Southern Qi

What is Southern Qi known for?


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. 493) Asia * Summer – The Song Dynasty (Song Dynasty (420-479)) ends and the Southern Qi Dynasty (Southern Qi) begins in southern China. Emperor Shun Di (Emperor Shun of Liu Song) is forced to abandon the throne and Qi Gao Di (Emperor Gao of Southern Qi) becomes the first ruler of Southern Qi. Later he and empress Wang Zhenfeng (Empress Wang Zhenfeng) are killed by the imperial guard, near the vicinity of the capital Jiankang. Births * Xiao Zhaoye, Chinese emperor of Southern Qi (known as the '''Prince of Yulin''') (d. 494) Births * Xiao Ni, prince of Southern Qi (d. 492) -align "center" Southern Qi Jiankang 7 Xiao Daocheng (Emperor Gao of Southern Qi) Xiao Baorong (Emperor He of Southern Qi) 479 AD 502 AD -align "center" thumb left A scene of two horseback riders from a wall painting in the tomb of Lou Rui at Taiyuan, Shanxi, Northern Qi (Image:Riders on Horseback, Northern Qi Dynasty.jpg) Dynasty (550–577) The Jin were supplanted by the Liu Song (420–479 AD), the Southern Qi (479–502 AD), the Liang Dynasty (502–557 AD), and then the Chen Dynasty (557–589 AD). Because all of these dynasties had their capital at Jiankang (with the exception of Liang after they moved their capital), they are sometimes grouped together with Eastern Wu and Eastern Jin as the Six Dynasties. The rulers of these short-lived dynasties were generals who seized and then held power for several decades, but were unable to securely pass power of rule onto their heirs to continue their dynasty successfully. Emperor Wu of Liang (502–549 AD), however, was the most notable ruler of his age, being a patron of the arts and of Buddhism. Under the later waning leadership of the Chen Dynasty, the southern Chinese were unable to resist the military power amassed in the north by Yang Jian, who declared himself Emperor Wen of Sui and invaded the south to reunify China. Once Vietnam did succumb to foreign rule, however, it proved unable to escape from it, and for 1,100 years, Vietnam had been successively governed by a series of foreign powers (Historical powers): the Hans (Han Dynasty), Eastern Hans, Eastern Wus, Cao Wei, Jins (Jin Dynasty (265–420)), Liu Songs (Liu Song Dynasty), Southern Qis, Liangs (Liang Dynasty), Suis (Sui Dynasty), Tangs (Tang Dynasty), and Southern Hans; leading to the losses of its writing system, language, and national identity. At certain periods during these 1,100 years, Vietnam was independently governed under the Triệus (Triệu Dynasty), Trưng Sisters, Anterior Lýs (Lý Nam Đế), Khúcs (Khúc family) and Dương Đình Nghệ - although their triumphs and reigns were brief. - '''Qi (Southern Qi)''' ('''Southern dynasties''') Jiankang (建康) 479—502 - Overlooking Luoyang on Mount Huanyuan was the Cypress Valley Estate, which had served as the site of a fort during the Jin (Jin Dynasty (265-420)) and a commandery during the Southern Qi. ) was born in Wuyin (舞阴) (in the northwest of today’s Biyang County (泌阳县), Zhumadian Prefect, Henan Province) and lived during the Southern Qi dynasty. He learned to write poems at the age of eight and had a quick wit. He was a personal friend of Emperor Wu (Emperor Wu of Liang), and was held authority as his prime minister without actually being so titled.


488

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, and this drew several major rebellions, the last of which, by his general Xiao Yan (Emperor Wu of Liang), overthrew him and eventually his dynasty, with Xiao Yan establishing Liang Dynasty. He is known as the Marquess of Donghun because Xiao Yan demoted him to that title after he was killed in a siege of the capital Jiankang. '''Emperor He of Southern Qi''' ((南)齊和帝) (488–502), personal name '''Xiao Baorong''' (蕭寶融), courtesy name '''Zhizhao''' (智昭), was the last emperor


quick wit

, which includes the ancient Manchurian, Korean and Japanese history such as Goguryeo, Baekje, Gaya (Gaya confederacy) and Wa (Japan). 欽定四庫全書, 南齊書卷五十八, 蠻, 東南夷, 東夷 * History of Southern Dynasties ) was born in Wuyin (舞阴) (in the northwest of today’s Biyang County (泌阳县), Zhumadian Prefect, Henan Province) and lived during the Southern Qi dynasty. He learned to write poems at the age of eight and had a quick wit. He was a personal friend of Emperor Wu (Emperor Wu of Liang), and was held authority as his prime minister without actually being so titled.


modern great

; * Southern and Northern Dynasty * Chinese sovereign * Yongming poetry *List of Bronze Age States *List of Classical Age States *List of Iron Age States *List of pre-modern great powers 01 (Category:Southern Qi) Category:Southern and Northern Dynasties Category:Former countries in Chinese history Yūryaku is believed to be referred to as ''Bu'' (武, In Japanese, it is read as Take or Takeru) in contemporary Chinese


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--- p2 flag_p2 p3 flag_p3 p4 flag_p4 p5 flag_p5 s1 Liang Dynasty flag_s1 image_s1 s2 flag_s2


history book

, Southern Qi, Northern Wei, Sui Dynasty, and Tang Dynasty. Pei Yaoqing's grandfather Pei Shen (裴慎) served as a county magistrate during Tang, and his father Pei Shouzhen (裴守真) served as a prefectural prefect. ''New Book of Tang'', vol. 71. Book of Qi : The Book of Qi is the history book of Southern Qi. In the 58th volume, the history of Dongyi's history is described


military support

records. These records state that Bu began his rule before 477, was recognized as the ruler of Japan by the Liu Song, Southern Qi, and Liang (Liang Dynasty) dynasties, and continued his rule through to 502. Bu sent messengers to the Song dynasty in 477 and 478 to ask for military support for protecting Baekje against the threat of Goguryeo. Aston, William. (1998). ''Nihongi,'' Vol. 1, pp. 333-372. South Korean scholar So Jin Cheol claim that Bu is not Yūryaku


year history

The '''Southern Qi''' ( ) (479-502) was the second of the Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Liang Dynasty. During its 23-year history, the dynasty was largely filled with instability, as after the death of the capable Emperor Gao (Emperor Gao of Southern Qi) and Emperor Wu (Emperor Wu of Southern Qi), Emperor Wu's grandson Xiao Zhaoye was assassinated by Emperor Wu's intelligent but cruel and suspicious cousin Emperor Ming of Southern


494

Emperor Wu of Southern Qi leader3 Xiao Zhaoye leader4 Emperor Ming of Southern Qi leader5 Xiao Baojuan leader6 Emperor He of Southern Qi year_leader1 479-482 year_leader2 482-493 year_leader3 493-494 year_leader4 494-498 year_leader5 499-501 year_leader6 501-502 title_leader Emperor representative1 !--- Name of representative of head of state (eg. colonial governor

Jianyuan (建元 jiàn yuán) 479-482 - Emperor Wu of Southern Qi :(Wu Di 武帝 wǔ dì) Xiao Ze (蕭賾 xiāo zé) 482-493 Yongming (永明 yǒng míng) 483-493 - Prince of Yulin :(Yu Lin Wang 鬱林王 yù lín wáng) Xiao Zhaoye (蕭昭業 xiāo zhāo yè) 493-494 Longchang (隆昌 lóng chāng) 494 - Prince of Hailing :(Hai Ling Wang (海陵王 hài líng wáng) Xiao Zhaowen (蕭昭文 xiāo zhāo wén) 494 Yanxing (延興 yán xīng) 494 - Emperor Ming of Southern Qi - Ming Di :(明帝 míng dì) Xiao Luan (蕭鸞 xiāo luán) 494-498 Jianwu

(建武 jiàn wǔ) 494-498 Yongtai (永泰 yǒng tài) 498 - Marquess of Donghun - Dong Hun Hou :(東昏侯 dōng hūn hóu) Xiao Baojuan (蕭寶卷 xiāo bǎo juǎn) 499-501 Yongyuan (永元 yǒng yuán) 499-501 - Emperor He of Southern Qi - He Di :(和帝 hé dì) Xiao Baorong (蕭寶融 xiāo bào róng) 501-502 Emperor Ming's son Xiao Baoyin, who was then a Northern Wei general, rebelled against Northern Wei and claimed imperial title in 527-528, but is not listed because


498

Emperor Wu of Southern Qi leader3 Xiao Zhaoye leader4 Emperor Ming of Southern Qi leader5 Xiao Baojuan leader6 Emperor He of Southern Qi year_leader1 479-482 year_leader2 482-493 year_leader3 493-494 year_leader4 494-498 year_leader5 499-501 year_leader6 501-502 title_leader Emperor representative1 !--- Name of representative of head of state (eg. colonial governor

Jianyuan (建元 jiàn yuán) 479-482 - Emperor Wu of Southern Qi :(Wu Di 武帝 wǔ dì) Xiao Ze (蕭賾 xiāo zé) 482-493 Yongming (永明 yǒng míng) 483-493 - Prince of Yulin :(Yu Lin Wang 鬱林王 yù lín wáng) Xiao Zhaoye (蕭昭業 xiāo zhāo yè) 493-494 Longchang (隆昌 lóng chāng) 494 - Prince of Hailing :(Hai Ling Wang (海陵王 hài líng wáng) Xiao Zhaowen (蕭昭文 xiāo zhāo wén) 494 Yanxing (延興 yán xīng) 494 - Emperor Ming of Southern Qi - Ming Di :(明帝 míng dì) Xiao Luan (蕭鸞 xiāo luán) 494-498 Jianwu

(建武 jiàn wǔ) 494-498 Yongtai (永泰 yǒng tài) 498 - Marquess of Donghun - Dong Hun Hou :(東昏侯 dōng hūn hóu) Xiao Baojuan (蕭寶卷 xiāo bǎo juǎn) 499-501 Yongyuan (永元 yǒng yuán) 499-501 - Emperor He of Southern Qi - He Di :(和帝 hé dì) Xiao Baorong (蕭寶融 xiāo bào róng) 501-502 Emperor Ming's son Xiao Baoyin, who was then a Northern Wei general, rebelled against Northern Wei and claimed imperial title in 527-528, but is not listed because

Southern Qi

The '''Southern Qi''' ( ) (479-502) was the second of the Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Liang Dynasty. During its 23-year history, the dynasty was largely filled with instability, as after the death of the capable Emperor Gao (Emperor Gao of Southern Qi) and Emperor Wu (Emperor Wu of Southern Qi), Emperor Wu's grandson Xiao Zhaoye was assassinated by Emperor Wu's intelligent but cruel and suspicious cousin Xiao Luan (Emperor Ming of Southern Qi), who took over as Emperor Ming, and proceeded to carry out massive executions of Emperor Gao's and Emperor Wu's sons and grandsons, as well as officials that he suspected of plotting against him. The arbitrariness of these executions was exacerbated after Emperor Ming was succeeded by his son Xiao Baojuan, whose actions drew multiple rebellions, the last of which, by the general Xiao Yan (Emperor Wu of Liang) led to Southern Qi's fall and succession by Xiao Yan's Liang Dynasty.

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