Summerland, British Columbia

What is Summerland, British Columbia known for?


diverse past

the Grand Chief Nicola. A published map of the Okanagan Valley in 1827 includes only three sites for the entire Okanagan Valley; Nicola Prairie; Lone Tree (north end of Summerland); and Sandy Cove (across the lake from present day Kelowna). Summerland's proud and diverse past includes hunting and fur trading, ranching, orchards and fruit industries, transportation hubs and more recently, tourism. Immigration to the Summerland area commenced in the late 1880s when the first settlers arrived and began


significant industry

2011. Tourism Summerland is popular because of its idyllic situation on Okanagan Lake and sandy beaches, a playground for three major Canadian population centres (Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton). Both tourism and tourist attractions are a significant industry. Agriculture


important population

Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district


sports team

Lake (Naramata). West Summerland (present day Downtown Summerland) experienced increased importance also in part due to a 1922 fire which destroyed many of the lakeside buildings in Lower Town. Sport Summerland has few non-minor sports teams. The Summerland Steam is the most popular of Summerland's sports team. Minor Ice hockey side


early quot

at a branch in Summerland, British Columbia. At 14-years-old, his family moved once again to nearby Penticton, British Columbia, The '''Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen''' ('''RDOS''') is a regional district in southern British Columbia, adjacent to the U.S. (United States of America) state of Washington (Washington (U.S. state)). It is bounded by Fraser Valley Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census (Canada 2006 Census) the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland (Summerland, British Columbia), the towns of Oliver (Oliver, British Columbia), Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia), and Princeton (Princeton, British Columbia), and the village of Keremeos (Keremeos, British Columbia).


quot early

at a branch in Summerland, British Columbia. At 14-years-old, his family moved once again to nearby Penticton, British Columbia, where he finished his last two years of minor hockey. He then earned a spot on the local Junior hockey Junior


668

, Canada G.K. Gilbert himself first described this type of delta on Lake Bonneville in 1885. "Geological and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-deltaic Reservoir". By Thomas C. Chidsey, Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr (ed), Utah Geological Survey, 2002. ISBN 1-55791-668-3. Pages 2–17. Partial text on Google Books. Elsewhere, similar structures can


high+track

in Midway (Midway, British Columbia). An additional branch line connected to Spences Bridge, British Columbia, and Merritt, British Columbia. This portion was eventually adopted as the main portion of the railroad when the portion of the original railroad between Hope and Brookmere via the Coquihalla Valley was abandoned due to high track maintenance costs. Additional spur lines connected Copper Mountain with Princeton, Osoyoos, British Columbia, and Oliver, British Columbia


cherries

. Agriculture, featuring fresh tree fruits (peaches, cherries, apples and pears), and canneries, were the economic engine of the region until the late 20th Century, when focus shifted away from tree fruits and over to grape production in support of the wine industry. Now, Summerland finds itself home to several world renowned wineries, and despite being in an arid desert climate, has several golf courses. Summerland is also home to the historic Kettle Valley Steam Railway. Climate


cultural development

Development type XLS (Microsoft Excel) accessdate November 2, 2014 native_name nickname Town of Festivals settlement_type District municipality (List of district municipalities in British Columbia) motto image_skyline Summerland, British Columbia.JPG imagesize image_caption A view of Summerland image_flag flag_size image_seal seal_size

Summerland, British Columbia

1921 (Canada 1921 Census) 1892 1931 1791 1941 2054 1951 3567 1956 3893 1961 4307 1966 4585 1971 5551 1976 6724 1981 7473 1986 7755 1991 9253 1996 (Canada 1996 Census) 10584 2001 (Canada 2001 Census) 10713 2006 (Canada 2006 Census) 10828 2011 (Canada 2011 Census) 11280 footnote Sources: Statistics Canada

'''Summerland''' (2011 population 11,280) is a town on the west side of Okanagan Lake in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. The district is between Peachland (Peachland, British Columbia) to the north and Penticton to the south. The largest centre in the region is Kelowna, approximately 50 km to the north (via Highway 97 (British Columbia Highway 97)), and Vancouver is approximately away to the west. The district is famous for "Bottleneck drive", a system of roads connecting a large number of wineries.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017