Socialist Republic of Slovenia

What is Socialist Republic of Slovenia known for?


public appearances

by the Liberation Front (Liberation Front of the Slovenian People), banning all Slovene artists from further public appearances under occupation. It was first commemorated as a holiday in the partisan (Yugoslav partisans)-liberated territory in 1944 and officially proclaimed a cultural holiday in 1945.


playing basketball

Ljubljana, SR Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia), SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) nationality Slovenian Greek (Greece) Early life and career in Europe Nesterović was born in Ljubljana, SR Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia), SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia). He started playing basketball with the KD Slovan youth team. Later, he played with the junior club of KK Partizan and made his debut during the 1992–93 season. DATE OF BIRTH 1976-05-30 PLACE OF BIRTH Ljubljana, SR Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia), SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) DATE OF DEATH birth_date Gorizia and Gradisca thus ceased to exist as a unified historical region. Its Yugoslav portion became an integral part of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia: most of its territory was included in the Goriška region, except for the Kras plateau which was incorporated into the Littoral-Kras statistical region. A new urban center, called Nova Gorica ("New Gorizia") was built between the late 1940s and in the early 1950s. The Italian portion became part of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia autonomous region, mostly included in the Province of Gorizia. Parallel to the same process, Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) witnessed a policy of gradual liberalization since 1984, not unlike the Soviet Perestroika. This provoked tensions between the League of Communists of Slovenia on one side, and the central Yugoslav Party and the Federal Army (Yugoslav People's Army) on the other side. In mid May 1988, the Peasant Union of Slovenia was organized as the first non-Communist political organization in the country. Later in the same month, the Yugoslav Army arrested four Slovenian journalists of the alternative magazine ''Mladina'', accusing them of revealing state secrets. The so-called Ljubljana trial triggered mass protests in Ljubljana and other Slovenian cities. The Committee for the Defence of Human Rights was established as the platform of all major non-Communist political movements. By early 1989, several anti-Communist political parties were already openly functioning, challenging the hegemony of the Slovenian Communists. Soon, the Slovenian Communists, pressured by their own civil society, entered in conflict with the Serbian Communist leadership. *Albanians are committing genocide against Serbs in Kosovo (Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo) (pgs. 41, 56 of memorandum) *Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) and Croatia (Socialist Republic of Croatia) are taking control of the Serbian economy. Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) is taking industry out of Serbia (Socialist Republic of Serbia) (pg. 42) *There is need for constitutional changes of Yugoslavia (Constitution of Yugoslavia) because of its unfair mistreating and weakening of Serbia (pg. 46) Life He was born in Maribor, an industrial center in what was then the Yugoslav (Yugoslavia) Socialist Republic of Slovenia. His father, originally from the Prekmurje region, was a former partisan (Partisans (Yugoslavia)). Jančar studied law in his home town. While a student, he became chief editor of the student journal ''Katedra''; he soon came in conflict with the Communist (Communist Party of Slovenia) establishment because he published some articles critical of the ruling regime. He had to leave the journal. He soon found a job as an assistant at the Maribor daily newspaper ''Večer (Večer (Maribor))''. In 1974 he was arrested by Yugoslav (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) authorities for bringing to Yugoslavia a booklet entitled ''V Rogu ležimo pobiti'' (''We Lie Killed in the Rog Forest''), which he had bought in nearby Austria and lent to some friends. The booklet was a survivor's account of the Kočevski Rog massacres of the Slovene Home Guard war prisoners perpetrated by Josip Broz Tito's regime in May 1945. He was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for "spreading hostile propaganda" but was released after three months. Immediately after his release he was called up for military service in southern Serbia, where he was subjected to systematic harassment by his superiors due to his "criminal file".


kosovo

of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Macedonia (Socialist Republic of Macedonia) thus had to maintain an uneasy alliance to prevent Milošević from driving through constitutional changes. Serbia's political changes were ratified in a July 5, 1990 referendum across the entire republic of Serbia, including Kosovo. As a result of these measures more than 80,000 Kosovo Albanians were expelled from their state jobs in Kosovo. A new Serb curriculum was imposed in all higher education in Kosovo

, SR Montenegro (Socialist Republic of Montenegro), SR Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) and SR Serbia (Socialist Republic of Serbia) (including the autonomous (Autonomy) provinces of Vojvodina (Socialist Autonomous Province of Vojvodina) and Kosovo (Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo) which after 1974 were largely equal to the other members of the federation

of civilizations and the remaking of world order publisher Simon & Schuster ISBN 0-684-84441-9 year 1996 page 260 ). The similarity of the languages and the long history of common life have left many ties among the peoples of the new states, even though the individual state policies


hosting national

to the Socialist Republic of Slovenia and it was later inherited by the Government of the independent Slovenian state. In its traditional role of hosting national and international conferences, in 1990, it was the venue of a conference between the leaders of the six Yugoslavian republics (Socialist_Federal_Republic_of_Yugoslavia#Administrative_divisions) in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent the dissolution of the federation. birth_date birth_place


quot traditional

establishment and its allies in the Free Territory of Trieste. This resulted in a break with the local leftist circles, with whom Pahor had been engaged since 1946. He grew closer to Liberal Democratic (Liberal Democracy) positions and in 1966 he founded, together with fellow writer from Trieste Alojz Rebula, the magazine ''Zaliv'' ("The Bay"), in which he wanted to defend the "traditional democratic pluralism (cultural pluralism)" against


documentary published

Journal of Criminal Justice and Security accessdate 4 July 2012 The word 'Socialist


title legal

% of the overall electorate) voted in favour of secession of Slovenia from Yugoslavia. Gorizia and Gradisca thus ceased to exist as a unified historical region. Its Yugoslav portion became an integral part of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia: most of its territory was included in the Goriška region, except for the Kras plateau which was incorporated into the Littoral-Kras statistical region. A new urban center, called Nova Gorica ("New Gorizia") was built between the late 1940s and in the early 1950s. The Italian portion became part of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia autonomous region, mostly included in the Province of Gorizia. Parallel to the same process, Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) witnessed a policy of gradual liberalization since 1984, not unlike the Soviet Perestroika. This provoked tensions between the League of Communists of Slovenia on one side, and the central Yugoslav Party and the Federal Army (Yugoslav People's Army) on the other side. In mid May 1988, the Peasant Union of Slovenia was organized as the first non-Communist political organization in the country. Later in the same month, the Yugoslav Army arrested four Slovenian journalists of the alternative magazine ''Mladina'', accusing them of revealing state secrets. The so-called Ljubljana trial triggered mass protests in Ljubljana and other Slovenian cities. The Committee for the Defence of Human Rights was established as the platform of all major non-Communist political movements. By early 1989, several anti-Communist political parties were already openly functioning, challenging the hegemony of the Slovenian Communists. Soon, the Slovenian Communists, pressured by their own civil society, entered in conflict with the Serbian Communist leadership. *Albanians are committing genocide against Serbs in Kosovo (Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo) (pgs. 41, 56 of memorandum) *Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) and Croatia (Socialist Republic of Croatia) are taking control of the Serbian economy. Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) is taking industry out of Serbia (Socialist Republic of Serbia) (pg. 42) *There is need for constitutional changes of Yugoslavia (Constitution of Yugoslavia) because of its unfair mistreating and weakening of Serbia (pg. 46) Life He was born in Maribor, an industrial center in what was then the Yugoslav (Yugoslavia) Socialist Republic of Slovenia. His father, originally from the Prekmurje region, was a former partisan (Partisans (Yugoslavia)). Jančar studied law in his home town. While a student, he became chief editor of the student journal ''Katedra''; he soon came in conflict with the Communist (Communist Party of Slovenia) establishment because he published some articles critical of the ruling regime. He had to leave the journal. He soon found a job as an assistant at the Maribor daily newspaper ''Večer (Večer (Maribor))''. In 1974 he was arrested by Yugoslav (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) authorities for bringing to Yugoslavia a booklet entitled ''V Rogu ležimo pobiti'' (''We Lie Killed in the Rog Forest''), which he had bought in nearby Austria and lent to some friends. The booklet was a survivor's account of the Kočevski Rog massacres of the Slovene Home Guard war prisoners perpetrated by Josip Broz Tito's regime in May 1945. He was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for "spreading hostile propaganda" but was released after three months. Immediately after his release he was called up for military service in southern Serbia, where he was subjected to systematic harassment by his superiors due to his "criminal file".


news international

in the Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo, Socialist Republic of Serbia, led to the repression of the Albanian majority in Serbia's southern province. The more prosperous republics of Socialist


296

. The settlement was first mentioned in writing as ''Insula'' in a Venetian document entitled Liber albus in 932AD.296 Izola-Isola municipal website It became definitely the territory of the Republic of Venice in 1267, and the centuries of Venetian rule left a strong and enduring mark on the region. The Venetian part of the peninsula passed to the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation in 1797

; after the ''de facto'' dissolution of the Free Territory in 1954 it was incorporated into Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia), then a part of Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia).296 Izola Municipality site The newly defined Italo-Yugoslav border (Free Territory of Trieste) saw the migration of many people from one side to the other. In Izola's


single largest

). Former prominent Communist politician Ciril Ribičič was elected as the party's new president. The party lost against the Democratic Opposition of Slovenia (DEMOS) coalition at the first democratic elections in Slovenia in April 1990, gaining 17.3% of the popular vote. They nevertheless became the single largest party in Slovenia. birth_date Gorizia and Gradisca thus ceased to exist as a unified historical region. Its Yugoslav portion became an integral part of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia: most of its territory was included in the Goriška region, except for the Kras plateau which was incorporated into the Littoral-Kras statistical region. A new urban center, called Nova Gorica ("New Gorizia") was built between the late 1940s and in the early 1950s. The Italian portion became part of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia autonomous region, mostly included in the Province of Gorizia. Parallel to the same process, Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) witnessed a policy of gradual liberalization since 1984, not unlike the Soviet Perestroika. This provoked tensions between the League of Communists of Slovenia on one side, and the central Yugoslav Party and the Federal Army (Yugoslav People's Army) on the other side. In mid May 1988, the Peasant Union of Slovenia was organized as the first non-Communist political organization in the country. Later in the same month, the Yugoslav Army arrested four Slovenian journalists of the alternative magazine ''Mladina'', accusing them of revealing state secrets. The so-called Ljubljana trial triggered mass protests in Ljubljana and other Slovenian cities. The Committee for the Defence of Human Rights was established as the platform of all major non-Communist political movements. By early 1989, several anti-Communist political parties were already openly functioning, challenging the hegemony of the Slovenian Communists. Soon, the Slovenian Communists, pressured by their own civil society, entered in conflict with the Serbian Communist leadership. *Albanians are committing genocide against Serbs in Kosovo (Socialist Autonomous Province of Kosovo) (pgs. 41, 56 of memorandum) *Slovenia (Socialist Republic of Slovenia) and Croatia (Socialist Republic of Croatia) are taking control of the Serbian economy. Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) is taking industry out of Serbia (Socialist Republic of Serbia) (pg. 42) *There is need for constitutional changes of Yugoslavia (Constitution of Yugoslavia) because of its unfair mistreating and weakening of Serbia (pg. 46) Life He was born in Maribor, an industrial center in what was then the Yugoslav (Yugoslavia) Socialist Republic of Slovenia. His father, originally from the Prekmurje region, was a former partisan (Partisans (Yugoslavia)). Jančar studied law in his home town. While a student, he became chief editor of the student journal ''Katedra''; he soon came in conflict with the Communist (Communist Party of Slovenia) establishment because he published some articles critical of the ruling regime. He had to leave the journal. He soon found a job as an assistant at the Maribor daily newspaper ''Večer (Večer (Maribor))''. In 1974 he was arrested by Yugoslav (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) authorities for bringing to Yugoslavia a booklet entitled ''V Rogu ležimo pobiti'' (''We Lie Killed in the Rog Forest''), which he had bought in nearby Austria and lent to some friends. The booklet was a survivor's account of the Kočevski Rog massacres of the Slovene Home Guard war prisoners perpetrated by Josip Broz Tito's regime in May 1945. He was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for "spreading hostile propaganda" but was released after three months. Immediately after his release he was called up for military service in southern Serbia, where he was subjected to systematic harassment by his superiors due to his "criminal file".

Socialist Republic of Slovenia

The '''Socialist Republic of Slovenia''' ( On 8 March 1990, the Socialist Republic of Slovenia removed the prefix "Socialist" from its name, becoming the Republic of Slovenia, though remaining a constituent state of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 25 June 1991, when it enacted the laws resulting in independence.

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