Siwa Oasis

What is Siwa Oasis known for?


special interest

;, an antique natural spring. The fragmentary remains of the oracle temple, with some inscriptions dating from the 4th century BC, lie within the ruins of Aghurmi. The revelations of the oracle fell into disrepute under the Roman occupation of Egypt. Siwan homosexual tradition Siwa is of special interest to anthropologists and sociologists because of its historical acceptance of male homosexuality and even rituals of same-sex marriage—traditions that Egyptian


studies documentary

, and the Ligabue Research Institute—that searched for the Lost Army of Cambyses. The six-month search was conducted along the Egyptian-Libyan border in a remote 100-square-kilometer area of complex dunes south west of the uninhabited Bahrein Oasis, approximately 100 miles south east of Siwa (Amon) Oasis (Siwa Oasis). The $250,000 expedition had at its disposal 20 Egyptian geologists and laborers, a National Geographic photographer, two Harvard Film Studies documentary filmmakers, three camels


friendship quot

File:Adrar buildings.jpg Adrar (Adrar, Algeria) buildings, Algeria File:Siwa-Homes2009.jpg Siwa Oasis


local historic

) is a remote desert oasis village in the eastern Libyan Desert. It is actually closer to the Egyptian town of Siwa (Siwa Oasis) than to any Libyan town of note. The oasis is located in Butnan District and is the administrative seat of the Jaghbub Basic People's Congress (Basic People's Congress (country subdivision)). Supported by reservoirs of underground water and date production, the town is best known for its hard-won self sufficiency. King Idris of Libya was born in Jaghbub on 12 March 1889. Geography The Jaghbub oasis is located in a deep depression (Depression (geology)) that extends below sea level. This depression, an area lower than the surrounding region, reaches to about -10 m Elevation data by NASA's SRTM To the east the Siwa Oasis lies in a similar depression and even further east the large Qattara Depression also lies below sea level.


special interest'

;, an antique natural spring. The fragmentary remains of the oracle temple, with some inscriptions dating from the 4th century BC, lie within the ruins of Aghurmi. The revelations of the oracle fell into disrepute under the Roman occupation of Egypt. Siwan homosexual tradition Siwa is of special interest to anthropologists and sociologists because of its historical acceptance of male homosexuality and even rituals of same-sex marriage—traditions that Egyptian


previous episode

الإسرائيليين وهذه المناطق في الواحة المصرية" (ie: "the third reason is that some people of Siwa protested about a previous episode because one of the guests spoke of a strong relationship between Israelis and these parts of the Egyptian oases" The File: The Egyptian Oasis of Siwa: Hidden Heritage, Al Jazeera, 5 November 2010 the program's host produced an episode about the history and Berber heritage


strong relationship

الإسرائيليين وهذه المناطق في الواحة المصرية" (ie: "the third reason is that some people of Siwa protested about a previous episode because one of the guests spoke of a strong relationship between Israelis and these parts of the Egyptian oases" The File: The Egyptian Oasis of Siwa: Hidden Heritage, Al Jazeera, 5 November 2010 the program's host produced an episode about the history and Berber heritage


local power

of the Garamantes, based in Germa, originated from this time, or may have done so even earlier when the Sahara was still green. The Garamantes were a Saharan people of Berber origin who used an elaborate underground irrigation system, and founded a kingdom in the Fezzan area of modern-day Libya. They were probably present as tribal people in the Fezzan by 1000 BC, and were a local power in the Sahara between 500 BC and 500 AD. By the time of contact with the Phoenicians, the first of the Semitic civilizations to arrive in Libya from the East, the Lebu, Garamantes, Bebers and other tribes that lived in the Sahara were already well established. ) is a remote desert oasis village in the eastern Libyan Desert. It is actually closer to the Egyptian town of Siwa (Siwa Oasis) than to any Libyan town of note. The oasis is located in Butnan District and is the administrative seat of the Jaghbub Basic People's Congress (Basic People's Congress (country subdivision)). Supported by reservoirs of underground water and date production, the town is best known for its hard-won self sufficiency. King Idris of Libya was born in Jaghbub on 12 March 1889. Geography The Jaghbub oasis is located in a deep depression (Depression (geology)) that extends below sea level. This depression, an area lower than the surrounding region, reaches to about -10 m Elevation data by NASA's SRTM To the east the Siwa Oasis lies in a similar depression and even further east the large Qattara Depression also lies below sea level.


contribution

name EBsiwa

editor-first Kathryn A. editor2-last Shubert editor2-first Steven Blake contribution contribution-url title Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt year 1999 pages place publisher Routledge (UK) url http: books.google.com ?id XNdgScxtirYC&pg PA738&lpg PA738&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22 doi id ISBN 0-415-18589-0 isbn 978-0-415-18589-9

author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last Arnold editor-first Dieter editor2-last Strudwick editor2-first Helen editor3-last Strudwick editor3-first Nigel contribution contribution-url title The Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture year 2003 pages place publisher I B Tauris url http: books.google.com ?id XIns9M_9DcgC&pg RA1-PA223&lpg RA1-PA223&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22


quot friendship

File:Adrar buildings.jpg Adrar (Adrar, Algeria) buildings, Algeria File:Siwa-Homes2009.jpg Siwa

Siwa Oasis

The '''Siwa Oasis''' (Siwi (Siwi language): Isiwan; ) is an oasis in Egypt, between the Qattara Depression and the Egyptian Sand Sea in the Libyan Desert, nearly 50 km (30 mi) east of the Libyan border, and 560 km (348 mi) from Cairo. first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last editor-first editor2-last editor2-first contribution Siwa contribution-url title Encyclopædia Britannica year 2007 pages place publisher url doi id first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last Bard editor-first Kathryn A. editor2-last Shubert editor2-first Steven Blake contribution contribution-url title Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt year 1999 pages place publisher Routledge (UK) url http: books.google.com ?id XNdgScxtirYC&pg PA738&lpg PA738&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22 doi id ISBN 0-415-18589-0 isbn 978-0-415-18589-9 first last author-link first2 last2 author2-link editor-last Arnold editor-first Dieter editor2-last Strudwick editor2-first Helen editor3-last Strudwick editor3-first Nigel contribution contribution-url title The Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture year 2003 pages place publisher I B Tauris url http: books.google.com ?id XIns9M_9DcgC&pg RA1-PA223&lpg RA1-PA223&dq %22Siwa+Oasis%22 doi id ISBN 1-86064-465-1 isbn 978-1-86064-465-8

About 80 km (50 mi) in length and 20 km (12 mi) wide, Siwa Oasis is one of Egypt's most isolated settlements, with 23,000 people, mostly Berber speakers (Berber people) who speak a distinct language of the Berber family (Berber languages) known as Siwi (Siwi language). Its fame lies primarily in its ancient role as the home to an oracle of Amon (Amun), the ruins of which are a popular tourist attraction which gave the oasis its ancient name '''Ammonium'''. Historically, it is part of Ancient Libya. Its modern name ''Siwa'', first attested in the 15th century (earlier Arab geographers termed it ''Santariyyah''), is of uncertain origin. Basset last Basset first René author-link last2 first2 author2-link year 1890 date publication-date contribution contribution-url editor-last editor-first title Le dialecte de Syouah edition series volume place Paris publication-place publisher Ernest Leroux page 3 id isbn doi oclc url links it to a Berber tribal name ''swh'' attested further west in the early Islamic period, while Ilahiane, last Ilahiane first Hsain author-link last2 first2 author2-link year 2006 date publication-date 2006 contribution Siwa Oasis contribution-url editor-last editor-first title Historical dictionary of the Berbers (Imazighen) edition series Historical dictionaries of peoples and cultures volume 5 place Lanham, MD publication-place publisher Scarecrow Press, Inc page 111 id isbn 978-0-8108-5452-9 doi oclc url following Chafik, links it to the Tashelhiyt Berber word ''asiwan'', a type of bird of prey, and hence to Amon-Ra, one of whose symbols was the falcon.

Agriculture is the main activity of modern Siwi, particularly the cultivation of date (date palm)s and olives. Handicrafts like basketry are also of regional importance. The isolation of the oasis caused the development of a unique culture which was shown in its pottery, costume, styles of embroidery and, most notably, in the silver jewellery worn by women to weddings and important occasions. These pieces were decorated with symbols which related to Siwa’s history and beliefs and attitudes. Margaret Mary Vale, 2011, Sand and Silver: Jewellery, Costume and Life in Siwa Oasis, London:Kelim Tourism has in recent decades become a vital source of income. Much attention has been given to creating hotels that use local materials and play on local styles. Can a Desert Oasis Lead the Way to Sustainable Eco-Tourism in Egypt?

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