Shelburne, Nova Scotia

What is Shelburne, Nova Scotia known for?


902

codes of Canada B0T 1W0 area_code 902 (Area code 902) blank_name Access Routes blank_info '''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)). History Early


618

Acadians. They set up a small fishing settlement known as Port Razoir in the late 17th century, named after the harbour's resemblance to an open razor (Straight razor). The Acadian fishing settlement was abandoned after repeated New England raids during Queen Anne's War in 1705, in which five Acadians were taken prisoner, and 1708. 618 "Shelburne", ''Place Names of Nova Scotia'' Nova Scotia Archives and Records

Management'', p. 618 https: archive.org stream historyofwarsofn00penh#page 38 mode 1up search cape Raid on Port Roseway (1715) On May 14, 1715, New England naval commander Cyprian Southack attempted to create a permanent fishing station at a place he named "Cape Roseway" (now known as Shelburne). Shortly after he established himself, in July 1715 the Mi'kmaq raided the station (Military history of the Mi’kmaq people) and burned


treatment prominent

North America , settling predominantly in Nova Scotia. of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


title black

North America , settling predominantly in Nova Scotia. This latter group was largely made up of tradespeople and labourers, and many set up home in Birchtown near Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia). Some settled in New Brunswick, where they received discriminatory treatment; prominent leaders

in North America at the time. The indentured servants and newly freed slaves mostly settled in the town of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia). These two German attacks signified the end of the Battle of the St. Lawrence


year book

.statcan.gc.ca eng acyb_c1932-eng.aspx?opt eng 1932 193201410103_p.%20103.pdf , Censuses 1871–1931 Census 1941–1951 Census 1961 Canada Year Book 1974

: Censuses 1966, 1971 Canada Year Book 1988: Censuses 1981, 1986 Scotia.html, Census 1991–2006 Film production left thumb Present day barrel factory (File:shelburne nova scotia 2009.JPG) In 1992, Dock Street was the location for the filming of ''Mary Silliman's War'', based on a true story


extensive international

. The Cox family also built their own ships and conducted extensive international trade. The former MacKay shipyard was located in Shelburne at Black's Brook. Donald McKay, famous in the United States for the clippers which he built at Boston, began his shipbuilding career in Shelburne. He was born at Jordan Falls in 1810, and left the area at the age of 16 to apprentice in New York. Led by master shipbuilders such as Amos Pentz and James Havelock Harding, Shelburne shipyards built many fishing schooners in the banks fishing era, as well as a notable research yacht inspired by fishing schooners, the schooner ''Blue Dolphin'' (Blue Dolphin (schooner)) in 1926. In May 1945, following Germany's surrender, U-889 surrendered to the RCN at Shelburne, Nova Scotia. Buildings Many of Shelburne's buildings date back to Loyalist times. The Shelburne County Museum is a restored home built in 1787 by David Nairn, a cooper (cooper (profession)) from Scotland. The present-day Christ Church (Anglican) is on the site of the original building of the same name, which was designed by Loyalist Isaac Hildreth and consecrated by Bishop Charles Inglis (Charles Inglis (bishop)) in 1790. The original structure was destroyed by fire in 1971. Tottie's Store is thought to have been built by John Tottie about the year 1800. thumb 260px The Shelburne County Museum, on left. Building originally owned by David Nairn, a cooper from Scotland. (Image:Shelburnecountymuseum.jpg) In 1787, government distribution of provisions to the new settlers was terminated. As the settlement was not yet self-supporting, many settlers put their houses up for sale or abandoned them. They left for England, New Brunswick, Upper Canada, and the United States. About half the population of African Americans left, many going to the new colony of Freetown in West Africa (now Sierra Leone). By the 1820s, the population of Shelburne had dwindled to about 300. Present day Although much smaller today, Shelburne remains the capital of the county which bears its name. It was incorporated as a Town on April 4, 1907. Many descendants of the first-generation immigrant Loyalists still live in the area today. Fishing remains a primary industry. Other economic activities include tourism, ship building and repair, aquaculture, logging, fish processing, and the manufacture of barrels, institutional furniture, granite monuments, and marine supplies. In 2011, Halifax-based Irving Shipbuilding Company completed the renovation of the Shelburne Shipbuilding facility, which included the installation of North America's largest marine railway of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


fishing

Acadians. They set up a small fishing settlement known as Port Razoir in the late 17th century, named after the harbour's resemblance to an open razor (Straight razor). The Acadian fishing settlement was abandoned after repeated New England raids during Queen Anne's War in 1705, in which five Acadians were taken prisoner, and 1708. "Shelburne", ''Place Names of Nova Scotia'' Nova Scotia Archives and Records

Management'', p. 618 https: archive.org stream historyofwarsofn00penh#page 38 mode 1up search cape Raid on Port Roseway (1715) On May 14, 1715, New England naval commander Cyprian Southack attempted to create a permanent fishing station at a place he named "Cape Roseway" (now known as Shelburne). Shortly after he established himself, in July 1715 the Mi'kmaq raided the station (Military history of the Mi’kmaq people) and burned

harbour for seasonal shelter and repairs. Pirate Ned Low raided the New England fishing fleet at Shelburne Harbour in 1723, capturing 13 ships. Dan Conlin, ''Pirates of the Atlantic: Robbery, Murder and Mayhem off the Canadian East Coast'' (2009) Formac Publishing, p. 35-37. After the Acadian Expulsion in 1755, there were no settlers for several decades despite an abortive settlement attempt by Alexander McNutt (Alexander McNutt (colonisation)) in 1765


based program

Scotia Shelburne , but later settled in Fredericton. Brueggergosman learned of her African-American roots on ''Who Do You Think You Are'', a British-based program bought by the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation). According to Y-DNA genetic testing of her brother, it is likely their direct-line paternal African ancestors came from the Bassa (Bassa (Cameroon)) people of Cameroon. In 1989, transmitters were added in Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia), Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia), and Wolfville (Wolfville, Nova Scotia). The transmitter network was expanded further in 1993 to include service to Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia), New Glasgow (New Glasgow, Nova Scotia), and Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia). free_label Locations free Halifax (Halifax Urban Area) Dartmouth (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia) Springhill (Springhill, Nova Scotia) Kentville (Kentville, Nova Scotia) Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Nova Scotia) Sydney (Sydney, Nova Scotia) Pictou (Pictou, Nova Scotia) Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia) Port Hawkesbury (Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia) Truro (Truro, Nova Scotia) Middleton (Middleton, Nova Scotia) Lawrencetown (Lawrencetown, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia) Yarmouth (Yarmouth, Nova Scotia) website www.nscc.ca Windsor West: Rob Spring Spring was born in 1964 in Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia. He moved to Windsor (Windsor, Ontario) in his youth, graduated from Essex District High School in 1982, and entered the workforce after his graduation. He served two years with the 21st Windsor Service Battalion as a reservist vehicle technician. Spring is an auto worker, and a veteran environmental activist in Windsor (Windsor, Ontario). He has served on the city's Environmental Advisory Committee, has been a member of the Citizens Environmental Alliance since 1985 (''Windsor Star'', 25 September 1998), and chaired the Canadian Auto Workers Local 444 environmental committee (''Windsor Star'', 22 October 1999). In 1998, he was part of a successful protest against the construction of a rock-crushing facility near a residential area (''Windsor Star'', 20 October 1998). He was also a member of Friends of Marshfield Woods in 2000, and unsuccessfully tried to prevent a logging operation in the area (''Windsor Star'', 17 January 2000). Alleged military search near Shelburne While the official story of the incident ends here, further evidence attributed to various military and civilian witnesses might imply a highly secretive military search involving a small flotilla of Royal Canadian Navy and United States Navy ships about of land fell through as the land boom in Nova Scotia petered out by the mid 1760s. McNutt spent time in the later part of the decade living with his brother on McNutt Island (McNutts Island, Nova Scotia) in Rosebay Harbour (near present-day Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia)) as well as in the Cobequid region where he appeared in the 1771 census. He seems to have supported himself at this time cutting timber. He was ordered to pay several debts and forced to sell his land at Port Roseway. Other land he held in Pictou (Pictou County, Nova Scotia), the Minas Basin, and Beaver Harbour (Beaver Harbour, Nova Scotia) were escheated. He left the colony around 1780, returned around 1786, and left for good in 1794 and finally settled in Rockbridge County, Virginia in 1796. Biography Born in Formby (Lancashire, England), W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', Toronto-London, Macmillan, revised ed. 1963, p. 116. Carr was educated in Scotland, and went to sea at the age of fourteen. W. Stewart Wallace (ed), ''The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography'', ''op. cit.'', p. 116. He served as Navigating Officer (Officer (armed forces)) of H.M.S. (Her Majesty's Ship) Submarines during World War One (World War I) (see : Royal Navy Submarine Service) and as Naval Control Officer and Senior Naval Officer in World War Two (World War II). In World War II he was Naval Control Officer for the St. Lawrence, then Staff Officer Operations at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, then Senior Naval Officer at Goose Bay, Labrador. As an Officer on the staff of Commodore Reginald W. Brock he organized the 7th Victory Loan for the twenty-two Royal Canadian Naval Training Divisions. These biographical details are provided by the Editor's preface of William Guy Carr, ''Pawns in the Game'', Omni Christian Book Club 1993 and ''Satan, prince of this World'', Palmdale, CA, Omni Publications, 1997


shelburne nova scotia

: Imperial, if Imperial (metric) is desired-- area_footnotes 2011 Statistics Canada Community Profile: Shelburne, Nova Scotia area_total_km2

codes of Canada B0T 1W0 area_code 902 (Area code 902) blank_name Access Routes blank_info '''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)). History Early


online news

over the 30-year term of the contract. Cooke Aquaculture Ltd. has chosen Shelburne as site for a substantial increase in their salmon farming operation. Plans are to increase the number of farms in the area to eight or more and construct a fish processing plant employing 350 people. In February 2012, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency quarantined one site due to a suspected Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) occurrence. The area is served by a weekly newspaper, a large online news operation

Shelburne, Nova Scotia

'''Shelburne''' is a town located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Canada. It is the seat of the Municipal District of Shelburne (Shelburne, Nova Scotia (municipal district)).

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017