Sicherheitspolizei

What is Sicherheitspolizei known for?


biography

978-0-7110-2905-7 ref harv *

'' in the Waffen-SS Reserve. A Complete Biography of Ernst Kaltenbrunner – Promotions Later in April 1941, he was promoted to Major General (''Generalleutnant'') of the Police. On 30 January 1943 Kaltenbrunner was appointed Chief of the RSHA, composed of the SiPo (Sicherheitspolizei: the combined forces of the Gestapo and Kripo) along with the SD (Sicherheitsdienst: Security Service). ref>

was at that time also named chief of all German police forces outside Prussia. Himmler named Heydrich the head of the Gestapo on 22 April 1934. Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1''. 2001, p 61. Himmler was later named the chief of all German police on 17 June 1936. Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1''. 2001, p 77. At that point, the Gestapo became a national state agency rather than a Prussian state agency


leadership+school

office of Stuttgart (''Stapoleitstelle Stuttgart''). Over the next year, Kappler began to be noticed by his superiors and at this time was first introduced to Reinhard Heydrich (although some sources state Kappler knew Heydrich for some time before). In 1937, Kappler (now an SS-Oberscharführer (Staff Sergeant)) was sent by his Gestapo superiors to attend the ''Führerschule der Sicherheitspolzei'' (Leadership School of the Secret Police) in Berlin from which he graduated in the summer of 1937 as a certified ''Kriminalkommissar'' (Criminal Commissioner). This set the stage for further advancement and Kappler was commissioned a Gestapo officer, with the rank of SS-Untersturmführer (Second Lieutenant), on November 9, 1938 (the traditional anniversary of the Munich Beer Hall Putsch). * Nazi Party number: 594,899 * Primary positions: Gestapo, Sicherheitspolizei, RSHA * Waffen-SS service: None Victor Kugler and Johannes Kleiman were arrested and jailed at the penal camp for enemies of the regime at Amersfoort. Kleiman was released after seven weeks, but Kugler was held in various work camps (Durchgangslager) until the war's end. On April 7, 1945, the Soviet press published the "Declaration of the Special Government Commission charged with the inquiry into the crimes committed by the German-Fascist aggressors during their occupation of the Latvian Socialist Soviet Republic". This document devotes a chapter to the persecution and murder of Jews. The declaration lists Nazis held responsible for the crimes committed in Latvia under German occupation. They include Lohse, the Reich Commissioner for Ostland; Friedrich Jeckeln, chief of police (HSSPF) for Ostland; Drechsler, Commissioner General for Latvia; Rudolf Lange, chief of the security police (Sicherheitspolizei); Krause, chief of the Riga ghetto and commandant of the Salaspils concentration camp; Sauer, commandant of the Kaiserwald concentration camp; and several dozen other Nazi criminals involved in the destruction of Latvian Jewry. On January 26, 1946, the military tribunal of the Baltic Military District began a trial of a group of Nazi war criminals, among them Jeckeln, one of the men responsible for the Rumbula massacre at the end of 1941. He and six others were sentenced to death by hanging; the sentence was carried out in Riga on February 3, 1946. Other trials were held in the postwar Latvian SSR, but altogether only a small number of Germans and Latvians who had taken part in the murder of Latvian Jewry were brought to justice.


main intelligence

by the combined forces of the Gestapo (secret state police) and the Kripo (criminal police) between 1936 and 1939. As a formal agency, the SiPo was folded into the RSHA in 1939, but the term continued to be used informally until the end of the Third Reich. * Sicherheitsdienst (SD) — "security service"; the SS and Nazi Party security service. Later, the main intelligence-gathering, and counter-espionage sections of the RSHA; originally headed by Reinhard Heydrich. * Sicherheitspolizei (SiPo) — "security police", the combined forces of the Gestapo and KriPo, made up of the Reich's criminal investigators and secret state police. * "sichern und laden" — "lock and load". History of Gęsiówka Before the war, Gęsiówka was a military prison of the Polish Army on Gęsia Street (now Anielewicza (Mordechaj Anielewicz) Street). Beginning in 1939, after the German (Nazi Germany) occupation (Military occupation) of Poland, it became a re-education camp of the German security police (Sicherheitspolizei) ('''''Arbeitserziehungslager der Sicherheitspolizei Warschau'''''). In 1943 it was turned into a concentration camp (Nazi concentration camp) for inmates from beyond Warsaw and Poland, equipped with a gas chambers and crematoriums. The camp was joined with a nearby Pawiak prison and formed the backbone of the Warsaw concentration camp complex. Inmates (mostly Jews) included prisoners from Czechoslovakia, France, Greece, Hungary, Belgium and Germany. On January 11, 1943, Höfle sent a radiogram (Radiogram (message)) from Lublin to ''SS-Obersturmbannführer'' Franz Heim in Kraków, who was at the time the deputy commander of the Security Police (Sicherheitspolizei) and SD (Sicherheitsdienst) in the General Government, and to ''SS-Obersturmbannführer'' Adolf Eichmann in Berlin. The message documented the total deportations of Jews to the four Operation Reinhard camps through 31 of December 1942. Today this document is called the Höfle Telegram. Organization of the ''Einsatzgruppen'' ''Einsatzgruppen'' (German: "task forces", "special-ops units") were paramilitary groups originally formed under the direction of Reinhard Heydrich, Chief of the SD (Sicherheitsdienst), and ''Sicherheitspolizei'' (Security Police, SiPo) in 1938. They were operated by the ''Schutzstaffel'' (SS). Per a Hitler-Himmler directive, the ''Einsatzgruppen'' were re-formed in anticipation of the assault on Russia (Operation Barbarossa). ''The Einsatzgruppen'' were once again under the control of Reinhard Heydrich as Chief of the ''Reichssicherheitshauptamt'' (RSHA—''Reich'' Main Security Office); after his death they were under the control of his successor, Ernst Kaltenbrunner. In autumn 1943 some detachments of the UPA attempted to find rapprochement with the Germans. Although doing so was condemned by an OUN UPA order from November 25, 1943, these actions did not end. p.190-194 In early 1944 UPA forces in several Western regions engaged in cooperation with the German Wehrmacht, Waffen SS, SiPo (Sicherheitspolizei) and SD (Sicherheitsdienst). p.192 p.192-194 Yaroslav Hrytsak, "History of Ukraine 1772-1999" However, in the winter and spring of 1944 it would be incorrect to state that there was a complete cessation of armed conflict between UPA and Nazi forces, because the UPA continued to defend Ukrainian villages against the repressive actions of the German administration. p.196 For example, on January 20, 200 German soldiers on their way to the Ukrainian village of Pyrohivka were forced to retreat after a several-hours long firefight with a group of 80 UPA soldiers after having lost 30 killed and wounded. Institute of Ukrainian History, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, ''Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army'', Chapter 14, pg. 197 In March–July 1944 a senior leader of OUN(B) in Galicia conducted negotiations with SD and SS officials, resulting in a German decision to supply the UPA with arms and ammunition. In May of that year, the OUN issued instructions to "switch the struggle, which had been conducted against the Germans, completely into a struggle against the Soviets.". Institute of Ukrainian History, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, ''Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army'', Chapter 14 parent_agency 23px (File:Flag Schutzstaffel.svg) ''Schutzstaffel'' child1_agency RSHA (Gestapo, Sicherheitspolizei, SD (Sicherheitsdienst) and Kriminalpolizei (Kriminalpolizei#Nazi_Germany)) child2_agency SS Economic and Administrative Departments (SS-Wirtschafts-Verwaltungshauptamt) On 20 April 1934, Göring (Hermann Göring) and Himmler agreed to put aside their differences (largely because of mutual hatred of the SA). Göring transferred control of the Gestapo to Himmler, who was also named chief of all German police forces outside Prussia. The SS was further cemented when both it and the Gestapo participated in the destruction of the SA during the Night of the Long Knives from 30 June to 2 July 1934. They either killed or arrested every major SA leader – above all Ernst Röhm. Himmler was later named the chief of all German police in June, 1936. Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', p 77. Therein, the Gestapo was incorporated into the SiPo (Sicherheitspolizei) with the Kripo (Kriminalpolizei#Nazi_Germany) (Criminal Police). Heydrich was made head of the SiPo and continued as chief of the SD (Sicherheitsdienst). Lumsden, Robin. ''A Collector's Guide To: The Allgemeine - SS'', p 83. Security forces From 1936, the state security police forces of the Gestapo and Kripo (Criminal Police) were consolidated and placed under the central command of Reinhard Heydrich, already chief of the party ''Sicherheitsdienst'' (SD), and named Sicherheitspolizei. Later from 27 September 1939 forward, they were all folded into the Reich Main Security Office (RSHA) (RSHA) which was placed under Heydrich's control. The ordinary uniformed German police, known as the Ordnungspolizei (Orpo) were also under SS control after 1936 but never incorporated into the Allgemeine-SS, although many police members were also dual SS members. The police were divided into the ''Ordnungspolizei'' (''Orpo'' or regular police) and the Sicherheitspolizei (''SiPo'' or security police), which had been established in June 1936. Williams, p 77. The Orpo assumed duties of regular uniformed law enforcement while the SiPo consisted of the secret state police (Geheime Staatspolizei or Gestapo) and criminal investigation police (Kriminalpolizei or Kripo). The Kriminalpolizei was a corps of professional detectives involved in fighting crime and the task of the Gestapo was combating espionage and political dissent. On 27 September 1939, the SS security service, the Sicherheitsdienst (SD) and the SiPo were folded into the Reich Main Security Office (Reichssicherheitshauptamt or RSHA). Lumsden, Robin. ''A Collector's Guide To: The Allgemeine - SS'', p 83. The RSHA symbolized the close connection between the SS (a party organization) and the police (a state organization). After Hitler took office in January 1933, he soon began a programme of ''Nazification (Gleichschaltung)'' of all aspects of German life, in order to consolidate the Nazi party's hold on power. In July 1936, the Kripo became the Criminal Police Department for the entire Reich. It was merged, along with the Gestapo into the ''Sicherheitspolizei'' (SiPo). Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', p 77. At that point, Reinhard Heydrich was in overall command of the SiPo (Gestapo and Kripo) and the ''Sicherheitsdienst'' (SD) (Sicherheitsdienst). Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', p 77. Nebe was appointed head of the ''Kriminalpolizei'' (Kripo). As head of the Kripo, Nebe reported to Heydrich. In May 1941, Stroop changed his name from Josef to Jürgen for ideological reasons and in honor of his deceased son. From 7 July to 15 September 1941, Stroop served in combat on the eastern front (Eastern Front (World War II)) with the infantry regiment of the 3rd SS Division ''Totenkopf'' (3rd SS Division Totenkopf). He was awarded a Clasp to the Iron Cross 2nd Class (Iron Cross#Design) and an Infantry Assault Badge in Bronze. On 16 September 1942, he was promoted to SS-''Brigadeführer'' and assigned as an Inspector of the SiPo (Sicherheitspolizei) and SD (Sicherheitsdienst) of the Higher SS and Police Leader for Russia South. In this position Stroop worked to help secure a key logistical (logistics) route for German forces on the Eastern Front. Beginning in October 1942, Stroop commanded an SS garrison at Kherson, before becoming the SS and Police Leader (SSPF) for Lemberg (Lviv) in February 1943. Eduard Strauch Commander of Einsatzkommando 2 (Einsatzgruppen), anschliessend commander of two Nazi organizations, the Security Police ( German: Sicherheitspolizei), or SiPo, and the Security Service ( German: Sicherheitsdienst, or SD, first in Belarus (then called White Russia or White Ruthenia) and later in Belgium. In October 1944, he was transferred to the military branch of the SS (Waffen-SS). 19.312 Werner Knab Gestapo chief in Norway Commander of the Security Police (Sicherheitspolizei) in Lyon, France 191584 Erich Priebke SD and Sicherheitspolizei commander in Rome, Italy '''Helmut Knochen''' (March 14, 1910 – April 4, 2003) was the senior commander of the Sicherheitspolizei (Security Police) and Sicherheitsdienst in Paris during the Nazi (Nazism) occupation of France during the World War II. '''Franz Walter Stahlecker''' (10 October 1900 – 23 March 1942) was Commander of the Sicherheitspolizei and the Sicherheitsdienst ( On April 7, 1945, the Soviet press published the "Declaration of the Special Government Commission charged with the inquiry into the crimes committed by the German-Fascist aggressors during their occupation of the Latvian Socialist Soviet Republic". This document devotes a chapter to the persecution and murder of Jews. The declaration lists Nazis held responsible for the crimes committed in Latvia under German occupation. They include Lohse, the Reich Commissioner for Ostland; Friedrich Jeckeln, chief of police (HSSPF) for Ostland; Drechsler, Commissioner General for Latvia; Rudolf Lange, chief of the security police (Sicherheitspolizei); Krause, chief of the Riga ghetto and commandant of the Salaspils concentration camp; Sauer, commandant of the Kaiserwald concentration camp; and several dozen other Nazi criminals involved in the destruction of Latvian Jewry. On January 26, 1946, the military tribunal of the Baltic Military District began a trial of a group of Nazi war criminals, among them Jeckeln, one of the men responsible for the Rumbula massacre at the end of 1941. He and six others were sentenced to death by hanging; the sentence was carried out in Riga on February 3, 1946. Other trials were held in the postwar Latvian SSR, but altogether only a small number of Germans and Latvians who had taken part in the murder of Latvian Jewry were brought to justice.


concentration

the Dachau Concentration Camp in 1936. On 17 June 1936 all police forces throughout Germany were united, with Himmler as the chief. On 26 June, Himmler reorganised the police into two groups: the Ordnungspolizei (Orpo), consisting of both the national uniformed police and the municipal police, and the Sicherheitspolizei (SiPo), consisting of the Gestapo and the Kripo or Kriminalpolizei (criminal police). At that point, Heydrich was head of the SiPo and SD

maintained a presence at all concentration camps and supplied personnel, on an as-needed basis, to such special action troops as the ''Einsatzgruppen''. The SD-SiPo was also the primary agency, in conjunction with the ''Ordnungspolizei'', assigned to maintain order and security in the Jewish Ghettos established by the Germans on the territory of occupied Eastern Europe. The implementation of the order was entrusted to Sonderkommando 4a, commanded by Blobel, under the general

Jews, who are not too old," for eventual transfer to concentration camps. Heydrich's secret instructions regarding the riots in November 1938 (Simon Wiesenthal Center) Before they were sent as guards to the concentration camps, most of the Soviet POWs underwent special training in Trawniki, which originally was a holding center for those refugees and Soviet POWs, whom


torture

. In particular the Sicherheitspolizei and Sicherheitsdienst headquarters in Victoria Terrasse were notorious for torture and abuse of prisoners. Also, Arkivet (Arkivet (Kristiansand)) in Kristiansand and Bandeklosteret in Trondheim became synonymous with torture and abuse. Infamously, it was taken over by the occupying Nazi (Occupation of Norway by Nazi Germany) Sicherheitspolizei and Sicherheitsdienst in April 1940, serving as headquarters during the World War II war

years . The offices held the interrogation centre for all prisoners in Oslo, and the place became synonymous with torture and abuse. On occasion prisoners jumped out of windows to their death while waiting to be interrogated. On October 20, 1941, Turner attended meeting with other Nazi officials including Security Police ''Sicherheitspolizei'' chief Wilhelm Fuchs, Franz Rademacher (in charge of Jewish affairs at the German Foreign Ministry


close connection

(Kriminalpolizei or Kripo). The Kriminalpolizei was a corps of professional detectives involved in fighting crime and the task of the Gestapo was combating espionage and political dissent. On 27 September 1939, the SS security service, the Sicherheitsdienst (SD) and the SiPo were folded into the Reich Main Security Office (Reichssicherheitshauptamt or RSHA). Lumsden, Robin. ''A Collector's Guide To: The Allgemeine - SS'', p 83. The RSHA symbolized the close connection between the SS (a party organization) and the police (a state organization). After Hitler took office in January 1933, he soon began a programme of ''Nazification (Gleichschaltung)'' of all aspects of German life, in order to consolidate the Nazi party's hold on power. In July 1936, the Kripo became the Criminal Police Department for the entire Reich. It was merged, along with the Gestapo into the ''Sicherheitspolizei'' (SiPo). Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', p 77. At that point, Reinhard Heydrich was in overall command of the SiPo (Gestapo and Kripo) and the ''Sicherheitsdienst'' (SD) (Sicherheitsdienst). Williams, Max. ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', p 77. Nebe was appointed head of the ''Kriminalpolizei'' (Kripo). As head of the Kripo, Nebe reported to Heydrich. In May 1941, Stroop changed his name from Josef to Jürgen for ideological reasons and in honor of his deceased son. From 7 July to 15 September 1941, Stroop served in combat on the eastern front (Eastern Front (World War II)) with the infantry regiment of the 3rd SS Division ''Totenkopf'' (3rd SS Division Totenkopf). He was awarded a Clasp to the Iron Cross 2nd Class (Iron Cross#Design) and an Infantry Assault Badge in Bronze. On 16 September 1942, he was promoted to SS-''Brigadeführer'' and assigned as an Inspector of the SiPo (Sicherheitspolizei) and SD (Sicherheitsdienst) of the Higher SS and Police Leader for Russia South. In this position Stroop worked to help secure a key logistical (logistics) route for German forces on the Eastern Front. Beginning in October 1942, Stroop commanded an SS garrison at Kherson, before becoming the SS and Police Leader (SSPF) for Lemberg (Lviv) in February 1943. Eduard Strauch Commander of Einsatzkommando 2 (Einsatzgruppen), anschliessend commander of two Nazi organizations, the Security Police ( German: Sicherheitspolizei), or SiPo, and the Security Service ( German: Sicherheitsdienst, or SD, first in Belarus (then called White Russia or White Ruthenia) and later in Belgium. In October 1944, he was transferred to the military branch of the SS (Waffen-SS). 19.312 Werner Knab Gestapo chief in Norway Commander of the Security Police (Sicherheitspolizei) in Lyon, France 191584 Erich Priebke SD and Sicherheitspolizei commander in Rome, Italy '''Helmut Knochen''' (March 14, 1910 – April 4, 2003) was the senior commander of the Sicherheitspolizei (Security Police) and Sicherheitsdienst in Paris during the Nazi (Nazism) occupation of France during the World War II. '''Franz Walter Stahlecker''' (10 October 1900 – 23 March 1942) was Commander of the Sicherheitspolizei and the Sicherheitsdienst ( On April 7, 1945, the Soviet press published the "Declaration of the Special Government Commission charged with the inquiry into the crimes committed by the German-Fascist aggressors during their occupation of the Latvian Socialist Soviet Republic". This document devotes a chapter to the persecution and murder of Jews. The declaration lists Nazis held responsible for the crimes committed in Latvia under German occupation. They include Lohse, the Reich Commissioner for Ostland; Friedrich Jeckeln, chief of police (HSSPF) for Ostland; Drechsler, Commissioner General for Latvia; Rudolf Lange, chief of the security police (Sicherheitspolizei); Krause, chief of the Riga ghetto and commandant of the Salaspils concentration camp; Sauer, commandant of the Kaiserwald concentration camp; and several dozen other Nazi criminals involved in the destruction of Latvian Jewry. On January 26, 1946, the military tribunal of the Baltic Military District began a trial of a group of Nazi war criminals, among them Jeckeln, one of the men responsible for the Rumbula massacre at the end of 1941. He and six others were sentenced to death by hanging; the sentence was carried out in Riga on February 3, 1946. Other trials were held in the postwar Latvian SSR, but altogether only a small number of Germans and Latvians who had taken part in the murder of Latvian Jewry were brought to justice.


research team

of the Gestapo in the Netherlands. * ''Area IV'' (Ochota): The units mobilized in this area did not capture either the territory or the military targets (the Gęsiówka concentration camp


800

300-4 200 Kriminalobersekretär SS-Untersturmführer (Leutnant) - A4c2 2 800-5000 Kriminalinspektor SS-Obersturmführer (Oberleutnant) - A4c1 2 800-5 300 Kriminalkommissar (Oberleutnant) - A4c1 2 800-5 300 Kriminalkommissar three years in grade SS-Hauptsturmführer (Hauptmann) - A3b 4 800-7 000

Kriminalrat (Hauptmann) - A3b 4 800-7 000 Kriminalrat three years in grade SS-Sturmbannführer (Major) - A2d 4 800-7 800 Kriminaldirektor SS-Sturmbannführer (Major) - A2c2 4 800-8 400 Regierungs-und Kriminalrat SS-Sturmbannführer (Major) - A2b 7 000-9 700 Oberregierungs-und Kriminalrat SS-Obersturmbannführer <


secret police

The term SiPo was also used to describe security police force officials (but not the SD members of the RSHA). Grades and pay 1938-1945 Officials of the Sicherheitspolizei belonged to Kripo and Gestapo which both had the same grade structure and pay grades as civil servants. class "wikitable" - bgcolor "F1F1F1" ! align "left" width "100" Pay Grade Siegfried Beer, "Die Gestapostelle Linz, 1938–1945. Eine dokumentarische Rekonstruktion auf Basis der Recherchen des amerikanischen Militärgeheimdienstes CIC MIS aus dem Jahre 1946." Klaus Luger Johann Mayr (red.), ''Stadtgesellschaft. Werte und Positionen. Bürgermeister Franz Dobusch zum 60. Geburtstag gewidmet'' (Linz 2011): 315–356. ! Annual Pay in Reichsmark ! align "left" width "100" Grades in the junior executive service ( einfachen Vollzugsdienst der Sicherheitspolizei) ! align "left" width "100" Grades in the senior executive service (leitenden Vollzugsdienst der Sicherheitspolizei) ! align "left" width "150" Corresponding rank in SS (in Wehrmacht-Heer) Andrew Mollo, ''Uniforms of the SS'', vol. 5: "Sicherheitsdienst und Sicherheitspolizei 1931-1945" (London 1971). - A8c2 2 160 - 2 340 Kriminalassistent SS-Oberscharführer (Feldwebel) - A7c A8a 2 000-3 000 Kriminaloberassistent SS-Hauptscharführer (Oberfeldwebel) - A7a 2 350-3 500 Kriminalsekretär SS-Untersturmführer (Leutnant) - A5b 2 300-4 200 Kriminalobersekretär SS-Untersturmführer (Leutnant) - A4c2 2 800-5000 Kriminalinspektor SS-Obersturmführer (Oberleutnant) - A4c1

Wehrmacht Retrieved 2013-11-26 Cold War Following the end of the Second World War, the phrase ''Sicherheitspolizei'' appeared in East Germany as a title for some components of the East German secret police forces. See also * Glossary of Nazi Germany Notes References *

by Interpol agents, and died of myocardial infarction in jail before he could be extradited, on 30 August 1986. Gente magazine, issue 2417 In mid 1935, Kappler applied for transfer to the full time SS and submitted an application to join the ''Sicherheitspolizei'' (Secret Police). In January 1936, he was promoted to the rank of SS-Scharführer (Sergeant) and assigned to duty at the Gestapo main


beer

"left" width "100" Pay Grade Siegfried Beer, "Die Gestapostelle Linz, 1938–1945. Eine dokumentarische Rekonstruktion auf Basis der Recherchen des amerikanischen Militärgeheimdienstes CIC MIS aus dem Jahre 1946." Klaus Luger Johann Mayr (red.), ''Stadtgesellschaft. Werte und Positionen. Bürgermeister Franz Dobusch zum 60. Geburtstag gewidmet'' (Linz 2011): 315–356. ! Annual Pay in Reichsmark ref name "Beer

" ! align "left" width "100" Grades in the junior executive service ( einfachen Vollzugsdienst der Sicherheitspolizei) ! align "left" width "100" Grades in the senior executive service (leitenden Vollzugsdienst der Sicherheitspolizei) ! align "left" width "150" Corresponding rank in SS (in Wehrmacht-Heer) ref name

"Beer" Andrew Mollo, ''Uniforms of the SS'', vol. 5: "Sicherheitsdienst und Sicherheitspolizei 1931-1945" (London 1971). - A8c2 2 160 - 2 340 Kriminalassistent SS-Oberscharführer (Feldwebel) - A7c A8a 2 000-3 000 Kriminaloberassistent SS-Hauptscharführer (Oberfeldwebel) - A7a 2 350-3 500 Kriminalsekretär SS-Untersturmführer (Leutnant) - A5b 2

Sicherheitspolizei

The '''''Sicherheitspolizei''''' ( ), often abbreviated as '''''SiPo''''', was a term used in Germany for their security police. In the Nazi (Nazi Germany) era it was used to describe the state political and criminal investigation security agencies. It was made up by the combined forces of the Gestapo (secret state police) and the Kripo (criminal police) between 1936 and 1939. As a formal agency, the SiPo was folded into the RSHA in 1939, but the term continued to be used informally until the end of the Third Reich.

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