Somaliland

What is Somaliland known for?


important social

Clan system thumb right Distribution of the various Somali people Somali (File:Somalia ethnic grps 2002.jpg) clans. The Somaliland region has a population of about 3.5 million people. The largest clan family in Somaliland are the Isaaq, who are Somalia's third largest ethnic Somali clan. http: www.unhcr.org cgi-bin texis vtx refworld rwmain?page search&docid 3ae6ac0350&skip 0&query isaaq%20clan The clan groupings of the Somali people are important social units, with clan membership playing a central part in Somali culture and politics. Clans are patrilineal (Patrilineality) and are often divided into sub-clans, sometimes with many sub-divisions. Somali society is traditionally ethnically endogamous (endogamy). To extend ties of alliance, marriage is often to another ethnic Somali from a different clan. Thus, for example, a recent study observed that in 89 marriages contracted by men of the Dhulbahante clan, 55 (62%) were with women of Dhulbahante sub-clans other than those of their husbands; 30 (33.7%) were with women of surrounding clans of other clan families (Isaaq, 28; Hawiye, 3); and 3 (4.3%) were with women of other clans of the Darod clan family (Majerteen 2, Ogaden (Ogaden (clan)) 1). Ioan M. Lewis, ''Blood and Bone: The Call of Kinship in Somali Society'', (Red Sea Press: 1994), p.51 The Isaaq constitute the largest Somali clan in most of Somaliland. They are concentrated in the Woqooyi Galbeed and Togdheer regions, alongside the indigenous people of Gabooye and the Muse (Muse clan). The disputed eastern and western regions are predominantly inhabited by other clans. Sool's residents mainly hail from the Dhulbahante, a subdivision of the Harti (Harti (Darod)) confederation of Darod sub-clans. ref


successful industry

Agriculture is generally considered to be a potentially successful industry, especially in the production of cereals and horticulture. Mining also has potential, though simple quarrying represents the extent of current operations, despite the presence of diverse quantities of mineral deposits. Tourism WikiPedia:Somaliland Dmoz:Regional Africa Somalia Somaliland Commons:Somaliland


international community

WikiPedia:Somaliland Dmoz:Regional Africa Somalia Somaliland Commons:Somaliland


show early

art at Laas Geel, situated on the outskirts of Hargeisa, are a popular local tourist attraction. Totalling ten caves, they were discovered by a French (French people) archaeological team in 2002, and are believed to date back around 5,000 years. The government and locals keep the cave paintings safe, and only a restricted number of tourists are allowed entry.

.82196a5b15ef45a2d4e744675740cd6a.6e1 Grotto galleries show early Somali life Control of the region is disputed between Awdalland, a proposed autonomous state, and Somaliland, a self-declared independent republic that is internationally recognized as an autonomous region (States and regions of Somalia) of Somalia. Local control of Sanaag is disputed between Somaliland, the autonomous Puntland region, and HBM-SSC (Hoggaanka Badbaadada iyo Mideynta SSC), a local unionist


combining traditional

Somalia_Constitution_English_FOR_WEB.pdf publisher Federal Government of Somalia accessdate 2 August 2012 It has a hybrid system of governance under the Constitution of Somaliland, combining traditional and western institutions. In a series of inter-clan conferences, culminating in the Boorama Conference in 1993, a ''qabil'' (clan or community) system of government was constructed. The constitution separates government into an executive branch, a legislative branch, and a judicial


sweet made

in the south of the region. A traditional soup called maraq (also part of Yemen cuisine) is made of vegetables, meat and beans and is usually eaten with flat bread or pitta bread. Beans are usually eaten for dessert, and oat or corn patties and salad can be eaten too. Somalis occasionally eat ''xalwo'', a jelly-like sweet made with water, sugar, and honey, though peanuts are sometimes added. Somalis who have spent some time in the Middle East eat baklava. Dates are also popular in Somaliland


wearing school

customs. However, most Somalis in this region prefer traditional Islamic dress code while a minority choose to both wear western-style clothing and cultural tradition. Men and women in Somaliland dress different, therefore they are catogorised into two sections: right 250px thumb Somali people Somali (File:Hargeisa schoolboys.jpg) boys in Hargeisa wearing school uniform. right 250px thumb Somali people Somali (File:Hargeisa schoolboys.jpg) boys in Hargeisa wearing school uniform


part series

-SSC_Factor.html Somaliland’s Quest for International Recognition and the HBM-SSC Factor *#Abdullahi Sheikh Ismail (2004–2006) ** '''Somaliland''' - Edna Adan Ismail (2003–2006) * '''South Africa''' - Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma (1999–2009) Places That Don't Exist (2005) Places That Don't Exist was Reeve's 2005 award-winning five-part series on breakaway states and unrecognised nations, broadcast on BBC2 and broadcasters internationally. Among the countries


analysis time

news2 2010 july analysis_time_for_jaw_jaw_not_war_war_in_somaliland.aspx Analysis: Time for jaw-jaw, not war-war in Somaliland In 1988, the Siad Barre regime launched a clampdown against the Hargeisa-based Somali National Movement (SNM) and other rebel outfits, which were among the events that led to the Somali Civil War. The conflict left the economic and military infrastructure severely damaged. After the collapse of the central


title analysis

WikiPedia:Somaliland Dmoz:Regional Africa Somalia Somaliland Commons:Somaliland

Somaliland

'''Somaliland''' ( before uniting with the Trust Territory of Somalia (the former Italian Somaliland) on 1 July 1960 to form the Somali Republic.

Somaliland is bordered by Ethiopia in the south and west, Djibouti in the northwest, the Gulf of Aden in the north, and the autonomous Puntland region of Somalia to the east. Analysis: Time for jaw-jaw, not war-war in Somaliland

In 1988, the Siad Barre regime launched a clampdown against the Hargeisa-based Somali National Movement (SNM) and other rebel outfits, which were among the events that led to the Somali Civil War. The conflict left the economic and military infrastructure severely damaged. After the collapse of the central government in 1991, the local government, led by the SNM, declared independence (Declaration of independence) from the rest of Somalia on 18 May of the same year.

Since then, the territory has been governed by an administration that seeks self-determination as the '''Republic of Somaliland''' ( It is a member of the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, whose members consist of indigenous peoples, minorities, and unrecognised or occupied territories.

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