Sisak

What is Sisak known for?


768

in rulers until the coming of the first Serbian Prince known by name, Višeslav (Višeslav of Serbia), who was a contemporary with Charlemagne (768–814). Višeslav's son, or grandson, ruled during the uprisings of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks in 819–822. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia – the Serbs are mentioned as controlling the greater part of Dalmatia (Roman province

of Charlemagne (fl. 768-814), ruled the Županias of ''Neretva, Tara (Tara Mountain), Piva, Lim (Lim River)'', his ancestral lands. Count Cedomilj Mijatovic, ''Servia and the Servians'', p. 3; John Anthony Cuddon, ''The companion guide to Jugoslavia'', p. 454 According to the Royal Frankish Annals (821–822), ''Duke of Pannonia'' Ljudevit Posavski fled, during the Frankish invasion, from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs in western Bosnia, who controlled


strong resistance

5th Corps continued to advance into rebel Serb-controlled territory near Slunj (north of Plitvice) and reached the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. The towns of Petrinja, Kostajnica, Obrovac (Obrovac, Croatia), Korenica, Slunj, Bruvno, Vrhovine, Plaški, Cetingrad, Plitvice and Glina (Glina, Croatia) were all captured during the course of the day. Strong resistance was only encountered in the town of Glina (south of Sisak). The Croatian


958'

800–822 Son of Višeslav I. He or his son ruled during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)). At this time, there was peace with Bulgaria (First Bulgarian Empire). center>

and Herzegovina (until 958) western Bosnia who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Roman province). http: books.google.se books?id YIAYMNOOe0YC Some Croatian historians (f.e. Nada Klaić) claim that the place Ljudevit fled to was Srb on the mouth of Una (Una (Sava)) (in Lika, Croatia) but other historians dispute this as unfounded. Another array of historians reject the possibility that Ljudevit went to the Serbs at all - but to the actual city

supreme ruler. He was succeeded by his son Radoslav (Radoslav of Serbia), who was the ruler of Serbia during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem


attacks quot

name "NYT-JNA-offensive"

: query.nytimes.com gst fullpage.html?res 9F0CE7DC1138F931A2575AC0A965958260&sec &spon &scp 2&sq shelling%20croatia%201992&st cse newspaper New York Times date September 11, 1993 accessdate October 7, 2010

Sudetic authorlink Chuck Sudetic date November 5, 1991 accessdate December 16, 2010 ref name "NYTimes


great part

800–822 Son of Višeslav I. He or his son ruled during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)). At this time, there was peace with Bulgaria (First Bulgarian Empire). center>

, p. 53 According to the Royal Frankish Annals (821-822), the rebellious ''Duke of Pannonia'' Ljudevit Posavski fled, during the Frankish invasion, from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs in western Bosnia, who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur''"). ''Eginhartus de vita et gestis Caroli Magni'',

of Serbia his son was the ruler of Serbia during the uprisings (819-822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''ad Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur''"). ''Nachrichten von der Georg-Augusts Universität und der Königliches Gesellschaft der Wisenschaften zu


1991

stari most.JPG thumb right Sisak Old Bridge (Sisak Stari Most) in Zitna Street Sisak suffered much damage during the Croatian War of Independence starting in 1991. While Sisak remained within Croatian hands, the territory immediately south of the city was controlled by Serbs (Republic of Serbian Krajina), who often shelled the city indiscriminately, causing many civilian casualties. The threat to Sisak was removed in 1995 following Operation Storm. Between 1991 and 1992, 24 Serb

18669 1880 20433 1890 22829 1900 24277 1910 26014 1921 26234 1931 28799 1948 28893 1953 34776 1961 43382 1971 55095 1981 59812 1991 61413 2001 52236 2011 47768 The city administrative area is composed of the following settlements (naselje): * Blinjski Kut, population 278 * Budaševo, population 1,660 * Bukovsko, population 89 * Crnac (Crnac, Sisak-Moslavina County), population 553 * Čigoč

border crossing Dvor na Uni, along with local Dušan Carić, and Belgraders Dušan Bandić and Zoran Stevanović. His entourage was sent to Sisak, and was charged with conspiracy to overthrow the newly formed Croatian state. Arkan was given 20 months in jail. He was released from the Remetinec prison in Zagreb on 14 June 1991 under unclear circumstances, without the notice of Josip Boljkovac, then Internal Minister. It is believed that the Croatian and Serbian governments agreed on a 1


title personal

with the Institute for modern history in Ljubljana. He is now a professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Ljubljana. One month after Croatia declared its independence (Independence of Croatia), the Yugoslav army and other Serb forces held something less than one-third


great part'

800–822 Son of Višeslav I. He or his son ruled during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)). At this time, there was peace with Bulgaria (First Bulgarian Empire). center>

, p. 53 According to the Royal Frankish Annals (821-822), the rebellious ''Duke of Pannonia'' Ljudevit Posavski fled, during the Frankish invasion, from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs in western Bosnia, who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur''"). ''Eginhartus de vita et gestis Caroli Magni'',

of Serbia his son was the ruler of Serbia during the uprisings (819-822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''ad Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur''"). ''Nachrichten von der Georg-Augusts Universität und der Königliches Gesellschaft der Wisenschaften zu


harsh treatment

). In 649 or 667, Emperor Constans II relocated Serbs from "around river Vardar" to Asia Minor (see Asia Minor Slavs). Some 30,000 soldiers in the city of Gordoservon (''City of the Serbs''), were to fight the Umayyad Caliphate, however they deserted the battlefield in 692 due to harsh treatment. Erdeljanovich.J. "O naseljavanju Slovena u Maloj Aziji i Siriji od VII do X veka" Glasnik geografskog drushtva vol. VI 1921 pp.189 There is a gap


classical world

, and they erected fortresses in Singidunum Celts and the Classical World by David Rankin, ISBN 0-415-15090-6, 1996, page 188: "...of the survivors of Brenus expedition the Scordisci founded Singidunum in Yugoslavia..." and Taurunum (today's city of Belgrade). The Roman's first siege of Segestica (Sisak), having been under the control of their Pannonian clients, curtailed Celtic control in Dalmatia and south-western Pannonia. This combined with the turmoil

Sisak

thumb 250px Vetriano (File:Maiorina-Vetranio-siscia RIC 281.jpg) coin struck at Siscia mint in 350.

'''Sisak''' ( southeast of the Croatian capital Zagreb. The city's total population in 2011 was 47,768 of which 33,322 live in the urban settlement (naselje). http: www.dzs.hr Hrv censuses census2011 results htm H01_01_01 h01_01_01_zup03_3913.html

Sisak is the administrative centre of the Sisak-Moslavina County, Croatia's biggest river port and a centre of river shipping industry (Dunavski Lloyd). It lies on the main road Zagreb-Hrvatski Sisak-Petrinja (M12.2) and the railroad Zagreb-Sisak-Sunja (Sunja, Sisak-Moslavina County). Sisak is a regional economic, cultural and historical center. The largest oil refinery in Croatia is located here. http: www.mol.hu en business_centre refining_marketing refining

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