Urmia

What is Urmia known for?


long battle

) refers to the mass slaughter of the Assyrian (Assyrian people) population of the Ottoman Empire during the 1890s, the First World War, and the period of 1922-1925. Travis, Hannibal. Genocide in the Middle East: The Ottoman Empire, Iraq, and Sudan. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2010, 2007, pp. 237-77, 293–294. Khosoreva, Anahit. "The Assyrian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire and Adjacent Territories" in ''The Armenian Genocide: Cultural and Ethical Legacies''. Ed. Richard G. Hovannisian. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2007, pp. 267–274. ISBN 1-4128-0619-4. The Assyrian population of upper Mesopotamia (the Tur Abdin, Hakkari, Van, Siirt regions of present-day southeastern Turkey and the Urmia region of northwestern Iran) was forcibly relocated and massacred by Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) (Turkish (Turkish people)) and Kurdish (Kurdish people) forces between 1914 and 1920. Estimates on the overall death toll have


international medical

Pr0-Hospital * Gholipour Children's Pro-Hospital * Razi Psychiatry Pro-Hospital * 504 Artesh Hospital * Arefian Hospital * Azerbaijan Hospital * Milad international medical center * Omid Cancer Pro-Clinic Transportation ''Inner City:'' Most Urmia residents travel by car through the system of roads and highways. Urmia is also served by taxi and bus. * Taxicab Taxi


modern publishing

, in northern Iraq. This literature led to the establishment of Chaldean Neo-Aramaic as a written literary language. In the nineteenth century, printing presses were established in Urmia, in northern Iran. This led to the establishment of the 'General Urmian' dialect of Assyrian Neo-Aramaic as the standard in much Neo-Syriac literature. The comparative ease of modern publishing methods has encouraged other colloquial Neo-Aramaic languages, like Turoyo language Turoyo


written literary

, in northern Iraq. This literature led to the establishment of Chaldean Neo-Aramaic as a written literary language. In the nineteenth century, printing presses were established in Urmia, in northern Iran. This led to the establishment of the 'General Urmian' dialect of Assyrian Neo-Aramaic as the standard in much Neo-Syriac literature. The comparative ease of modern publishing methods has encouraged other colloquial Neo-Aramaic languages, like Turoyo (Turoyo language) and Senaya (Senaya language), to begin to produce literature. Composition in the classical Syriac language still continues, especially among members of the Syriac Orthodox Church, where students in the church's monasteries are taught living, spoken Syriac, or '' Commons:Category:Urmia


literary

the first battle of Dimdim as a result of Kurdish mutiny or treason, in Kurdish oral traditions (Beytî dimdim), literary works (Dzhalilov, pp. 67–72), and histories, it was treated as a struggle of the Kurdish people against foreign domination. In fact, Beytî dimdim is considered a national epic second only to Mem û Zîn by Ahmad Khani. The first literary account of this battle is written by Faqi Tayran. DIMDIM

1836, when that dialect was chosen by Justin Perkins, an American Presbyterian missionary, for the creation of a standard literary dialect of Assyrian. * Urmian group: ** Urmia (west of Lake Urmia) ** Sopurghan (north of Urmia) '''Eugene Hoffman Dooman''' (1890 – 1969) served as counselor at the United States Embassy in Tokyo during the critical negotiations between the two countries during World War II. Born in Osaka

, in northern Iraq. This literature led to the establishment of Chaldean Neo-Aramaic as a written literary language. In the nineteenth century, printing presses were established in Urmia, in northern Iran. This led to the establishment of the 'General Urmian' dialect of Assyrian Neo-Aramaic as the standard in much Neo-Syriac literature. The comparative ease of modern publishing methods has encouraged other colloquial Neo-Aramaic languages, like Turoyo language Turoyo


tehran'

Urmia was an important center for higher education approximately a century ago, indeed, medical faculty of Urmia which was built by Joseph Cochran and a team of American medical associates in 1878, is the first University of Iran. Unfortunately the faculty became shut down even before establishment of first official university of Iran, University of Tehran. Nowadays Urmia has become a considerable educational city. The city owns state and private universities

to:Tehran, Mashhad, Kish Island, Shiraz, Esfahan. Notable people * Safi al-Din al-Urmawi (صفی الدین اورموی): Iranian Azerbaijani (Iranian Azerbaijanis) 13th-century poet and musical theorist * Heidar Amou Oghly (Haydar Khan e Amo-oghli) (حیدرخان عمواوغلی): Founder of the Communist Party of Iran (Communist Party of Iran (1920)) and the first Secretary of the Communist Party of Iran and effective activist movement constitutional

Sulaqa Shem style "text-align:right" 14 During the Pahlavi


technical school

School Ghazi Tabatabaee Technical School The Girls Technical School of Urmia Najand Institute of Higher Education University College Afagh Libraries * Allame Tabatabayee Library * Central Library of Urmia * Library of Ghaem * Library of I.R. Iran Education Ministry * Library of Imam Ali * Library

University of Urmia Payame Noor University Payame Noor University of Urmia Elmi Karbordi University of Urmia University College of Saba University College of Azarabadegan University College of Elm O fan University College of Kamal Shahid Beheshti Technical


related quot'

to Indo-Iranian urmi- "wave" and urmya- "undulating, wavy", The Proto-Indoaryans, by T. Burrow, The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, No. 2 (1973), pp. 123-140, Published by: Cambridge University Press, see 139 which is due to the local Assyrian folk etymology for the name which related "Mia" to Syriac (Syriac language) meaning "water." Hence ''Urmia'' simply means 'Watertown" — a befitting


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communities that once lived between Lake Urmia and Mosul are not all mutually intelligible. In some places, for example Urmia, Christians and Jews speak mutually unintelligible varieties of Modern Eastern Aramaic in the same place. In others, the Nineveh Plains around Mosul for example, the varieties of the two ethnic and faith communities are similar enough to allow conversation. During the reign of Sarduri I (834 (834 BC)–828 BC), Urartu had become a strong


medical education

minister in the government of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad * Saeid Marouf, volleyball player * Reza Moridi, Member of Parliament, Ontario, Canada and Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities as well as Minister of Research and Innovation. First Iranian (Azeri) to become a cabinet minister out of Iran and first Iranian to be elected to a parliament in North America. * Habib Mohebian, known as Habib, a pop musician * Masoud Pezeshkian, Minister of Health and Medical Education in the government of Mohammad Khatami See also Commons:Category:Urmia

Urmia

'''Urmia''' Variously transliterated (Romanization of Persian) as ''Oroumieh'', ''Oroumiyeh'', ''Orūmīyeh'' and ''Urūmiyeh'' ) or ''Urumiyeh'', or ''Urumiah'' is a city in and the capital of West Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Urmia is situated at an altitude of 1,330 m above sea level, and is located along the Shahar Chay river (City River) on the Urmia Plain. Lake Urmia lies to the east of the city, with the mountainous Turkish (Turkey) border to the west.

Urmia is the 10th most populated (List of Iran cities by population) city in Iran. At the 2012 census, its population was 667,499 with 197,749 households.

The city is the trade center for a fertile agricultural region where fruit (especially apple and grape) and tobacco are grown. An important town by the 9th century, Urmia was seized by the Seljuk Turks (1184), and later occupied a number of times by the Ottoman Turks. Urmia was the seat of the first U.S. Christian mission in Iran (1835). Around AD 1900, Christians made up more than 40% of the city's population, however, most of the Christians fled in 1918 http: www.encyclopedia.com doc 1E1-Urmia.html E.J. Brill's First Encyclopaedia of Islam, 1913-1936, M. Th Houtsma, page 1035, 1987 as a result of the Persian Campaign during World War I and the Armenian (Armenian Genocide) and Assyrian Genocides.

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