Szczecin

What is Szczecin known for?


political quot

the political "thaw" known as Polish October, Boniecka was chosen to be the first editor of the socio-literary weekly ''Ziemia i Morze (:pl:Ziemia i Morze)'' (Land and Sea) in the city of Szczecin. In 1957, she was removed from this position ''in absentia'', for "political transgressions regarding the issue of Hungary (Hungarian Revolution of 1956), censorship, elections, inadequate condemnation of erroneous tendencies, failing to consult with the State Committee (KW


local building''

in the extreme right Rossbach Freikorps. From 1919 to 1923, he studied civil engineering at the Technische Hochschule der Freien Stadt Danzig (Gdańsk University of Technology) and Munich, and was awarded his Dr. Ing. in November 1932, following some years of practical work in local building administration.

, following some years of practical work in local building administration. DATE OF BIRTH 1901 PLACE OF BIRTH Stettin (Szczecin), Germany DATE OF DEATH 1945 *Freight: In 1985 about 81 % of long


popular public

, Dublin, Oslo, Edinburgh), as well as seasonal charter flights to other destinations. Airport webpage information as of November, 2012 There is also a grass airstrip within city limits, the Szczecin-Dąbie Airstrip. Buses and Trams There is a popular public transit (public transport) system operating throughout Szczecin, including a bus network and electric Tramways in Szczecin trams


knowledge based

, Integra, continued development of rendering software in close cooperation with the scientists from the company Voxel in his homeland city of Szczecin where the '''TBT''' (Turbo Beam Tracing) software was developed. Akira Fujimoto, "Turbo Beam Tracing – A Physically Accurate Lighting Simulation Environment", ''Knowledge Based Image Computing Systems'', pp. 1–5, May 20, 1988 This fact was the base of allegations in industrial espionage, because the counter


cultural reasons

Commons:Szczecin Wikipedia:Szczecin Dmoz:Regional Europe Poland Voivodships Western Pomerania Szczecin


vocal performances

with a professor Eugenia Falkowska in Warsaw. Her 5-octave vocal range and timbre abilities were significant, worthy of a promising operatic career, but she had decided to pursue more contemporary forms of music, touring and giving vocal performances on stage.


water connection

, Ereignisse volume 41 series Veröffentlichungen der Historischen Kommission für Pommern edition 2 publisher Böhlau location Köln-Weimar year 2009 isbn 3-412-20436-6 language German pages 19–20 Major industries prospering in Stettin since 1840 were shipbuilding, chemical and food industries and machinery construction. Starting in 1843, Stettin became connected to the major German and Pomeranian cities by railways, and the water connection to the Bay of Pomerania was enhanced by the construction of the Kaiserfahrt (now Piast) canal. On 20 October 1890, some of the city's Poles created the Towarzystwo Robotników Polsko Katolickich (Society of Polish-Catholic Workers) in the city, one of the first Polish organisations. Dzieje Szczecina:1806-1945 page 450 Bogdan Frankiewicz 1994 In 1897, the ship works near the city, began working on the Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse. In 1914, before World War I, the Polish community in the city numbered over 3,000 people. These were primarily industrial workers and their families who came from the Poznań (Posen) area Commons:Szczecin Wikipedia:Szczecin Dmoz:Regional Europe Poland Voivodships Western Pomerania Szczecin


long annual

lakes areas. West Pomerania is also rich in various forms and styles of architecture that were built during the Middle Ages as well as the Gothic, Baroque, and Renaissance periods. There is a diverse repertoire of theaters, festivals, museums and galleries. During a few-day long annual Sea Festival in Szczecin, a number of free open air concerts take place. In Świnoujście during the summer, the FAMA Academic Youth Arts Festival takes place – an event with several years


power+based

, her family had very little money. Catherine was to come to power based on her mother's relations to wealthy members of royalty. Streeter, Michael. Catherine the Great (Haus Publishing, 2007), 3. : Helsingborg … Helsingør – Copenhagen – Køge – Vordingborg – Farø – Nykøbing Falster – Gedser … Rostock


population serving

a Swedish fortress (Swedish Pomerania) until 1720 (Treaty of Stockholm (Great Northern War)), when it was acquired by the Kingdom of Prussia and became capital of the Province of Pomerania (Province of Pomerania (1653–1815)), which after 1870 was part of the German Empire. In the late 19th century, Stettin became an industrial town, and vastly increased in size and population, serving as a major port for Berlin. During the Nazi era (Nazi Germany), opposition groups and minorities were persecuted and treated as enemies. At the end of World War II Stettin's status was in doubt, and the Soviet occupation authorities at first appointed officials from the city's almost entirely German pre-war population. In July 1945, however, Polish authorities were permitted to take power. Stettin was renamed Szczecin and became part of the People's Republic of Poland, and from 1989 the Republic of Poland. After the flight and expulsion of the German population (Expulsion of Germans from Poland during and after World War II) and Polish settlement, Szczecin became the administrative and industrial center of Polish Western Pomerania (Zachodniopomorskie), the site of the University of Szczecin, Pomeranian Medical University, Maritime University of Szczecin, West Pomeranian University of Technology and Art Academy of Szczecin, and the see of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Szczecin-Kamień. Name and its etymology Commons:Szczecin Wikipedia:Szczecin Dmoz:Regional Europe Poland Voivodships Western Pomerania Szczecin

Szczecin

motto "Szczecin jest otwarty" (''"Szczecin is open"'') image_skyline Collage of Szczecin.png imagesize 250px image_caption ''Top:'' Jagiellońska Street, Hey Market and Old Town Hall (Old Town Hall, Szczecin) ''Middle:'' The Oder (Oder River), Sea Museum (National Museum, Szczecin) and Voivodeship Office ''Bottom:'' St James' Cathedral (Cathedral Basilica of St. James the Apostle, Szczecin), Virgin Tower, PAZIM (pazim) building image_flag POL Szczecin flag.svg image_shield POL Szczecin COA.svg pushpin_map Poland pushpin_label_position bottom coordinates_region PL subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Voivodeship (Voivodeships of Poland) subdivision_name1 West Pomeranian (West Pomeranian Voivodeship) subdivision_type2 County (Powiat) subdivision_name2 ''city county'' leader_title Mayor leader_name Piotr Krzystek established_title Established established_date 8th century established_title3 Town rights established_date3 1243 area_total_km2 301 population_as_of 2012 population_total 409 211 population_density_km2 auto population_metro 777000 timezone CET (Central European Time) utc_offset +1 timezone_DST CEST (Central European Summer Time) utc_offset_DST +2 latd 53 latm 25 lats 57 latNS N longd 14 longm 32 longs 53 longEW E postal_code_type Postal code postal_code PL-70-017 to 71-871 area_code +48 91 website http: www.szczecin.pl blank_name Car plates (Vehicle registration plates of Poland) blank_info ZS

'''Szczecin''' (

Szczecin is located on the Oder River, south of the Szczecin Lagoon and the Bay of Pomerania. The city is situated along the southwestern shore of Dąbie Lake, on both sides of the Oder and on several large islands between the western and eastern branches of the river. Szczecin borders directly with the town of Police (Police, Poland) and is the urban center of the Szczecin agglomeration, that includes communities in the German states (States of Germany) of Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

The city's history began in the 8th century with a Slavic Pomeranian (Pomeranians (Slavic tribe)) stronghold, built at the site of today's castle (Ducal Castle, Szczecin). In the 12th century, when Szczecin had become one of Pomerania's main urban centres, it lost its independence to Piast Poland, Saxony (Duchy of Saxony), the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark (History of Denmark). At the same time, the Griffin dynasty (House of Pomerania) established themselves as local rulers, the population was converted (Conversion of Pomerania) to Christianity, and German settlers (Ostsiedlung) arrived. The native Slavic population was assimilated and sometimes discriminated against in the following centuries. Between 1237 and 1243, the town was built anew, granted vast autonomy rights (Magdeburg rights), and eventually joined the Hanseatic League.

After the Treaty of Stettin (Treaty of Stettin (1630)) in 1630, the town came under Swedish control. It was fortified and remained a Swedish fortress (Swedish Pomerania) until 1720 (Treaty of Stockholm (Great Northern War)), when it was acquired by the Kingdom of Prussia and became capital of the Province of Pomerania (Province of Pomerania (1653–1815)), which after 1870 was part of the German Empire. In the late 19th century, Stettin became an industrial town, and vastly increased in size and population, serving as a major port for Berlin. During the Nazi era (Nazi Germany), opposition groups and minorities were persecuted and treated as enemies. At the end of World War II Stettin's status was in doubt, and the Soviet occupation authorities at first appointed officials from the city's almost entirely German pre-war population. In July 1945, however, Polish authorities were permitted to take power. Stettin was renamed Szczecin and became part of the People's Republic of Poland, and from 1989 the Republic of Poland.

After the flight and expulsion of the German population (Expulsion of Germans from Poland during and after World War II) and Polish settlement, Szczecin became the administrative and industrial center of Polish Western Pomerania (Zachodniopomorskie), the site of the University of Szczecin, Pomeranian Medical University, Maritime University of Szczecin, West Pomeranian University of Technology and Art Academy of Szczecin, and the see of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Szczecin-Kamień.

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