Southern Tang

What is Southern Tang known for?


multiple theories

;Northern Han - The Tang Dynasty collapsed in 907, heralding the division of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. Jiangxi first belonged to Wu (Wu (Ten Kingdoms)) (吳, Gan: Ng), then to Southern Tang (南唐, Gan: Nām-thóng). Both states were based in modern-day Nanjing, further down the Yangtze River. Origins Multiple theories attempt to explain the origin of foot binding, from the desire to emulate the naturally tiny feet of a favored concubine of a prince, to a story of an empress who had club-like feet, which became viewed as a desirable fashion. However, there is little strong textual evidence for the custom prior to the court of the Southern Tang kingdom in Nanjing (937–975), which celebrated the fame of its dancing girls, renowned for their tiny feet and beautiful bow shoes. What is clear is that foot binding was first practiced among the elite and only in the wealthiest parts of China, which suggests that binding the feet of well-born girls represented their freedom from manual labor. This implied that the future husbands of such girls could afford wives who did not need to work, who existed solely to serve their men and direct household servants while performing no labor themselves. ) from the Song Dynasty (960–1279) describes a game called ''chuíwán (Chuiwan)'' (捶丸) and also includes drawings of the game. It was played with 10 clubs including a ''cuanbang'', ''pubang'', and ''shaobang'', which are comparable to a driver, two-wood, and three-wood. Clubs were inlaid with jade and gold, suggesting chuíwán was for the wealthy. Chinese archive includes references to a Southern Tang official who asked his daughter to dig holes as a target. Ling suggested chuíwán was exported to Europe and then Scotland by Mongolian (Mongols) travellers in the late Middle Ages.


958'

939 event2 Became a vassal of Later Zhou date_event2 958 event3 Renamed from "Tang" to "Jiangnan" date_event3 971 event4 date_event4 event_pre date_pre event_post date_post p1 Wu (Ten Kingdoms) s1 Song Dynasty image_flag flag

squabbles. The Southern Tang sent in an army in 951 and removed the ruling family to their own capital in Nanjing, and absorbed the territory. However, Li Jing suffered a setback from the Later Zhou between 956 and 958, and ceded away all of its land north of the Yangtze River. Li Jing became a vassal of the Later Zhou. The Last Ruler Li Yu (Li Houzhu) took over the state upon the death of his father in 961. The Song dynasty had conquered the northern part of the state located

tedious thus not used when referring to this sovereign Li Jing 961-975 (Under Li Yu


quot period

in Southern Tang Kingdom 937-975''' - ! style "background:#efefef;" Temple Names ! style "background:#efefef;" Posthumous Names ! style "background:#efefef;" Personal Names ! style "background:#efefef;" Period of Reigns ! style "background:#efefef;" Reign periods (Chinese era name) and dates - colspan "5" align "center" ''Convention'' '''''for this kingdom only''''' '': Nan (Southern) Tang + posthumous names


932

''' – Qian Yuanguan, King of Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms)) (932–941) ** '''Southern Han''' – Liu Yan (Liu Yan (Southern Han)), Emperor of Southern Han (Southern Han) (917–941) ** '''Southern Tang''' – Liezu (Emperor Liezu of Southern Tang), Emperor of Southern Tang (Southern Tang) (937–943) ** '''Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Qian Yuanguan, King of Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms)) (932–941) ** '''Southern Han''' – Liu Yan (Liu Yan (Southern Han)), Southern Han

Emperor of Southern Han (917–941) ** '''Southern Tang''' – Liezu (Emperor Liezu of Southern Tang), Emperor of Southern Tang (Southern Tang) (937–943) ** '''Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Qian Yuanguan, King of Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms)) (932–941) ** '''Southern Han''' – Liu Yan (Liu Yan (Southern Han)), Emperor of Southern Han (Southern Han) (917–941) ** '''Southern Tang''' – Liezu (Emperor Liezu of Southern Tang), Emperor of Southern Tang (Southern Tang) (937

–943) ** '''Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Qian Yuanguan, King of Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms)) (932–941) ** '''Pinghai (Pinghai Jiedushi)''' – Chen Hongjin, Pinghai (Pinghai Jiedushi) Jiedushi (963–978) ** '''Southern Tang''' – Li Houzhu, Ruler of Southern Tang (Southern Tang) (961–975) ** '''Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Qian Chu, King of Wuyue (Wuyue (Ten Kingdoms)) (947–978) ** '''Qingyuan (Qingyuan Jiedushi)''' – Chen Hongjin, Qingyuan


978'

Liy Liy Li Yu 李煜 937–978 '''Houzhu (Li Yu (Southern Tang)) 后主''' 961–975 *

University Press year 1999 pages 14–16 isbn -0674012127 * Category:Southern Tang

by the Southern Tang Kingdom in China. * The Northern Han Kingdom is founded by Liu Min in northern China. * Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi, Moorish scholar * Li Houzhu, last Chinese emperor of the Southern Tang (d. 978) The Song navy was of great importance during the consolidation of the empire in the 10th century; during the war against the Southern Tang state the Song navy employed tactics such as defending large floating pontoon bridges across


growing power

as founders of his state. See ''Zizhi Tongjian'', vol. 282 (:zh:s:資治通鑑 卷282). Ascension to the throne Li Houzhu’s father Li Jing (Zhongzhu of Southern Tang), the second ruler of the Southern Tang, died in 961. Li ascended the throne in 961, accepting a role subservient to the Song Dynasty to the north; as the Southern Tang state at this time was, in many respects, little more than a regional ruler in the face of the growing power of the Song Dynasty. Fall of the Southern Tang Kingdom Of the many other kingdoms surrounding the Southern Tang, only Wuyue to the east had yet to fall. The Southern Tang’s turn came in 974, when, after several refusals to summons to the Song court, on the excuse of illness, Song Dynasty armies invaded. After a year long siege of the Southern Tang capital, modern Nanjing, Li Houzhu surrendered, in 975; and, he and his family were taken as captives to the Song (Song Dynasty) capital at present-day Kaifeng Wu, 213 . ) from the Song Dynasty (960–1279) describes a game called ''chuíwán (Chuiwan)'' (捶丸) and also includes drawings of the game. It was played with 10 clubs including a ''cuanbang'', ''pubang'', and ''shaobang'', which are comparable to a driver, two-wood, and three-wood. Clubs were inlaid with jade and gold, suggesting chuíwán was for the wealthy. Chinese archive includes references to a Southern Tang official who asked his daughter to dig holes as a target. Ling suggested chuíwán was exported to Europe and then Scotland by Mongolian (Mongols) travellers in the late Middle Ages.


incorporating

holdings. Seeing the threat posed by the Southern Tang, the Min court declared its allegiance to the Wuyue kingdom to its north. However, this did not stop the Southern Tang from marching in and incorporating the remainder of the Min Kingdom into its holdings in 945 Seeing the threat posed by the Southern Tang, the Min court declared its allegiance to the Wuyue kingdom to its north. However, this did not stop the Southern Tang from marching in and incorporating


920

! : :

Youliang . At the beginning of the 16th century it was the power base from which Zhu Chenhao, the prince of Ning, launched a rebellion against the Ming regime. ''Shuowen'' scholarship improved greatly during the Southern Tang-Song (Song Dynasty) Dynasties and later during the Qing Dynasty. The most important Northern Song scholars were the Xú brothers, Xú Xuàn (徐鉉, 916-991) and Xú Kǎi (徐鍇, 920-74). In 986, Emperor Taizong of Song ordered Xú Xuàn and other editors to publish


defending large

by the Southern Tang Kingdom in China. * The Northern Han Kingdom is founded by Liu Min in northern China. * Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi, Moorish scholar * Li Houzhu, last Chinese emperor of the Southern Tang (d. 978) The Song navy was of great importance during the consolidation of the empire in the 10th century; during the war against the Southern Tang state the Song navy employed tactics such as defending large floating pontoon bridges across


976

of the Later Zhou and gave up the emperor status. -- empire Later Zhou government_type Monarchy year_start 937 year_end 976 year_exile_start year_exile_end event_start Coup d'etat date_start 937 event_end Surrendered to Song (Song Dynasty) date_end 976 event1 Renamed from "Qi" to "Tang" date_event1

leader1 Emperor Liezu (Li Bian) leader2 Emperor Yuanzong (Li Jing (Southern Tang)) leader3 King of Jiangnan (Li Yu (Southern Tang)) leader4 year_leader1 937-943 year_leader2 943-961 year_leader3 961-976 year_leader4 title_leader Emperor King (Southern Tang#Rulers) deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

stat_area5 stat_pop5 footnotes today ; also referred to as '''Nantang'''), later known as '''Jiangnan''' (江南), was one of the Ten Kingdoms in south-central China created following the Tang Dynasty from 937–976. Southern Tang replaced the Wu (Wu (Ten Kingdoms)) Kingdom when Li Bian (a.k.a. Xu Zhigao) deposed the emperor Yang Pu

Southern Tang

'''Southern Tang''' ( ; also referred to as '''Nantang'''), later known as '''Jiangnan''' (江南), was one of the Ten Kingdoms in south-central China created following the Tang Dynasty from 937–976. Southern Tang replaced the Wu (Wu (Ten Kingdoms)) Kingdom when Li Bian (a.k.a. Xu Zhigao) deposed the emperor Yang Pu.

The capital was located in Jinling (also known as Xidu), located in present-day Nanjing in Jiangsu Province. The territory comprised parts of modern Fujian, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces and the whole of Jiangxi Province.

Southern Tang was conquered in 976 by the Northern Song Dynasty.

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