Tarim, Yemen

What is Tarim, Yemen known for?


history series

: www.saudiaramcoworld.com issue 198603 manhattan.in.the.hadramaut.htm Manhattan in the Hadramaut . ''Saudi Aramco World'' (June 1986) pages 22,-27 External links *Official Website of the Al-Quaiti Royal Family of Hadhramaut * The Graves of Tarim: Genealogy and Mobility across the Indian Ocean, by Engseng Ho, a professor at Harvard. California World History series. A 500-year history of Hadramawt's


early high

Heritage Centre The city has some of the tallest mud buildings in the world, with some of them over 30 meters (100 feet) high, thus being early high-rise apartment buildings. In order to protect the buildings from rain and erosion, the walls must


year history

: www.saudiaramcoworld.com issue 198603 manhattan.in.the.hadramaut.htm Manhattan in the Hadramaut . ''Saudi Aramco World'' (June 1986) pages 22,-27 External links *Official Website of the Al-Quaiti Royal Family of Hadhramaut * The Graves of Tarim: Genealogy and Mobility across the Indian Ocean, by Engseng Ho, a professor at Harvard. California World History series. A 500-year history of Hadramawt's


small quot

: Sayyid scholar of Islam from Tarim *Abdul Rahman Al-Mash’hoor Notes ;References *Christian, Scott. Perceptions of Pakistan: Yemen: Introduction to Tarim - City of Scholars, January 8, 2006 *Hatab, Hasan. The Fellowship of Tarim, Yemen, 2005 *Al-Batati, Saeed.


570

Byzantines to protect Yemeni Christians from the ruler Najran, a convert to Judaism. The Yemenis opposed Ethiopian rule and sought the Sassanid Persians for assistance. The result was that the Persians took over about 570 CE. The Persians appear to have been in Hadhramaut, but the only clear evidence of their presence is at Husn al Urr, a fort between Tarim and Qabr Hud. Early Islamic period In 625, Badhan (Badhan (Persian Governor)), the Persian Governor of Sana’a


major part

. '' Yemen Times'', June 2005 As part of the Great Arab Expansion, Hadhramis formed a major part of the Arab armies that conquered North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula. In the mid-8th century, a preacher from Basra called Abdullah bin Yahya arrived in Hadhramaut and established the Ibadhi rite of Islam. By the 10th century conflict had erupted between the Hashid and Bakil, the two dominant tribes in the Northern Highlands. Sheikh al-Hadi Yahya bin al-Hussain bin al-Qasim ar-Rassi (a sayyid) was called from Medina to settle this affair at Sa’da in 893-897. He founded the Zaidi (Zaidiyyah) Imamate which reigned until Imam Al-Badr was disposed in 1962. Sayyid 'Ali ibn 'Ali Al-Zaidi, A short History of the Yemenite Shiites (2005) In 951 CE, Imam Aḥmad bin `Isā Al-Muhājir (Ahmad al-Muhajir) arrived from Iraq with a large number of followers and established the Shafi`i madhab of Sunni Islam (according to majority of Historians), (100 feet) high, thus being early high-rise apartment buildings. In order to protect the buildings from rain and erosion, the walls must be routinely maintained by applying fresh layers of mud. The nearby town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) contains the tallest structure in the Wadi Hadhramaut valley, the mudbrick minaret of the Al-Mihdhar mosque. It stands at a height of approximately 53 meters (175 feet.) This is the tallest minaret in the southern Arabian peninsula. p. 9, ''The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9 11 to the Eavesdropping on America'', James Bamford, Random House, Inc., 2009, ISBN 0-307-27939-1. '''Imam Abd Allah ibn Alawi al-Haddad''' born in 1634 CE (1044 Hijri). He lived his entire life in the town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) in Yemen’s Valley of Hadramawt and died there in 1720 CE (1132 Hijri). In Islamic history, he was considered one of the sages. He was an adherent to the Ashari Sunni Creed of Faith (Aqeedah), while in Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh), he was a Shafii.


works projects

the most influential. Many members of the family were respected religious scholars. At the same time, they were among the regions first Western (Western culture)izing elite and contributed to public works projects in the name of modernization. Their palaces remain as testament to both their affluence and the complex identity of the modernizing elite of the colonial (Colonialism) period. Palaces financed by the al-Kafs and other families were executed in the stylistic idioms they encountered in British India and Southeast Asia. Consequently, the palaces include examples of Mughal (Mughal architecture), British Colonial, Art Nouveau, Deco, Rococo, Neo-Classical (Neoclassical architecture), and Modernist styles unparalleled in Yemen. While these foreign decorative styles were incorporated into the Tarimi architectural idiom, traditional Hadhrami construction techniques based on the thousand-year-old traditions of unfired mud brick and lime plasters served as the primary methods for executing these buildings. Qasr al-‘Ishshah Complex The complex of ‘Umar bin Shaikh al-Kaf, Qasr al-‘Ishshah is one of the original al-Kaf houses in Tarim. Shaikh al-Kaf built the house on proceeds made in South Asian trade and investment in Singapore’s ''Grand Hotel de l'Europe'' during the 1930s. Clarence-Smith, W. Middle Eastern Entrepreneurs in Southeast Asia, University of London ‘Ishshah derives from the Arabic root ‘-sh-sh meaning to nest, take root, or establish. Qasr al-‘Ishshah is a collection of several buildings constructed over a forty year period. The first building, known as Dar Dawil, was constructed during the 1890s. As Umar’s family grew, so did the size of the complex. Qasr al-‘Ishshah exhibits some of the finest examples of lime plaster decoration (''malas'') in Tarim. The decorative program of the exterior south façade finds its antecedents in Mughal royal architecture, as well as the colonial forms of the Near East, South Asia and Southeast Asia. Interior stucco decoration differs from room to room, including Art Nouveau, Rococo, Neo-Classical and combinations of the three. Myntii 1999 The ornamentation often incorporates pilasters along the walls framing openings, built-in cabinetry with skilled wood carvings, elaborate column capitals, decorated ceilings, niches and kerosene lamp holders, as well as complex color schemes. From 1970 to 1991, Qasr al-‘Ishshah was expropriated by the PDRY and divided up as multi-family housing. The house was recently returned to the al-Kaf family and legal ownership rights are shared amongst many of Shaikh al-Kaf’s descendents. In 1997, the Historical Society for the Preservation of Tarim rented half of the house in order to present the building to the public as a house museum, the only one of its kind in the Hadhramaut. Tarim Conservation Project: Report 2002. Columbia University Education Rabat Tarim Rabat Tarim is an educational institution teaching Islamic and Arabic sciences. In 1886, a group of Tarimi notables decided to build a religious institution for foreign and domestic students in Tarim, and accommodate foreign students. Those notables were Mohammed bin Salem Assri, Ahmed bin Omar al-Shatri, Abdul-Qader bin Ahmed al-Haddad, Ahmed bin Abdul-Rahman al-Junēd and Mohammed bin Omar Arfan. (100 feet) high, thus being early high-rise apartment buildings. In order to protect the buildings from rain and erosion, the walls must be routinely maintained by applying fresh layers of mud. The nearby town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) contains the tallest structure in the Wadi Hadhramaut valley, the mudbrick minaret of the Al-Mihdhar mosque. It stands at a height of approximately 53 meters (175 feet.) This is the tallest minaret in the southern Arabian peninsula. p. 9, ''The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9 11 to the Eavesdropping on America'', James Bamford, Random House, Inc., 2009, ISBN 0-307-27939-1. '''Imam Abd Allah ibn Alawi al-Haddad''' born in 1634 CE (1044 Hijri). He lived his entire life in the town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) in Yemen’s Valley of Hadramawt and died there in 1720 CE (1132 Hijri). In Islamic history, he was considered one of the sages. He was an adherent to the Ashari Sunni Creed of Faith (Aqeedah), while in Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh), he was a Shafii.


architectural history

and architecture) typological and aesthetic changes. In this way Tarimi architectural history represents a dialogue between cultures both within and outside of the modern nation. Mosques and libraries It is estimated that Tarim contains up to 365 ''masājid'' (mosques); one, the Sirjis mosque, dates back to the seventh century. From the 17th to the 19th century, these mosques played a decisive role on the influence of Islamic scholarship in the area. Tarim’s famous al-Muhdar mosque is crowned by a 46-meter-high mud minaret (150 ft), the highest in Yemen. The minaret was designed by the local poets Abu Bakr bin Shihab and Alawi Al Mash’hūr. Completed in 1914, the al-Muhdar mosque is named in honor of Omar Al-Muhdar, a Muslim leader who lived in the city during the 15th century. Tarim...the town of mosques and schools. ''Yemen Times'', November 2005 Tarim also features the massive al-Kaf Library which is attached to the Al-Jame’a Mosque and houses more than 5,000 manuscripts from the region covering religion, the thoughts of the Prophets, Islamic law, Sufism, medicine, astronomy, agriculture, biographies, history, mathematics, philosophy, logic, and the eight volumes of Abū Muhammad al-Hasan al-Hamdānī’s ''Al-Iklil'' (crown). Many go back hundreds of years and often contain vibrantly colored illustration. Between 300 to 400 manuscripts are believed to be unique in the Islamic world, according to the scholar Abd al-Qader Sabban. Breton, J. Manhattan in the Hadhramaut. ''Saudi Aramco World'' (June 1986) pages 22–27 What distinguishes these manuscripts is that the majority belong to Yemeni authors and editors who resided in the Wadi Hadhramaut area. Nevertheless, there are others that belonged to scholars from Morocco, Khurasan (Greater Khorasan), and other Muslim regions. In 1996, estimates for the annual number of visitors to the Al-Kaf Library exceeded 4,780 individuals. Tarimi Palaces Tarim is famous for its innumerable palaces – a collection of approximately thirty mansions constructed between the 1870s and 1930s. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Hadhramaut’s merchant families grew rich from trade and investments abroad. The al-Kaf family was considered the most influential. Many members of the family were respected religious scholars. At the same time, they were among the regions first Western (Western culture)izing elite and contributed to public works projects in the name of modernization. Their palaces remain as testament to both their affluence and the complex identity of the modernizing elite of the colonial (Colonialism) period. Palaces financed by the al-Kafs and other families were executed in the stylistic idioms they encountered in British India and Southeast Asia. Consequently, the palaces include examples of Mughal (Mughal architecture), British Colonial, Art Nouveau, Deco, Rococo, Neo-Classical (Neoclassical architecture), and Modernist styles unparalleled in Yemen. While these foreign decorative styles were incorporated into the Tarimi architectural idiom, traditional Hadhrami construction techniques based on the thousand-year-old traditions of unfired mud brick and lime plasters served as the primary methods for executing these buildings. Qasr al-‘Ishshah Complex The complex of ‘Umar bin Shaikh al-Kaf, Qasr al-‘Ishshah is one of the original al-Kaf houses in Tarim. Shaikh al-Kaf built the house on proceeds made in South Asian trade and investment in Singapore’s ''Grand Hotel de l'Europe'' during the 1930s. Clarence-Smith, W. Middle Eastern Entrepreneurs in Southeast Asia, University of London ‘Ishshah derives from the Arabic root ‘-sh-sh meaning to nest, take root, or establish. Qasr al-‘Ishshah is a collection of several buildings constructed over a forty year period. The first building, known as Dar Dawil, was constructed during the 1890s. As Umar’s family grew, so did the size of the complex. Qasr al-‘Ishshah exhibits some of the finest examples of lime plaster decoration (''malas'') in Tarim. The decorative program of the exterior south façade finds its antecedents in Mughal royal architecture, as well as the colonial forms of the Near East, South Asia and Southeast Asia. Interior stucco decoration differs from room to room, including Art Nouveau, Rococo, Neo-Classical and combinations of the three. Myntii 1999 The ornamentation often incorporates pilasters along the walls framing openings, built-in cabinetry with skilled wood carvings, elaborate column capitals, decorated ceilings, niches and kerosene lamp holders, as well as complex color schemes. From 1970 to 1991, Qasr al-‘Ishshah was expropriated by the PDRY and divided up as multi-family housing. The house was recently returned to the al-Kaf family and legal ownership rights are shared amongst many of Shaikh al-Kaf’s descendents. In 1997, the Historical Society for the Preservation of Tarim rented half of the house in order to present the building to the public as a house museum, the only one of its kind in the Hadhramaut. Tarim Conservation Project: Report 2002. Columbia University Education Rabat Tarim Rabat Tarim is an educational institution teaching Islamic and Arabic sciences. In 1886, a group of Tarimi notables decided to build a religious institution for foreign and domestic students in Tarim, and accommodate foreign students. Those notables were Mohammed bin Salem Assri, Ahmed bin Omar al-Shatri, Abdul-Qader bin Ahmed al-Haddad, Ahmed bin Abdul-Rahman al-Junēd and Mohammed bin Omar Arfan. (100 feet) high, thus being early high-rise apartment buildings. In order to protect the buildings from rain and erosion, the walls must be routinely maintained by applying fresh layers of mud. The nearby town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) contains the tallest structure in the Wadi Hadhramaut valley, the mudbrick minaret of the Al-Mihdhar mosque. It stands at a height of approximately 53 meters (175 feet.) This is the tallest minaret in the southern Arabian peninsula. p. 9, ''The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9 11 to the Eavesdropping on America'', James Bamford, Random House, Inc., 2009, ISBN 0-307-27939-1. '''Imam Abd Allah ibn Alawi al-Haddad''' born in 1634 CE (1044 Hijri). He lived his entire life in the town of Tarim (Tarim, Yemen) in Yemen’s Valley of Hadramawt and died there in 1720 CE (1132 Hijri). In Islamic history, he was considered one of the sages. He was an adherent to the Ashari Sunni Creed of Faith (Aqeedah), while in Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh), he was a Shafii.


social life

and Islamic traditions determines the social life of its inhabitants. Apart from urban (Urban area) settlements, Hadhramaut is still tribalised, although tribal bonds are no longer as powerful as they once were. Hadhramis live in densely built towns centered on traditional watering stations along the wadis. Hadhramis harvest crops of wheat, millet, tend date palm and coconut groves, and grow some coffee. On the plateau Bedouins tend sheep and goats. The ''Sayyid


culture amp

increase Tarim’s scholars and water, as its citizens stood with him during the Ridda wars after the Prophet’s death (632-633). A battle occurred in the Al-Nujir fortress in which many of the Prophet’s companions (Sahaba) were injured and taken to Tarim for treatment. Some ''sahabi'' were martyred and buried in Zambal Cemetery in Tarim. Ba Udhan, H. culture&a 1 Tarim at a Glance

by a 46-meter-high mud minaret (150 ft), the highest in Yemen. The minaret was designed by the local poets Abu Bakr bin Shihab and Alawi Al Mash’hūr. Completed in 1914, the al-Muhdar mosque is named in honor of Omar Al-Muhdar, a Muslim leader who lived in the city during the 15th century.culture&a 1 Tarim...the town of mosques and schools. ''Yemen Times'', November 2005 Tarim also features the massive

Tarim, Yemen

'''Tarim''' ( '') is a historic town situated in the Hadhramaut Valley (Hadhramaut) of South Yemen, South Arabia. Tarim is widely acknowledged as the theological, juridical, and academic center of the Hadhramaut Valley. An important focus of Islamic learning, it is estimated to contain the highest concentration of descendants (Ba 'Alawi sada) of the Islamic prophet (Prophets in Islam) Muhammad (''sayyids'') anywhere in the world. Alexandroni, S. No Room at the Inn. ''New Statesman'', October 2007 The city is distinguished for producing numerous Islamic scholars, including Imam al-Haddad. Additionally, Tarim is also home to Dar al-Mustafa, a well-known educational institute for the study of traditional Islamic Sciences.

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