Sokoto

What is Sokoto known for?


roles played

in the opposition’s diplomatic engagements in exile. An account of the process and roles played in the setting up of Radio Kudirat may be found in Fayemi's book Out Of The Shadows. '''Sir Ahmadu Bello''' (June 12, 1910 – January 15, 1966) was a Nigerian politician, and was the first premier of the Northern Nigeria region from 1954-1966. He was the Sardauna of Sokoto and one of the prominent leaders in Northern Nigeria alongside Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, both


related+business

their locality into Sokoto city for survival. From the above observation on how caliph Muhammad Bello designed the city of Sokoto we will see that Sokoto witnessed more immigrants with interest in blacksmithing leather works, pottery etc. For example, some of these people either engage in the business of blacksmithing or in other related business as in Makera Assada. There are people who used to travel to different parts of present Nigeria and even in neighbouring countries to buy damaged iron


historical development

dissects the plain and provides the rich alluvial soil fit for a variety of crop cultivation in the state. There are also isolated hills and mountain ranges scattered all over the state. Historical development of Sokoto thumbnail right The Sokoto area, crudely shown on an 1897 map (File:West Africa in 1897.jpg) thumb right Sokoto Caliphate in the 19th century (Image:Sokoto caliphate.png) Sokoto had been used as early as October 1804 by the Usman


black history

: www.britannica.com blackhistory article-24157 title Welcome to Encyclopædia Britannica's Guide to Black History publisher Britannica.com date accessdate 2010-08-29 ** in Borno (Sayfawa dynasty) (alongside the native title Mai) ** since 1817

from one- to two-thirds of the entire population of the Fulani jihad states consisted of enslaved people. The population of the Sokoto caliphate formed by Hausas (Hausa people) in the northern Nigeria and Cameroon was half-enslaved in the 19th century. Biography


stories+making

, I.A.B; ''Life and Works of Uthman Danfodiyo'', Ibadan 1981. * Bovil, E.W; ''The Golden Trade of the Moors'', London,1963. * Boyi, U.M; ''Tanziynul Waraqat'', Hausa Translation of Abdullahi ibn Fodiyo work. * Crowder, M; ''The Story of Nigeria'', London, 1962. * Jibril, Y.H; ''Philosophy among the Sokoto Scholars'', Benchmark Publishers, Kano Nigeria,2004. * Johston, H.A.S; ''The Fulani Empire of Sokoto'', London, 1968. * Mary Wren Bivins, ''Telling Stories, Making Histories: Women, Words


Niani

of "''tenbuch''" (Timbuktu), "''geugeu''" (Gao) and "''mayna''" (Niamey? or a misplaced Niani (Niani, Mali Empire)?) are denoted along the same single river. South of them (barely visible) are what seem like the towns of Kukiya (on the eastern shore of the Island of Gold), and east of that, probably Sokoto (called "Zogde" in the Catalan Atlas) and much further southeast, probably Kano. The inscription above Kano reads


people based

Sokoto state has a projected population of 3.7 million people based on a 2006 census made up of two ethnic groups namely, Hausa (Hausa people) and Fulani. Sokoto town, the capital of Sokoto state, has a population of approximately 2.5 million. Apart from Hausa and Fulani, there are the Zabarmawa and Tuareg minorities in the local government border areas. All these groups speak Hausa language Hausa


international amp

in London, UK, reporter with the newspapers, The Guardian and City Tempo, editor of the political monthly, Nigeria-Now, management consultant at Development and Management Consultants and lecturer at the Police College in Sokoto, Nigeria. As a prominent leader of the Nigerian opposition to military rule in exile, he was responsible for the founding and management of the opposition radios – Radio Freedom, Radio Democracy International & Radio Kudirat and played a central role


part based

'''Sir Ahmadu Bello''' (June 12, 1910 – January 15, 1966) was a Nigerian politician, and was the first premier of the Northern Nigeria region from 1954-1966. He was the Sardauna of Sokoto and one of the prominent leaders in Northern Nigeria alongside Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, both of whom were prominent in negotiations about the region's place in an independent Nigeria. As leader of the Northern People's Congress, he dominated Nigerian politics throughout the early Nigerian Federation and the First Nigerian Republic. His assassination in a coup on January 15, 1966 ultimately precipitated into the Nigerian civil war. Early life He was born in Rabbah, Sokoto State. The son of a district head and heir to the Sokoto Caliphate, his great-grandfather was Sultan Bello, the founder of Sokoto and son of the revered Shaykh Usman Dan Fodio. Ahmadu Bello received his education first at the Sokoto Provincial School, the only modern school at the time in the Sokoto province. Then, he proceeded to the Katsina Teacher's Training College. After spending five years at Katsina, he was appointed by the Sultan to become a teacher at the Sokoto Middle School, his former school which had undergone rapid transformation. In 1934, he was made the district head of Rabbah, four years later, he was promoted and sent to Gusau to become a divisional head. In 1938, he made an unsuccessful bid to become the new Sultan of Sokoto. The successful sultan immediately conferred upon Sir Ahmadu Bello the traditional, now honorary, title of '''Sarduna''', alternatively spelled '''Sardauna''', and elevated him to the Sokoto Native Authority Council. In 1948, he was offered a scholarship to study local government administration in England. Ahmadu Bello took the scholarship sensing he needed to shore up his knowledge about the process of governance. Early life He was born in Rabbah, Sokoto State. The son of a district head and heir to the Sokoto Caliphate, his great-grandfather was Sultan Bello, the founder of Sokoto and son of the revered Shaykh Usman Dan Fodio. Ahmadu Bello received his education first at the Sokoto Provincial School, the only modern school at the time in the Sokoto province. Then, he proceeded to the Katsina Teacher's Training College. After spending five years at Katsina, he was appointed by the Sultan to become a teacher at the Sokoto Middle School, his former school which had undergone rapid transformation. In 1934, he was made the district head of Rabbah, four years later, he was promoted and sent to Gusau to become a divisional head. In 1938, he made an unsuccessful bid to become the new Sultan of Sokoto. The successful sultan immediately conferred upon Sir Ahmadu Bello the traditional, now honorary, title of '''Sarduna''', alternatively spelled '''Sardauna''', and elevated him to the Sokoto Native Authority Council. In 1948, he was offered a scholarship to study local government administration in England. Ahmadu Bello took the scholarship sensing he needed to shore up his knowledge about the process of governance. Successor to be decided Within the next couple of days, the kingmakers will assemble and draw up a list of three possible candidates to be the next Sultan Sultan. This list is then presented to Sokoto (w:Sokoto) State Governor Attahiru Bafarawa (w:Attahiru Bafarawa), who will choose the next Sultan from the list of three. He is expected to choose the person who is placed at the top of the list. The list from the Kingmakers could come as early as Tuesday, and a decision by the State Governor by the end of the week.


low+variety

of the region allows for few crops, millet perhaps being the most abundant, complemented by maize, rice, other cereals, and beans. Apart from tomatoes, few vegetables grow in the region. The low variety of foodstuffs available has resulted in the relatively dull local cuisine

Sokoto

thumb right Sokoto river basin, showing location of the city (File:Sokotorivermap.png) '''Sokoto''' is a city located in the extreme northwest of Nigeria, near the confluence of the Sokoto River and the Rima River. As of 2006 it has a population of 427,760. Sokoto is the modern-day capital of Sokoto State (and its predecessor, the Northwestern State).

The name Sokoto (which is the modern anglicised version of the local name, ''Sakkwato'') is of Arabic origin, representing ''suk'', 'market'. It is also known as ''Sakkwato, Birnin Shaihu (Usman dan Fodio) da Bello (Muhammed Bello)'' or "Sokoto, Capital of Shaihu (Usman dan Fodio) and Bello (Muhammed Bello)".

Being the seat of the Sokoto Caliphate, the city is predominantly Muslim and an important seat of Islamic learning in Nigeria. The Sultan who heads the caliphate is effectively the spiritual leader of Nigerian Muslims.

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