Tyre, Lebanon

What is Tyre, Lebanon known for?


current year

the PLO for endangering Lebanese civilians with their attacks. Nergal Shalmaneser III of Assyria wiped out Jerusalem and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in this world in 854 B.C., and his successors destroyed the Greek city-states (Archaic period in Greece) a century later. In the "current year" of 1678, various empires based on slavery and human sacrifice cover the globe (except for an Infinity Patrol-supported haven in southern Africa) while an anomalous ice age threatens to wipe out those unfortunate to live in a world where monotheism, democracy and the Greek (Greek alphabet) and Latin (Latin alphabet) alphabets were destroyed almost before they could begin. Eusebius characterizes Urbanus as a man who enjoyed some variety in his punishments. One day, shortly after Easter 307, he ordered the virgin Theodosia from Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) (Ṣūr, Lebanon) thrown to the sea for conversing with Christians attending trial and refusing sacrifice; the Christians in court, meanwhile, he sent to Phaeno. Eusebius, ''De Martyribus Palestinae'' 7.1f, cited in Barnes, ''Constantine and Eusebius'', 152. On a single day, November 2, 307, Urbanus sentenced a man named Domninus to be burned alive, three youths to fight as gladiators, and a priest to be exposed to a beast. On the same day, he ordered some young men to be castrated, sent three virgins to brothels, and imprisoned a number of others, including Pamphilus of Caesarea, a priest, scholar, and defender of the theologian Origen. Eusebius, ''Historia Ecclesiastica'' 8.13.5; ''De Martyribus Palestinae'' 7.3ff; 13; Barnes, ''Constantine and Eusebius'', 152–53; Keresztes, 388. Soon after, and for unknown reasons, Urbanus was stripped of his rank, imprisoned, tried, and executed, all in one day of expedited proceedings. Eusebius, ''De Martyribus Palestinae'' 7.7; Barnes, ''Constantine and Eusebius'', 153. His replacement, Firmilianus (Firmilian (Roman governor)), was a veteran soldier and one of Maximinus's trusted confidants. Eusebius, ''De Martyribus Palestinae'' (L) 8.1; (S) 11.31; Barnes, ''Constantine and Eusebius'', 153. The M107 was also used by the Israel Defense Forces in the various Arab–Israeli conflicts. When these guns were outranged by rocket fire from Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon), they were upgraded with the addition of extended range, full bore ammunition and new powder supplied by Gerald Bull's Space Research Corporation. This allowed operations over 50 km with increased accuracy. Jesus then "withdraws", ''anechōrēsen'', and goes down by a lake, presumably the Sea of Galilee, and people follow him there. Some see the word as meaning flight as it comes after Mark talks about the plot against Jesus, but it could just as easily mean leaving Capernaum to go to the sea. Mark says the people had come from "...Judea, Jerusalem, Idumea (Edom), and the regions across the Jordan (Jordan river) and around Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon." ( For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


original construction

to debate this topic with Medieval Karaite Jewish sages. For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


nature international

Protecting-marine-biodiversity-in-Lebanon publisher International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) (International Union for Conservation of Nature) date 2 May 2012 For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


quot story

-eyed-lady-lowlands Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands , Blonde on Blonde, 1966. * Hiram Abiff, a central figure in the mythology and symbolism of Freemasonry, is said to have hailed from Tyre. * Poul Anderson's (Poul Anderson) "Ivory, and Apes, and Peacocks" story, part of the Time Patrol series (Poul Anderson#Time Patrol), is set in ancient Tyre during the time of King Hiram I. File:TyreAlMinaCollonnadedStreet.jpg Main colonnaded street at ''Al Mina'' excavation site File:TyreAlMinaAgora.jpg ''Al Mina'' excavation area – supposed Roman agora File:TyreNarrowStChrQrt.jpg A typical narrow street in the Christian quarter File:TyreFishingHarbourOldTown.jpg Tyre harbor International relations For this reason, early Christian baptistries (Baptismal font) and tombs typically were shaped as octagons. The practice of octaves was first introduced under Constantine I, when the dedication festivities of the basilicas at Jerusalem and Tyre, Lebanon were observed for eight days. After these one-off occasions, annual liturgical feasts began to be dignified with an octave. The first such feasts were Easter, Pentecost, and, in the East, Epiphany (Epiphany (holiday)). This occurred in the fourth century and served as a period of time for the newly baptized to take a joyful retreat. "Octave", ''Catholic Encyclopedia'' Margaritus first appears as a leader of the fleet alongside Tancred, then just count of Lecce, which took Cephalonia and the Ionian Islands in 1185 and then harassed Isaac Comnenus (Isaac Comnenus of Cyprus)' Cyprus and captured many of his ships, taking them back to Sicily. In Autumn 1187, King William sent him with a fleet to the Holy Land, where, on 2 October, Saladin had captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)). Margaritus, with 60 ships and 200 knights, patrolled the Palestine coast constantly, preventing Saladin from taking any of the vital seaports of the Latin crusader kingdom (Kingdom of Jerusalem). In July 1188, he arrived at Tripoli (Tripoli, Lebanon) and forced Saladin to raise the siege of Krak des Chevaliers. Something similar happened at Marqab, Latakia, and Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) in the following year. On 11 November 1189, William died and his fleet returned. On 4 October 1190, Margaritus, the ''strategos'' Jordan du Pin, and many other nobles of Messina were forced to flee when Richard the Lion-Hearted, king of England, sacked the city and burnt it. Margaritus took little part thereafter in the Third Crusade. *It is metal well known in ancient times. It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians (w:Phoenicians) of Tyre (w:Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon (w:Sidon) obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles (w:British Isles). In Ezek (w:Book of Ezekiel) (27:12_ it is said to have been brought from Tarshish (w:Tarshish), which was probably a commercial emporium supplied with commodities from other places. In Isa (w:Book of Isaiah) (1:25) the word so rendered is generally understood of lead (w:Pead), the alloy with which the silver had become mixed. The fire of the Babylonish Captivity (w:Babylonish Captivity) would be the means of purging out the idolatrous (w:Idolatrous) alloy that had corrupted the people. **In Bible Dictionary quoted in Dictionary in: "tin".


ancient books

, with a field between, where the contests should take place. ''History of the Transmission of Ancient Books to Modern Times'' (London, 1827) and ''The Process of Historical Proof'' (London, 1828) were later remodelled as a single work (1859), in which he attempted to show grounds for accepting literary documents like the Bible as a basis for history. Next appeared an expurgated translation of Herodotus (London, 1829), work which seems to have suggested an anonymous romance, ''The Temple


past written

in Phoenicia itself, arguably surviving into Augustine (Augustine of Hippo)'s time. It may have even survived the Arabic conquest of North Africa: the geographer al-Bakrī (Abū 'Ubayd 'Abd Allāh al-Bakrī) describes a people speaking a language that was not Berber (Berber languages), Latin or Coptic (Coptic language) in the city of Sirte in northern Libya, a region where spoken Punic survived well past written use.


discovery news

Aided Alexander the Great publisher Discovery News date May 21, 2007 ) and the mainland settlement, originally called Ushu (later called Palaetyrus, meaning "Old Tyre," by the Greeks) was actually more like a line of suburbs than any one city and was used primarily as a source of water and timber for the main island city. 'Tyre' from Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed. ref


range including

, when he was succeeded by his brother Amalric (Amalric II of Jerusalem). The exact region referred to as "Blessed Land" in the Qur'an verse 21:71 has been interpreted differently by various scholars: Abdullah Yusuf Ali likens it to a wide land range including, Syria, Palestine and the cities of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon; Az-Zujaj describes it as, ''"Damascus, Palestine, and a bit of Jordan"''; Qatada claims it to be, ''"the Levant


historical amp

into the "parts of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) and Sidon" near the Mediterranean Sea where the Canaanite woman's daughter episode takes place in Matthew 15:21–28 (wikisource:Bible (American Standard) Matthew#15:21) and Mark 7:24-30 (wikisource:Bible (American Standard) Mark#7:24). ''Jesus the miracle worker: a historical & theological study'' by Graham H. Twelftree 1999 ISBN 0-8308-1596-1 pages 133-134 This episode is an example of how Jesus


traditional view

-sovereign local entity. The term '''city-state''' which originated in English (alongside the German '''Stadtstaat''') does not fully translate the Greek term. The ''poleis'' were not like other primordial ancient city-states like Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon) or Sidon, which were ruled by a king or a small oligarchy, but rather a political entity ruled by its body of citizens. The traditional view of archaeologists, that the appearance of urbanization at excavation sites could be read

Tyre, Lebanon

website '''Tyre''' (Arabic (Arabic language): south of Beirut. The name of the city means "rock (rock (geology))" (Bikai, P., "The Land of Tyre", in Joukowsky, M., ''The Heritage of Tyre'', 1992, chapter 2, p. 13) after the rocky formation on which the town was originally built. The adjective for Tyre is ''Tyrian'', and the inhabitants are ''Tyrians''.

Tyre is an ancient Phoenician city and the legendary birthplace of Europa (Europa (mythology)) and Elissa (Dido (Queen of Carthage)) (Dido). Today it is the fourth largest city in Lebanon Tyre City, Lebanon and houses one of the nation's major ports. Tourism is a major industry. The city has a number of ancient sites, including its Roman Hippodrome which was added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1979. Resolution 459 Lebanon's Archaeological Heritage

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