Sicherheitsdienst

What is Sicherheitsdienst known for?


film battle

(film) The Battle of the Bulge '' (1965), Luchino Visconti's ''The Damned (The Damned (1969 film))'' (1969), and ''Kelly's Heroes'' (1970). He played a Luftwaffe general in Battle of Britain (Battle of Britain (film)) (1969). He also continued to work in both Germany and Italy in a wide variety of films from dramas and comedies to spaghetti westerns. He also made regular appearances on German television. His last appearance was in the TV series ''War and Remembrance'' (1988). He


acting making

for acting, making his début at the City Theatre in Konstanz in 1959. He then began to take supporting roles in films. He made his first appearance in English-language films as an SD (Sicherheitsdienst) officer (who captures Richard Attenborough) in ''The Great Escape (The Great Escape (film))'' (1963). With his broad face, broken nose and distinctive white-blond hair, he would go on to play variations on the role of German officers in a series of films, notably '' Battle of the Bulge


critical role

Facilities such as Chelmno, Maydenek, Sobibor, Treblinka, and Auschwitz have their origins in the planning actions undertaken by Heydrich. Wright (1968). ''The Ordeal of Total War, 1939-1945'', p. 127. Heydrich remained chief of the Security Police (SiPo) and the SD (through the RSHA) until his assassination in 1942, after which Ernst Kaltenbrunner was named chief by Himmler on 30 January 1943, and remained there until the end of the war. Lumsden, Robin. ''A Collector's Guide To: The Allgemeine – SS'', p 84. The SD was declared a criminal organization after the war and its members were tried as war criminals at Nuremberg (Nuremberg Trials). Twenty-four ''Einsatzgruppen'' commanders (men with the SD sleeve diamond on their uniforms) were tried after the war, becoming infamous for their brutality. See: Rhodes (2003). ''Masters of Death: The SS-Einsatzgruppen and the Invention of the Holocaust'', p. 274. Whatever their original purpose, the SD and SS were ultimately created to identify and eradicate internal enemies of the State, as well as to pacify, subjugate, and exploit conquered territories and peoples. Mayer (2012). ''Why Did the Heavens Not Darken?: The “Final Solution” in History'', p. 162. thumb German passport extended by the SD in Norway, March 1945. (File:German passport extended by the SD in Norway, March 1945..jpg) Organization thumb Poster (1941) with Ordnungspolizei and Sicherheitspolizei (File:Berlin.Gestapo Museum 007.JPG) By 1933, the organization was known as the SS ''SD-Amt'' and, in 1934, became the official security organization of the entire Nazi Party. Consisting at first of paid agents and a few hundred unpaid informants scattered across Germany, the SD was quickly professionalized under Heydrich, who commissioned National Socialist academics and lawyers to ensure that the SS and the SD in particular, operated "within the framework of National Socialist ideology." Weale (2012). ''Army of Evil: A History of the SS'', p. 130. Heydrich was given the power to select men for the SD from among any of the SS component commands since Himmler considered the organization of the SD so important. Browder (1996). ''Hitler's Enforcers: The Gestapo and the SS Security Service in the Nazi Revolution'', p. 116. In 1939, the SD was divided into two offices, the ''Inland-SD'' and ''Ausland-SD'', and placed under the authority of the RSHA. By 1941, the SD had been organized into the following internal sections: Inland-SD The ''Inland-SD'' (Office II) was originally headed by SS-Colonel Hermann Behrends until September 1939 and it was within this organization that Adolf Eichmann began working out the details for the Final Solution of the Jewish problem. Weale (2012). ''Army of Evil: A History of the SS'', p. 135. The ''Inland SD'' was responsible for intelligence and security within Germany and was divided into the following sub-offices: * Department A (Law and Legal Structures) * Department B (Race and Ethnic Matters) * Department C (Cultural and Religious Matters) * Department D (Industry and Commerce) * Department E (High Society) After 27 September 1939, (Office II) became officially ''Amt'' III (department III), the SD-Inland of the RSHA. Otto Ohlendorf was named the Chief of ''Amt'' III. Ausland-SD The ''Ausland-SD'' (Office III) was the civilian foreign intelligence agency of the Third Reich and was "nominally commanded by Heydrich, but his chief of staff was SS-Colonel Heinz Jost." Weale (2012). ''Army of Evil: A History of the SS'', p. 136. Jost ran the department until March 1942. Jost was fired from his position as Chief of ''Ausland-SD'' which, as of September 1939, had officially become known as ''Amt'' VI (department VI) of the RSHA. Doerries, ''Hitler's Last Chief of Foreign Intelligence'', pp. 21, 80. Jost's place was taken by ''Brigadeführer'' Walter Schellenberg, a deputy of Heydrich. After the July 20 Plot in 1944, the ''Ausland-SD'' took over the functions of the ''Abwehr'' (military intelligence). The ''Ausland-SD'' was divided into the following sections: * Department A (Organization and Administration) * Department B (Espionage in the West) * Department C (Espionage in the Soviet Union and Japan) * Department D (Espionage in the American sphere) * Department E (Espionage in Eastern Europe) * Department F (Technical Matters) thumb right upright Members of the ''Sicherheitsdienst'' during a łapanka (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1971-067-07, Sicherheitsdienst in Polen, Razzia.jpg) (random arrest) in occupied Poland Membership Given the nature of the intelligence operations assigned to the SD, there were clear delineations between what constituted a full member (''Mitglieder'') of the SD and those who were considered "associates" (''Mitarbeiter'') with a further subset for clerical support personnel (typists, file clerks, etc.) who were connoted as V-persons (''Vertrauensleute''). Browder (1996). ''Hitler's Enforcers: The Gestapo and the SS Security Service in the Nazi Revolution'', p. 131. All SD personnel, whether simply associates or full members were required to swear an oath of secrecy, had to meet all the requirements for SS membership, were assigned SD code numbers (''Chiffre Nummer'') and if they were "above the level of V-person" they had to carry "an SD identification card." Browder (1996). ''Hitler's Enforcers: The Gestapo and the SS Security Service in the Nazi Revolution'', pp. 133-134. The vast majority of early SD members were relatively young, but the officers were typically older by comparison; nevertheless, the average age of an SD member was approximately 2 years older than the average Nazi Party member. Kater (1983). ''The Nazi Party: A Social Profile of Members and Leaders, 1919-1945'', p. 141, p. 261. Much like the Nazi revolution in general, membership in the SS and the SD appealed more to the impressionable youth. Ziegler (1989). ''Nazi Germany's New Aristocracy: The SS Leadership, 1925-1939'', pp. 59-79. Most SD members were Protestant by faith, had served in the military, and generally had a significant amount of education, representing "an educated elite" in the general sense - with about 14 percent of them earning doctorate degrees. Browder (1996). ''Hitler's Enforcers: The Gestapo and the SS Security Service in the Nazi Revolution'', pp. 136-138. Heydrich viewed the SD as spiritual-elite leaders within the SS and the "cream of the cream of the NSDAP." Dederichs (2006). ''Heydrich: The Face of Evil'', p. 53. According to historian George C. Browder, "SD men represented no pathological or psychically susceptible group. Few were wild or extreme Nazi fanatics. In those respects they were 'ordinary men'. Yet in most other respects, they were an extraordinary mix of men, drawn together by a unique mix of missions." Browder (1996). ''Hitler's Enforcers: The Gestapo and the SS Security Service in the Nazi Revolution'', p. 174. Along with members of the Gestapo, SD personnel were "regarded with a mixture of fear and foreboding," and people wanted as little to do with them as possible. Gellately (1992). ''The Gestapo and German Society: Enforcing Racial Policy, 1933-1945'', p. 143. Belonging to the security apparatus of the Third Reich obviously had its advantages but it was also fraught with occupationally related social disadvantages as well, and if post-war descriptions of the SD by historians are any indication, membership therein implied being a part of a "ubiquitous secret society" which was "sinister" and a "messenger of terror" not just for the German population


extraordinary mix

Revolution'', pp. 136-138. Heydrich viewed the SD as spiritual-elite leaders within the SS and the "cream of the cream of the NSDAP." Dederichs (2006). ''Heydrich: The Face of Evil'', p. 53. According to historian George C. Browder, "SD men represented no pathological or psychically susceptible group. Few were wild or extreme Nazi fanatics. In those respects they were 'ordinary men'. Yet in most other respects, they were an extraordinary mix


made regular

(film) The Battle of the Bulge '' (1965), Luchino Visconti's ''The Damned (The Damned (1969 film))'' (1969), and ''Kelly's Heroes'' (1970). He played a Luftwaffe general in Battle of Britain (Battle of Britain (film)) (1969). He also continued to work in both Germany and Italy in a wide variety of films from dramas and comedies to spaghetti westerns. He also made regular appearances on German television. His last appearance was in the TV series ''War and Remembrance'' (1988). He has been variously credited as ''Charles Albert'', ''Charles Alberty'' and ''Carlo Alberti''. Upon the German takeover, SD (Sicherheitsdienst) leader Ernst Kaltenbrunner reorganized the Guard of Great Albania into the Albanian National Socialist Party, which had formal control of Albania. German control over Albania was looser than in other territories; the Albanian Nazi government did not expand systematic persecution of Jews to deportation or killings. Albanian volunteers did, however, form an SS (Schutzstaffel) division, the 21st Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Skanderbeg (1st Albanian). thumb 120px left Konrāds Kalējs (Image:Konrads Kalejs.jpg), wartime photo The '''Arajs Kommando''' (also: ''Sonderkommando Arajs''), led by SS-Sturmbannführer Viktors Arājs, was a unit of Latvian Auxiliary Police ( Albert Bruce Matthews (Bruce Matthews (Canadian Army officer)) Aftermath In 1830 Albert had acquired a city palace in Berlin on Wilhelmstraße, then called ''Prinz-Albrecht-Palais''. An adjacent street off Wilhelmstraße laid out in 1891 was named ''Prinz-Albrecht-Straße''. After the Nazi ''Machtergreifung'' it became notorious as the seat of the Gestapo and the Reichsführer-SS. The ''Prinz-Albrecht-Palais'' itself from 1934 served as the headquarters of the SS Sicherheitsdienst under Reinhard Heydrich, from 1939 the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA). In 1944 the building was heavily damaged by air raids (Bombing of Berlin in World War II) and finally demolished in 1955. Since 1951 the street is named Niederkirchnerstraße, the area is now part of the Topography of Terror project. In 1940, Landau transferred to KdS SD (Sicherheitsdienst) in Radom governed by the General Government where he met typist Gertrude, to whom he later addressed his letters.


quot trademark

in 5 episodes out of 18, he usually stole the show. One of his "trademark" sayings was "I hate the sight of a man being beaten... unless I am the one doing the beating". Nazi official Six joined the Nazi party in 1930 with member number 245,670 and the Sturmabteilung (SA) in 1932, for whom he was a student


called white

Strauch Commander of Einsatzkommando 2 (Einsatzgruppen), anschliessend commander of two Nazi organizations, the Security Police ( German: Sicherheitspolizei), or SiPo, and the Security Service ( German: Sicherheitsdienst, or SD, first in Belarus (then called White Russia or White Ruthenia) and later in Belgium. In October 1944, he was transferred to the military branch of the SS (Waffen-SS). 19.312 Walter Vollmer SD (Sicherheitsdienst) during the war. KGB double agent in CIA-sponsored West German Gehlen Organization (Reinhard Gehlen#Gehlen Organization) 21889 Leopold von Mildenstein Head of SD (Sicherheitsdienst)'s Jewish Affairs Section (II 112), August 1934 to June 1936; promoter of co-operation between Nazi Party and Zionism Karl Silberbauer Vienna Gestapo;SD (Sicherheitsdienst) at the Hague; Arrested Anne Frank '''Paul Blobel''' (August 13, 1894 – June 8, 1951) was a German Nazi war criminal, an SS (Schutzstaffel)-Standartenführer (Colonel) and a member of the SD (Sicherheitsdienst). Born in the city of Potsdam, he participated in the First World War, where by all accounts he served well and was decorated with the Iron Cross first class. After the war, Blobel studied architecture and practiced this profession from 1924 until 1931, when upon losing his job, he joined the Nazi Party, the SA (Sturmabteilung) and the SS (he had joined all of these by 1 December 1931). Albert Bruce Matthews (Bruce Matthews (Canadian Army officer)) Aftermath In 1830 Albert had acquired a city palace in Berlin on Wilhelmstraße, then called ''Prinz-Albrecht-Palais''. An adjacent street off Wilhelmstraße laid out in 1891 was named ''Prinz-Albrecht-Straße''. After the Nazi ''Machtergreifung'' it became notorious as the seat of the Gestapo and the Reichsführer-SS. The ''Prinz-Albrecht-Palais'' itself from 1934 served as the headquarters of the SS Sicherheitsdienst under Reinhard Heydrich, from 1939 the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA). In 1944 the building was heavily damaged by air raids (Bombing of Berlin in World War II) and finally demolished in 1955. Since 1951 the street is named Niederkirchnerstraße, the area is now part of the Topography of Terror project. In 1940, Landau transferred to KdS SD (Sicherheitsdienst) in Radom governed by the General Government where he met typist Gertrude, to whom he later addressed his letters.


intelligence

minister2_pfo chief1_name ''SS-Obergruppenführer'' Reinhard Heydrich chief1_position ''Chef der Sicherheitspolizei und des SD'' 1931-1939; Chef des RSHA 1939-1942 chief2_name ''Reichsführer-SS'' Heinrich Himmler chief2_position Chef des RSHA 1942-1943 (acting) chief3_name ''SS-Obergruppenführer'' Dr. Ernst Kaltenbrunner chief3_position Chef des RSHA 1943-1945 agency_type Intelligence Service parent_agency Image:Flag

Schutzstaffel.svg 23px ''Allgemeine SS'' RSHA child1_agency child2_agency child3_agency website footnotes '''''Sicherheitsdienst''''' ( ), full title '''''Sicherheitsdienst des Reichsführers-SS''''', or '''SD''', was the intelligence agency of the SS (Schutzstaffel) and the Nazi Party in Nazi Germany. The organization was the first Nazi Party intelligence organization to be established and was considered

’ with the ''Sturmabteilung'' (SA) for influence within the Third Reich. Himmler distrusted the SA and came to deplore the ‘rabble-rousing’ brownshirts (despite once having been a member) and what they considered to be the indecent sexual deviants amid its leadership. Blandford (2001). ''SS Intelligence: The Nazi Secret Service'', pp. 47-51. At least one pretext to secure additional influence for Himmler's SS and Heydrich's SD in "protecting" Hitler


personal power

, were involved in the 20 July 1944 plot (20 July plot) to assassinate Hitler. This prompted Hitler to disband the ''Abwehr'' and make Himmler's Security Service (Sicherheitsdienst) (''Sicherheitsdienst'', or SD) the sole intelligence service of the Third Reich. This increased Himmler's personal power. 20 July plot It was determined that leaders of German Military Intelligence (the ''Abwehr''), including its head, Admiral Wilhelm Canaris

, were involved in the 20 July 1944 plot (20 July plot) to assassinate Hitler. This prompted Hitler to disband the ''Abwehr'' and make Himmler's Security Service (Sicherheitsdienst) (''Sicherheitsdienst'', or SD) the sole intelligence service of the Third Reich. This increased Himmler's personal power. As World War II went on, Ribbentrop's once-friendly relations with the SS became increasingly strained. In January 1941, the nadir of SS-''Auswärtiges Amt


Reichsarbeitsdienst

was the "right-hand man" to Himmler, and considered a principal architect of the Night of the Long Knives and the Final Solution. Assassinated in 1942 by British-trained Czech commandos. * Konstantin Hierl - Head of the Reichsarbeitsdienst and an associate of Adolf Hitler before he came to power. thumb A Zygalski sheets Zygalski perforated sheet (File:Płachta Zygalskiego - decrypting Enigma.jpg) (1938) The system of pre-defining the indicator setting for the day

Sicherheitsdienst

'''''Sicherheitsdienst''''' ( ), full title '''''Sicherheitsdienst des Reichsführers-SS''''', or '''SD''', was the intelligence agency of the SS (Schutzstaffel) and the Nazi Party in Nazi Germany. The organization was the first Nazi Party intelligence organization to be established and was considered a sister organization with the Gestapo, which the SS had infiltrated heavily after 1934. Between 1933 and 1939, the SD was administered as an independent SS office, after which it was transferred to the authority of the Reich Main Security Office (''Reichssicherheitshauptamt'', or RSHA (SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt)), as one of its seven departments offices. McNab, Chris. ''The SS: 1923–1945'', p. 41. Its first director, Reinhard Heydrich, intended for the SD to bring every single individual within the Third Reich's reach under "continuous supervision." Krausnick, Helmut, et al. ''Anatomy of the SS State'', pp. 166-167.

Following Germany's defeat in World War II, the SD was declared a criminal organisation at the Nuremberg Trials, along with the rest of Reinhard Heydrich's Reich Security Main Office (SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt) (including the Gestapo) both individually and as branches of the SS (Schutzstaffel) in the collective. ''Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression'' (1946), pp. 91-102. Heydrich's successor, Ernst Kaltenbrunner, was sentenced to death for war crimes at the Nuremberg Tribunals and hanged in 1946. Weale (2012). ''Army of Evil: A History of the SS'', pp. 410-411.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017