Santa María Atzompa

What is Santa María Atzompa known for?


industry construction

leucocephala guaje , mesquite, white sapote and American pepper (Schinus molle). Wildlife includes rabbits, hares, frogs, lizards and a wide variety of birds and insects. Agriculture employs about 7% of the population, industry, construction and mining 40% and commerce, tourism and services employ 50%. References


sweet+called

and the evening concludes with a dance and amusement rides. Holy Week celebrations here are a mixture of Christian and pagan elements. Holy Tuesday is celebrated at home with family and friends. The traditional drink for this day is called "tejate" and is prepared by a designated man and either his mother or his wife. The traditional meal s fish with white beans, with a sweet called "maja blanca" made from ground rice, milk, cinnamon and sugar


population industry

leucocephala guaje , mesquite, white sapote and American pepper (Schinus molle). Wildlife includes rabbits, hares, frogs, lizards and a wide variety of birds and insects. Agriculture employs about 7% of the population, industry, construction and mining 40% and commerce, tourism and services employ 50%. References


place bringing

;mayordomo," who is chosen each year. The mayordomo is in charge of an image called the "Señor del Coro" which is a crucifix to which has been attributed miracles. On the second night, a new mayordomo is chosen for the coming year and when the process is concluded, fireworks are set off to allow the village to know. Then a procession to the new house takes place, bringing food, mezcal and a live turkey. The feast of Our Lady


local style

is an older, respected member of the community, who acts as a master of ceremonies, asking guests to enjoy the food and beverages prepared for the occasion. Guelaguetza is celebrated each year in July, with food drink and dance. Las Posadas are celebrated in December with a local style of atole called "champurrado." Carnaval (Carnival) is a two-day celebration here, celebrated at the house of a "


ball

of the ancient Zapotec (Zapotec peoples) city of Monte Albán. Since its founding, pottery making has been a major economic activity and the town is currently known for its green-glazed pottery. This pottery used to be shipped all over Mexico and exported to the United States but today most of this pottery is sold locally. Beginning in 2009, there has been excavation at the Atzompa archeological site, leading to the discovery of a 45-meter Mesoamerican ball court, which has been determined

to have been on the principal one for Monte Alban. Today, the town is rustic with the smoke of wood-fired pottery kilns ever present. Poverty has been a concern for the town

and a pyramidal platform. However, the main find has been a 45-meter-long Mesoamerican ball court with two smaller courts next to it. These courts are surrounded pyramidal structures. The 45-meter court is the largest ever found in the Monte Alban area and investigations indicate that this was the principal ball court for the city, rather than any of the ball courts that are in the Monte Alban site itself. This ball court is situated such that players would have full view


family quot

with Mexican marigolds and other flowers. These people are greeted on the morning of 31 October by municipal authorities who bring a musical band and offer tea and coffee. Religious brotherhoods also arrive with banners and standards. On November 1, the dead continue to be honored in the home, with a traditional meal of mole, tamales and beans. On 2 November, is called the "day of godchildren, "co-parents" (compadres), friends and family" as the dead are often referred to. On this day are eaten bread, hot chocolate and fruit, with the aim of saying goodbye to the deceased who have been visiting. Late in the day, another meal with mezcal or beer may be served. The Fiesta del Nacimiento (Feast of the Birth) occurs at the house of the mayordomo of a Christ child image. This mayordomo serves for a year and there is a minimum of a five-year wait to be the mayordomo. A daughter of the mayordomo is chosen to sing a lullaby to the image. The event extends from the 24th to the 26th of December. On the 24th, a large number of children gather at the house of the mayordomo to participate in the lullaby. The mayordomo's daughter leads this event and is called the "madrina del Niño Dios" (godmother of the Christ Child). After the lullaby, a meal is served to all the participants, which is usually fish with white beans, hot chocolate and bread. After this, there is a procession in the streets with a musical band towards the church where Mass (Mass (liturgy)) is held. The 25th and 26th are mostly celebrated at home, with food and drink. Green glazed pottery of Atzompa


making

of the ancient Zapotec (Zapotec peoples) city of Monte Albán. Since its founding, pottery making has been a major economic activity and the town is currently known for its green-glazed pottery. This pottery used to be shipped all over Mexico and exported to the United States but today most of this pottery is sold locally. Beginning in 2009, there has been excavation at the Atzompa archeological site, leading to the discovery of a 45-meter Mesoamerican ball court, which has been determined

below, partly as a bulwark against the neighboring Mixtec. There is also evidence that the town served as the last way station for quarried stone making its way to the construction of the last buildings in the city of Monte Alban. Objects found at the site include local barro negro pottery as well as obsidian and other objects showing trade connections with areas such as Teotihuacan, Sierra de las Navajas in Hidalgo (Hidalgo (state)) and Guatemala. ref name "pelota

Julia last Preston url http: www.nytimes.com 1996 06 14 world santa-maria-atzompa-journal-pots-that-poison-and-potters-facing-broken-lives.html?pagewanted 1 newspaper New York Times location New York date June 14, 1996 accessdate March 18, 2010 Today, most of the community's distinctive green-glazed pottery is sold in neighboring Oaxaca city, with most families here making a subsistence living through that and by growing corn. ref name "colorverde" >


family

and the groom, generally taking place on Sunday. On Sunday morning, the groom's parents, accompanied by family, arrive early in the morning to the bride's house with a musical band, flowers and an incense burner. They will accompany the bride to the church. The bride's dress is usually paid for by the groom's family, but if not, the groom's family will sponsor the lunch. The wedding proper takes place after this lunch. After the wedding ceremony, the bride returns home to receive the blessing of her

parents, which is celebrated by fireworks. Another meal is served for family and guests. After this, the groom's family brings three or four live turkeys to the bride's house as a symbolic bride price, accompanied by a band. Sometimes this traditional offering is replaced by dishes, clothes, other animals or other gifts. After this, the wedding is further celebrated with drinks and wedding cake. At weddings and other festivals, there is a person designated as the "Chigule." This person

and the evening concludes with a dance and amusement rides. Holy Week celebrations here are a mixture of Christian and pagan elements. Holy Tuesday is celebrated at home with family and friends. The traditional drink for this day is called "tejate" and is prepared by a designated man and either his mother or his wife. The traditional meal s fish with white beans, with a sweet called "maja blanca" made from ground rice, milk, cinnamon and sugar


distinctive green

Julia last Preston url http: www.nytimes.com 1996 06 14 world santa-maria-atzompa-journal-pots-that-poison-and-potters-facing-broken-lives.html?pagewanted 1 newspaper New York Times location New York date June 14, 1996 accessdate March 18, 2010 Today, most of the community's distinctive green-glazed pottery is sold in neighboring Oaxaca city, with most families here making a subsistence living through that and by growing corn. ref name "colorverde" >

Santa María Atzompa

'''Santa María Atzompa''' is a town and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) located in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, about five km from the state capital of Oaxaca (Oaxaca, Oaxaca). It is part of the Centro District (Centro District, Oaxaca) in the Valles Centrales region (Valles Centrales de Oaxaca).

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017