San Juan de los Lagos

What is San Juan de los Lagos known for?


simple

; The current structure dates from the 17th century. Its facade is simple, made of sandstone with a single tower that has Corinthian columns (Corinthian order) and vegetative reliefs. The portal is simple with a rounded arch. The choral window has a sandstone frame and niches above it with sculptures. The interior is a single nave with a main altar in Baroque style in white sandstone, with Solomonic columns that support a semicircular pediment. The rest of the decoration is simple with some

sculptures of saints on the walls. To the side of this chapel is a former hospital, which also has a simple facade and portal. The Capilla del Pocito is where, according to legend, a small girl brought forth a fresh water spring in 1663 by striking the area with a stone. The spring still flows. The Temple of Calvary dates from the 17th century, constructed in pink sandstone. It has the appearance of a Greek temple


traditional dance

As of 2010, there were 15,088 housing units in the municipality. Most housing is privately owned by its occupants, mostly with a poured concrete foundation and with walks of cinderblock, bricks or adobe. Roofs are mostly of poured concrete or vaults made with bricks. Basic services such as running water and electricity are available in about 90% of homes. Agriculture takes up about half of the municipality’s territory, with most farmland privately owned. It employs about 22% of the working population. Principle crops are corn, beans and sorghum, with livestock consisting of meat and dairy cattle, oxen, pigs, sheep, goats and domestic fowl. There is also some fish farming producing catfish, carp and mojarra for local consumption. There is some exploitation of mesquite trees for wood. Mining and industry employ about 24% of the working population. Mining mostly consists of sandstone production for construction with some deposits of marble and other construction materials. Most industry consists of food processing, much of which is destined for sale to the tourist market. This is particularly true for the production and sale of cajeta or dulce de leche. This is a common traditional product as the Los Altos region is the fifth highest producer of dairy products in the country. Other products include ice, construction materials, ironworking, textiles and furniture. Handcrafts include embroidered clothing for women as well as the weaving of wool items such as sarapes, rebozos, quezquémetls and other textiles, herbal medicines, leather items such as bags, belts and wallets are made as well as ceramics and carved stone items. Clothing for charros can be found here from heavily embroidered jackets and pants to embroidered belts called “piteado.” Another common handcraft is religious items for sale to visitors, such as reliquaries, candles, images of the Virgin and rosaries made from the local white stone. Many of the areas handcrafts are sold on the stores and street stalls around the main plaza and basilica. These items are either made locally or brought in from other states in central Mexico. Just under fifty percent of the working population is dedicated to commerce and services, with most of this related to tourism to the town of San Juan de los Lagos, followed by businesses catering to local, mostly primary, needs. This translates to a population of about 40,000 residents who cater to the needs of about seven million or so pilgrims per year. The town has frequent bus service, and is accessible by expressway. However, this tourism is almost purely domestic. Most English language guidebooks do not even mention San Juan de los Lagos. The municipality thumb Parish of Sangre de Cristo in Mezquitic (File:ParishSangreCristoMezquitic01.jpg) It has 260 active communities with a total population of 65,219 (2010); however most of these are extremely small and rural with only one community having more than 700 residents, the seat. Outside the town of San Juan, other important communities include Mezquitic de la Magdalena, Halconero de Arriba, La Sauceda, Antenas (Cañada de Pérez), El Sauz de Ibarra and San Antonio de la Barrera. In total, there are 298 named locations in the municipality, but 38 have been abandoned. In 2005, 111 spoke an indigenous language, up from 24 in 1995, and 95% are Catholic. The municipality has seventeen preschools, 65 primary schools, seven middle schools two high schools and one vocational technical school. About 90% of the population is literate; however, the rate


good time;;;

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands


good time

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands


good time;;;;;;;;

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands


major religious

It was placed firmly into Spanish control by Cristóbal de Oñate after he conquered the nearby Caxcans in Teocaltiche. The Mixtón Rebellion in the Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Mexico) area prompted measures to populate and fortify this area under the supervision of the Franciscans (Franciscan order) . San Juan’s origins date to 1542, when the indigenous population of a village called San Gaspar was sent here, naming the new village San Juan Bautista de Mezquititlán. However by the end of the 16th century, the town was still little more than a group of small houses, with a small hermitage. This hermitage, built by Friar Miguel de Bolonia, was dedicated to the Immaculate Conception. This structure was the first home of a very small image of the Virgin Mary, believed to have been brought to the area from Michoacán either by Bolonia or by Friar Antonio de Segovia. Over time, moths damaged the statue and it was packed away in a corner of the sacristy. It remained there until 1632 when it was part of the first major miracle ascribed to it. After this, the image was taken to Guadalajara to be restored, and it was then returned to San Juan. Pilgrimages soon began to the miraculous image, with pilgrims leaving valuable offerings, which permitted the building of larger and grander churches for the image. The first chapel to the image was built in 1638, which is now the Chapel of the First Miracle. From the 1542 to 1623, San Juan had been an indigenous community. Colonial authorities decided to “Hispanicize” the area, bringing in a large number of Spanish and mestizos from neighboring areas, mostly through land grants. Many of these new residents came from an area called Santa María de los Lagos which is now Lagos de Moreno. This prompted the changing of the town’s name to San Juan de los Lagos. Shortly after this influx of newcomers, the number of indigenous in the town dropped to less than one quarter. During the colonial era, the San Juan’s importance grew as a pilgrimage center because of the miracles ascribed to the Virgin Mary image. This influx of pilgrims also spurred the town’s development as a regional commercial center, as it provided a large concentration of potential customers. This led to an annual fair which coincided with the busiest pilgrimage season, the time around Candlemas. This economic impact became evident relatively early in the colonial period. San Juan had a number of advantages that led to its growing importance during the colonial period. First, there was a relative dearth of native pilgrimage sites in northern Mexico, as most sites are churches dedicated


working population

of the municipality’s territory, with most farmland privately owned. It employs about 22% of the working population. Principle crops are corn, beans and sorghum, with livestock consisting of meat and dairy cattle, oxen, pigs, sheep, goats and domestic fowl. There is also some fish farming producing catfish, carp and mojarra for local consumption. There is some exploitation of mesquite trees for wood. Mining and industry employ about 24% of the working

locally or brought in from other states in central Mexico. Just under fifty percent of the working population is dedicated to commerce and services, with most of this related to tourism to the town of San Juan de los Lagos, followed by businesses catering to local, mostly primary, needs. This translates to a population of about 40,000 residents who cater to the needs of about seven million or so pilgrims per year

population. Mining mostly consists of sandstone production for construction with some deposits of marble and other construction materials. Most industry consists of food processing, much of which is destined for sale to the tourist market. This is particularly true for the production and sale of cajeta or dulce de leche. This is a common traditional product as the Los Altos region is the fifth highest producer of dairy products in the country. ref name


good time;;

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands


good time;;;;;;

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands


good time;;;;;;;;;

of the road. This takes place all through the month of January. For that reason January is not a good time to visit. Do Buy *'''Plaster objects''' The town is blessed with hundreds of shops dedicated to plaster, among other materials, saints of all types, sizes and colors. These are bought mainly by priests for their churches, devout Catholics for their homes and small altars in every factory, restaurant, and business in Mexico. Near the Christmas season you may also find literally thousands

San Juan de los Lagos

'''San Juan de los Lagos''' is a town and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) located in the northeast corner of the state of Jalisco, Mexico, in a region known as Los Altos (Los Altos (Jalisco)). It is best known as the home of a small image of the Virgin Mary called Our Lady of San Juan de los Lagos or in Nahuatl Cihuapilli, which means “Great Lady.” Since the first major miracle ascribed to her in 1632, she has been venerated especially for cases involving mortal danger. The miracles ascribed to her have made the basilica in which she is found a major tourist attraction, which has shaped the town’s history to this day. The economy of the town is still heavily dependent on the flow of pilgrims which has amounted to between seven and nine million people per year.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017