Salla

What is Salla known for?


news year

in Finland railway line from Kemijärvi. In 2006, the Finnish Rail Administration announced proposals to close the line. Finnish Railway NewsYear 2006 The line formerly extended beyond Salla into Russia. Historical places border "1" class "wikitable" - ! Name !! Place !! Description !! WGS 84 (World Geodetic System) - The evangelic-Lutheran church


part+vast

is area of Oulanka National Park is shared between northern Kuusamo and neighboring Salla municipality. The landscape is dominated by pine forests, Oulankajoki river and its side branches with their sandbanks and rapids, and in the northern part vast marsh areas. In the wilderness live 30 species of mammals and 120 species of birds, including brown, stone and white-tailed eagle. Wolves (Eurasian Wolf) and Eurasian


significant political

debate rather than a political issue, since no significant political party supports the idea. thumb right 275px The Commander of Swedish volunteers General Ernst Linder (File:Ernst Linder and Carl August Ehrensvard.png) (right) and his Chief of Staff Carl August Ehrensvärd in Tornio. The '''Swedish Volunteer Corps''' ('''Svenska Frivilligkåren''') during the Winter War numbered 9,640. Sweden was officially non-belligerent, however


defensive

to concentrate at the Finnish-Soviet border, where they were arranged into defensive formations. Finland mobilised 16 infantry divisions, one cavalry brigade, and two jäger (Jäger (military)) brigades, which were standard infantry brigades, except for an armoured battalion in the 1st Jäger Brigade (Jaeger Brigade). There were separate battalions mostly formed from border guard units and used mainly for reconnaissance. Soviet military plans estimated that Finland would be able to mobilise only 10

of tanks, was outflanked by a Finnish battalion. The 112th retreated, leaving much of its heavy equipment and vehicles behind. Following this success, the Finns shuttled reinforcements down to the defensive line in front of Kemijärvi. The Soviets hammered the defensive line without success. The Finns counterattacked, and the Soviets were pushed back to a new defensive line where they stayed for the rest of the war. #Trotter2002 Trotter (2002


fighting ability

. The division also fought alongside a small German tank unit, the Panzer-Abteilung 211, which consisted entirely of captured French tanks. The attack was a failure. They were joined in the Spring of 1941, by the SS 6th and 7th Regiments and moved into positions at Salla in Northern Finland. The formation was well equipped but barely trained, and the commanding General Nikolaus von Falkenhorst did not trust their fighting ability. '''Kemi Sami


defensive line

of tanks, was outflanked by a Finnish battalion. The 112th retreated, leaving much of its heavy equipment and vehicles behind. Following this success, the Finns shuttled reinforcements down to the defensive line in front of Kemijärvi. The Soviets hammered the defensive line without success. The Finns counterattacked, and the Soviets were pushed back to a new defensive line where they stayed for the rest of the war. Trotter (2002) (#Trotter2002), pp. 178–180 Vuorenmaa (1999) (#Vuore1999), pp. 545–549 Volunteers arrived from various countries. By far, the largest foreign contingent came from neighbouring Sweden, which provided nearly 8,760 volunteers during the war. The Swedish Volunteer Corps (''Svenska Frivilligkåren''), formed from the Swedes, the Norwegians (727 men) and the Danes (1,010 men), fought on the northern front at Salla during the last weeks of the war. A Swedish unit of Gloster Gladiator, named "the Flight Regiment 19" (Lentorykmentti 19, LeR19; 19. flygflottilj, F19). Swedish AA-batteries with Bofors 40mm-guns were responsible for the air defence of northern Finland and the city of Turku. Jowett & Snodgrass (2006) (#Jow&Snod2006), pp. 21–22 Volunteers arrived from Estonia, Italy and Hungary (Hungarian Volunteers in the Winter War). Also, 350 American nationals of Finnish background (Finnish American) volunteered, and 210 volunteers of other nationalities made it to Finland before the war ended. Max Manus, a Norwegian (Norwegian people), fought in the Winter War before returning to Norway and achieving fame as a resistance fighter against the Nazi occupation of Norway. In total, Finland received 12,000 volunteers of whom 50 died during the war. Juutilainen (1999b) (#Juuti1999b), p. 776 Finland also had to cede a part of the region of Salla, the Kalastajansaarento peninsula in the Barents Sea, and four islands in the Gulf of Finland. The Hanko Peninsula was leased to the Soviet Union as a military base for 30 years. The region of Petsamo, captured by the Red Army during the war, was returned to Finland according to the treaty. Jowett & Snodgrass (2006) (#Jow&Snod2006), p. 10 Finland *The Karhunkierros Trail ( , in Salla) - flows to the Kovda River in Russia Cooperation with Germany A group of staff officers led by General Heinrichs left Finland on May 24 and participated in discussions with OKW in Salzburg on May 25 where the Germans informed them about the northern part of Operation Barbarossa. The Germans also presented their interest in using Finnish territory to attack from Petsamo to Murmansk and from Salla to Kandalaksha. Heinrichs presented Finnish interest in Eastern Karelia, but Germany recommended a passive stance. The negotiations continued the next day in Berlin with OKH, and contrary to the negotiations of the previous day, Germany wanted Finland to form a strong attack formation ready to strike on the eastern or western side of Lake Ladoga. The Finns promised to examine the proposal, but notified the Germans that they were only able to arrange supply to the Olonets-Petrozavodsk-line. The issue of mobilization was also discussed. It was decided that the Germans would send signal officers to enable confidential messaging to Mannerheim's headquarters in Mikkeli. Naval issues were discussed, mainly for securing sea lines over the Baltic Sea, but also possible usage of the Finnish navy in the upcoming war. During these negotiations the Finns presented a number of material requests ranging from grain and fuel to airplanes and radio equipment. Finland did not allow direct German attacks from its soil to the Soviet Union, so German forces in Petsamo and Salla had to hold their fire. Air attacks were also prohibited, and very bad weather in northern Finland helped to keep the Germans from flying. Only one attack from Southern Finland against the White Sea Canal was approved, but even that had to be cancelled due to bad weather. There were occasional individual and group level small arms shooting between Soviet and Finnish border guards, but otherwise the front was quiet.


early physical

volunteers of the Stridsgruppen SFK. '''Salla disease''' (SD), also called '''sialic acid storage disease''' or '''Finnish type sialuria''', lysosomal storage disease characterized by early physical impairment (disability) and mental retardation. It was first described in 1979, ref name "pmid420628"


heavy fighting

being transferred to Finnish (Finland) Lapland (Lapland (Finland)) in 1941. The division was part of the German XXXVI Corps (XXXVI Corps (Germany)) which also included SS Division Nord and the Finnish 6th Division. On July 1 the corps began its attack which was aimed at Kandalaksha on the White Sea coast. The division crossed the Finnish-Soviet Border just north of Salla. During the heavy fighting against the Soviet 122nd Division the SS Division Nord broke and fled. On July 8 the 169th occupied Salla. With the help of the Finnish 6th Division the Soviets were pushed back beyond the pre-Winter War borders. The Moscow Peace Treaty was signed on March 12, 1940, and at noon the following day the fighting ended. Finland ceded the Karelian Isthmus and Ladoga Karelia, part of Salla and Kalastajasaarento, and leased the Hanko naval base to the USSR, but remained a neutral state, albeit increasingly leaning toward Germany (see Interim Peace). In the Winter War Wallenius commanded the Finnish troops in Lapland. When the Winter War began, the Commander-in-Chief of Finnish troops Mannerheim (Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim) appointed Wallenius as the commander of the Lapland Group. The troops under his command, though outnumbered, repulsed Soviet (Soviet Union) troops at Salla and Petsamo (Pechengsky District). Once the front in Lapland had stabilized, Wallenius handed the command over to Swedish volunteers under Lieutenant General Ernst Linder in February 1940. Wallenius and most of his troops were sent to the southermost point of the front to western shore of the Bay of Viipuri (Bay of Vyborg), where the Red Army had crossed the frozen gulf. Wallenius protested this new assignment, thinking he was being punished for his past sins. The situation was critical and terrain totally different from what Wallenius and his men were used to. Wallenius failed to prevent the Red Army from gaining a foothold from the western shore of the bay, and there were reports that he was drinking heavily. Wallenius was dishonorably discharged in early March 1940, only after three days in command, and replaced by Lieutenant General Karl Lennart Oesch. Wallenius was removed from the Defence Forces officer lists. The '''Karelian question''' or '''Karelian issue''' ( , in Salla) - flows to the Kovda River in Russia Cooperation with Germany A group of staff officers led by General Heinrichs left Finland on May 24 and participated in discussions with OKW in Salzburg on May 25 where the Germans informed them about the northern part of Operation Barbarossa. The Germans also presented their interest in using Finnish territory to attack from Petsamo to Murmansk and from Salla to Kandalaksha. Heinrichs presented Finnish interest in Eastern Karelia, but Germany recommended a passive stance. The negotiations continued the next day in Berlin with OKH, and contrary to the negotiations of the previous day, Germany wanted Finland to form a strong attack formation ready to strike on the eastern or western side of Lake Ladoga. The Finns promised to examine the proposal, but notified the Germans that they were only able to arrange supply to the Olonets-Petrozavodsk-line. The issue of mobilization was also discussed. It was decided that the Germans would send signal officers to enable confidential messaging to Mannerheim's headquarters in Mikkeli. Naval issues were discussed, mainly for securing sea lines over the Baltic Sea, but also possible usage of the Finnish navy in the upcoming war. During these negotiations the Finns presented a number of material requests ranging from grain and fuel to airplanes and radio equipment. Finland did not allow direct German attacks from its soil to the Soviet Union, so German forces in Petsamo and Salla had to hold their fire. Air attacks were also prohibited, and very bad weather in northern Finland helped to keep the Germans from flying. Only one attack from Southern Finland against the White Sea Canal was approved, but even that had to be cancelled due to bad weather. There were occasional individual and group level small arms shooting between Soviet and Finnish border guards, but otherwise the front was quiet.


796

is area of Oulanka National Park is shared between northern Kuusamo and neighboring Salla municipality. The landscape is dominated by pine forests, Oulankajoki river and its side branches with their sandbanks and rapids, and in the northern part vast marsh areas. In the wilderness live 30 species of mammals and 120 species of birds, including brown, stone and white-tailed eagle. Wolves (Eurasian Wolf) and Eurasian


796'

is area of Oulanka National Park is shared between northern Kuusamo and neighboring Salla municipality. The landscape is dominated by pine forests, Oulankajoki river and its side branches with their sandbanks and rapids, and in the northern part vast marsh areas. In the wilderness live 30 species of mammals and 120 species of birds, including brown, stone and white-tailed eagle. Wolves (Eurasian Wolf) and Eurasian

Salla

'''Salla''' (''Kuolajärvi'' until 1936) is a municipality (municipalities of Finland) of Finland, located in Lapland (Lapland, Finland). The municipality has a population of ( ) and covers an area of of which is water. The population density is . Neighbour municipalities are Kemijärvi, Kuusamo, Pelkosenniemi, Posio and Savukoski.

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