spanish civil war in the 1930s, Valencia was the capital of the Republic, which eventually lost to Franco's forces. Climate *'''Summer''' — Like most European countries, August is a slow month as many of the residents are on vacation. At this time of year Valencia is very hot and humid with temperatures averaging between 30-35°C (86—95°F) by day and 20-25°C (68—77°F) by night. *'''Fall''' — September and October are more active months and the weather permits beach outings. Important events take place during this season. *'''Winter''' — Though temperatures are still relatively mild, it's too cold to sunbathe at the beach. It's not unusual though the occasional days reaching around 20°C (68°F) in the middle of this season. Sidewalk cafes use to work all the year. *'''Spring''' — A lovely time to visit. The annual "Fallas de San José" unofficially marks the beginning of spring. Cafes and restaurants open their terraces and life spills out onto the street once again. Talk Valencia's official languages are Catalan phrasebook Valencian Catalan , and Spanish (Spanish phrasebook). In the capital of Valencia, which is the third largest city in Spain, not many people speak Valencian, nor are they offended if addressed in Spanish. However, outside the capital, Valencian is often preferred. As in Barcelona, with Catalan, it helps to be sensitive to this language dynamic. However, the linguistic issue is not as controversial as in Barcelona and most people in Valencia speak Spanish as their first and commonly, only language. You have some Spanish language schools in Valencia, for example "Lingua Valencia"speaking skills of the locals can be hit or miss. Most people under 35 speak some English and some quite a bit, but most would obviously prefer being addressed at first in Spanish or Valencian. French may be spoken or understood by some. Get in By plane File:Valencia Airport 01.jpg thumb Valencia Airport Valencia Airport ( Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia


growing political

responded to these demands and gained enormous popular support, dominating the ruling council between 1901 and 1923. World War I (1914–1918) greatly affected the Valencian economy, causing the collapse of its citrus exports. The establishment of the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera (Primo de Rivera y Orbaneja, Miguel, Marques de Estella) in 1923 tempered social unrest for some years, but not the growing political radicalization of the working classes. The labor movement gradually consolidated its union organization, while the conservative factions rallied around the Valencian Regional Right. The Republic (1931–1939) opened the way for democratic participation and the increased politicisation of citizens, especially in response to the rise of Conservative Front power in 1933. This climate marked the elections of 1936, won by the Popular Front political coalition, which promoted the fervor of the masses. The military uprising of 18 July failed to triumph in Valencia. For some months there was a revolutionary atmosphere, gradually neutralised by the government. The inevitable march to civil war and the combat in Madrid resulted in the removal of the capital of the Republic to Valencia. On 6 November 1936 the city became the capital of Republican Spain under the control of the prime minister Manuel Azana; the government moved to the Palau de Benicarló, its ministries occupying various other buildings. The city was heavily bombarded by air and sea, necessitating the construction of over two hundred bomb shelters to protect the population. On 13 January 1937 the city was first shelled by a vessel of the Fascist Italian Navy, which was blockading the port by the order of Benito Mussolini. The bombardment intensified and inflicted massive destruction on several occasions; by the end of the war the city had survived 442 bombardments, leaving 2,831 dead and 847 wounded, although it is estimated that the death toll was higher, as the data given are those recognized by Francisco Franco's government. The Republican government passed to Juan Negrín on 17 May 1937 and on 31 October of that year moved to Barcelona. On 30 March 1939 Valencia surrendered and the Nationalist troops entered the city. The postwar years were a time of hardship for Valencians. During Franco's regime speaking or teaching Valencian was prohibited; in a significant reversal it is now compulsory for every schoolchild in Valencia. thumb Palau generalitat ''Palau de la Generalitat'', symbol of the recovery of self-government in Valencia, and seat of the Government of Valencia since 1978 (File:Palau generalitat.jpg) The dictatorship of Franco forbade political parties and began a harsh ideological and cultural repression countenanced Commons:Category:Valencia Wikipedia:Valencia Dmoz:Regional Europe Spain Autonomous Communities Valencian Community Valencia Valencia

Valencia

'''Valencia''' ( ), is the capital (capital (political)) of the autonomous community (autonomous communities of Spain) of Valencia (Valencian Community) and the third largest city (municipalities of Spain) in Spain after Madrid and Barcelona, with around 800,000 inhabitants in the administrative centre. Its urban area extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of around 1.5 million people. World Urban Areas - Demographia, May 2014 Valencia is Spain's third largest metropolitan area (List of metropolitan areas in Spain), with a population ranging from 1.7 to 2.5 million. The city has global city status. The Port of Valencia is the 5th busiest container port in Europe (List of busiest ports in Europe) and busiest container port on the Mediterranean Sea.

Valencia was founded as a Roman colony in 138 BC. The city is situated on the banks of the Turia (Turia (river)), on the east coast of the Iberian Peninsula, fronting the Gulf of Valencia on the Mediterranean Sea. Its historic centre is one of the largest in Spain, with approximately 169 hectares;

Valencia is integrated into an industrial area on the ''Costa del Azahar'' (Orange Blossom Coast). Valencia's main festival is the ''Falles''. The traditional Spanish dish, ''paella'', originated in Valencia.

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