Saintonge

What is Saintonge known for?


de quot

, which was celebrated with magnificence and attended by Philip IV. Among his first acts was the creation of nine French cardinals. thumb left Coinage of Pope Clement V. (Image:CoinageOfPopeClementV.jpg) birth_date Samuel Champlain 1567 birth_place Brouage (Hiers-Brouage), Province of Saintonge (Saintonge), France death_date December 25, 1635 (aged c. (circa) 68) DATE OF BIRTH PLACE OF BIRTH Brouage (Hiers-Brouage), Province of Saintonge (Saintonge), France DATE OF DEATH December 25, 1635 Early life and accession Francis was born at the ''Château de Cognac'' in the town of Cognac 400 km southwest of Paris, which at that time lay in the province of Saintonge, a part of the Duchy of Aquitaine. The town lies today in the French department of Charente. History Previously a part of Saintonge, '''Charente-Inférieure''' was one of the 83 original departments created during the French Revolution on 4 March 1790. On 4 September 1941, it was renamed Charente-Maritime. In total, moreover, there are over 2,500 troubadour lyrics available to be studied as lingusitic artifacts (Akehurst, 23). The troubadour tradition seems to have begun in western Aquitaine (Poitou and Saintonge) and Gascony, from there spreading over into eastern Aquitaine (Limousin (Limousin (province)) and Auvergne (Auvergne (province))) and Provence. At its height it had become popular in Languedoc and the regions of Rouergue, Toulouse, and Quercy (c. 1200). Finally, in the early 13th century it began to spread into first Italy and then Catalonia, whence to the rest of Spain. This development has been called the ''rayonnement des troubadours'' ( ) was a troubadour (fl. (floruit) 1140–1163 Aubrey, 8. Gaunt and Kay, 290. ) of the petty nobility of Saintonge. He was a great influence on the Sicilian School and is quoted in the ''Roman de la Rose''. About fifteen of his poems survive, including one ''planh'' and nine or ten ''cansos (Canso (song))''. The success of anti-tax rebellions in Saintonge and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English; the defences were poorly prepared and most towns attacked by the French surrendered immediately. The western part of the Duchy, the Agenais, was lost in a few weeks. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325. In 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession. He managed to raise an army of mercenaries and capture a number of strongholds in Agenais and Saintonge. However the political climate at home had changed. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his son Edward III (Edward III of England) under the regency of Queen Isabella (Isabella of France) and Roger Mortimer. The regents wanted peace and in the final treaty the loss of Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests abandoned.


original

in the province of Saintonge, a part of the Duchy of Aquitaine. The town lies today in the French department of Charente. History Previously a part of Saintonge, '''Charente-Inférieure''' was one of the 83 original departments created during the French Revolution on 4 March 1790. On 4 September 1941, it was renamed Charente-Maritime. In total, moreover, there are over 2,500 troubadour lyrics available to be studied as lingusitic artifacts (Akehurst, 23

had been severely wounded in 1652, obtained high favour at court in spite of the roughness of his manners and the general austerity which made the Parisian public recognize him as the original of ''Alceste'' in Molière's ''Le Misanthrope''. Jules Tellier, "La Guirlande de Julie" ''Le Parti national'', November 27, 1887 The West of France comprises the Pays de Nantes

University of America Press, 2000), p. 55 He had given his younger brother Fulk Saintonge as an appanage but in 1062, when it was attacked by Count Guy-Geoffrey of Poitou (William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine) (aka William VIII), Geoffrey failed to come to Fulk's support and Saintonge was lost. Henk Teunis, ''The Appeal to the Original Status: Social Justice in Anjou in the Eleventh Century'' (Hilversum: Uitgeverij Verloren, 2006), p. 75 In 1063


world history

and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English


appearance

. Saintonge was exported well through the 17th century. Acadians and French colonialists in Quebec and Eastern Canada imported many Saintonge ceramics, including bowls, plates, mugs and other types. Many Saintonge ceramic fragments have been found in context with 17th century colonialists and are often used as evidence of pre-British occupation of these areas. Slipped Saintonge is more consistent in colour and appearance than unslipped, having the benefit of an undercoating to regulate the process

107 BC) L. Cassius Longinus and his army was a welcome pretext to engage in an offensive war in Gaul whose proceeds permitted Caesar not only to fulfil his obligations to the numerous creditors he owed money to, but also to further strengthen his position within the late Republic. Cf. Birkhan, 243f. In this sense, even the character of Divico, who makes his appearance in the ''Commentarii'' half a century after his victory over L. Cassius Longinus, seems more like


singing dance

, the provinces of Vendée, Anjou and Maine, and the Poitou-Charentes region. Traditions of ballad-singing, dance-songs and fiddle-playing have survived, predominantly in Poitou and the Vendée. Jérôme Bujeaud collected extensively in the area, and his 2-volume work "Chants et chansons populaires des provinces de l'ouest: Poitou, Saintonge, Aunis et Angoumois" (Niort, 1866) remains the principal scholarly collection of music and songs. In recent decades John Wright and Claude Ribouillault (amongst others) have done much to collect, analyse and promote the surviving traditions. Terms By virtue of this treaty Edward III obtained, besides Guyenne and Gascony, Poitou, Saintonge and Aunis, Agenais, Périgord, Limousin (Limousin (province)), Quercy, Bigorre, the countship of Gauré, Angoumois, Rouergue, Montreuil-sur-Mer, Ponthieu, Calais, Sangatte, Ham (Ham, France) and the countship of Guînes. The king of England was to hold these free and clear, without doing homage (homage (medieval)) for them. Furthermore the treaty established that title to all the islands that the King of England now holds (Channel Islands) would no longer be under the Suzerainty of the King of France. After studies of law in Orléans and perhaps Bologna, de Rémi became bailli of Clermont (Clermont, Oise) in the county of Beauvaisis (1279), then seneschal of Poitou (1284) and the Saintonge (1287). Afterwards, he came to hold some of the most senior administrative offices in the realm: bailli of the Vermandois (1289), the Touraine (1291) and Senlis (Senlis, Oise) (1292). Substantial territory was lost to Angevin control due to the difficulties resulting from Geoffrey's poor rule and the subsequent civil war. Saintonge was lost, and Fulk had to give the Gâtinais to Philip I of France to placate the king. Throughout his reign he had to face the hostility of his stepmother, Agnes of Burgundy (Agnes of Burgundy, Duchess of Aquitaine), the third wife of his father, who had remarried to Geoffrey Martel, then count of Vendôme. He enterred into a war with Martel, who pretended to the government of the Saintonge. On 20 September 1034, he was captured in the field at Moncontour (Moncontour, Vienne), near Saint-Jouin-de-Marnes. He was freed in 1036, after nearly three years imprisonment, only by ceding the cities of Saintes (Saintes, Charente-Maritime) and Bordeaux. He immediately reopened the war, but was defeated again and had to cede the isle of Oléron. thumb left Saintonge (File:Saintonge polychrome dish in the style of Bernard Palissy mid 1500s found in London.jpg) polychrome dish in the style of Bernard Palissy, mid-1500s, excavated in London ( Museum of London) It appears that Palissy returned to his native district around 1539, married, and set up house in Saintes. Other than what he tells us in his autobiography, namely that he worked as a portrait-painter, glass-painter and land-surveyor, we have little record of how he lived during the first years of his married life. It is known that he was commissioned to survey and prepare a plan of the salt marshes near Saintes when the council of King Francis I (Francis I of France) determined to establish a salt tax in the Saintonge. The Poitevin-Saintongese language is spoken under its varieties Poitevin or Saintongese 18 in the administrative region Poitou-Charentes, the département of the Vendée, in the north of Gironde département (Gabaye Country of Blayese and north Libournese), in the south of Loire-Atlantique département (Retz Country), in few municipalities of the Indre département(around Le Blanc, Bélâbre, Argenton-sur-Creuse), in the far west of the Dordogne département around La Roche-Chalais 19 , and on the limit of the Lot-et-Garonne département next to the Saintongese enclave of Monségur (Monségur, Gironde), in Gironde, as well as in Le Verdon's (Le Verdon-sur-Mer) tip 20 ; all in all, in the old provinces of Poitou, Aunis, Angoumois and Saintonge, in France. 21 The Poitevin-Saintongese language has had an influence in Quebec French, Acadian (Acadian language) and Cajun (Cajun language). Between 1627 and 1663, a few thousand colonists landed in New France, either in Acadia or Canada. The provinces that contributed the most to these migrations were those in the northern and western regions of France. The migrants came from Normandy, Aunis, Perche, Brittany, Paris and Île-de-France (Île-de-France (province)), Poitou, Maine (Maine (province of France)), Saintonge, and Anjou, most of those being regions where French was seldom spoken at the time (see article Languages of France). According to Philippe Barbaud (:fr:Philippe Barbaud) (1984 , the first colonists were therefore mostly non-francophone except for the immigrants from the Paris area, who most likely spoke a popular form of French; and the following ''dialect clash'' (choc des patois (:fr:choc des patois)) brought about the linguistic unification of Quebec. Among the speakers of Norman (Norman language), Picard (Picard language), Aunis, Poitevin (Poitevin (language)), Saintongeais and Breton (Breton language), many might have understood French as a second language. Gradually, a linguistic transfer towards French occurred, leading to the linguistic unification of all the ethnic groups coming from France. ) was a troubadour (fl. (floruit) 1140–1163 Aubrey, 8. Gaunt and Kay, 290. ) of the petty nobility of Saintonge. He was a great influence on the Sicilian School and is quoted in the ''Roman de la Rose''. About fifteen of his poems survive, including one ''planh'' and nine or ten ''cansos (Canso (song))''. The success of anti-tax rebellions in Saintonge and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English; the defences were poorly prepared and most towns attacked by the French surrendered immediately. The western part of the Duchy, the Agenais, was lost in a few weeks. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325. In 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession. He managed to raise an army of mercenaries and capture a number of strongholds in Agenais and Saintonge. However the political climate at home had changed. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his son Edward III (Edward III of England) under the regency of Queen Isabella (Isabella of France) and Roger Mortimer. The regents wanted peace and in the final treaty the loss of Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests abandoned.


century quot

and Aquitaine (also called Guyenne) Capetian France 937 - 1328" Editions Longman page 74: "There was a hiatus between the Carolingian duchy and its successor that was assembled by Count of Poitou in the early tenth century..." as well as of the Counties of Anjou, Poitou, Maine (Maine (province of France)), Touraine, Saintonge, Marche (County of Marche), Périgord, Limousin (Limousin (province)), Nantes


made life

, which made life so intolerable that many fled the country. The Huguenot population of France dropped to 856,000 by the mid-1660s, of which a plurality lived in rural areas. The greatest concentrations of Huguenots at this time resided in the regions of Guienne, Saintonge-Aunis-Angoumois and Poitou.


personal interest

) was a troubadour (fl. (floruit) 1140–1163 Aubrey, 8. Gaunt and Kay, 290. ) of the petty nobility of Saintonge. He was a great influence on the Sicilian School and is quoted in the ''Roman de la Rose''. About fifteen of his poems survive, including one ''planh'' and nine or ten ''cansos (Canso (song))''. The success of anti-tax rebellions in Saintonge and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English; the defences were poorly prepared and most towns attacked by the French surrendered immediately. The western part of the Duchy, the Agenais, was lost in a few weeks. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325. In 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession. He managed to raise an army of mercenaries and capture a number of strongholds in Agenais and Saintonge. However the political climate at home had changed. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his son Edward III (Edward III of England) under the regency of Queen Isabella (Isabella of France) and Roger Mortimer. The regents wanted peace and in the final treaty the loss of Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests abandoned.


modern place

'' (now the town of Angers) was routed entirely to the east of Aunis. The name of this Roman road remains in some modern place names as ) was a troubadour (fl. (floruit) 1140–1163 Aubrey, 8. Gaunt and Kay, 290. ) of the petty nobility of Saintonge. He was a great influence on the Sicilian School and is quoted in the ''Roman de la Rose''. About fifteen of his poems survive, including one ''planh'' and nine or ten ''cansos (Canso (song))''. The success of anti-tax rebellions in Saintonge and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English; the defences were poorly prepared and most towns attacked by the French surrendered immediately. The western part of the Duchy, the Agenais, was lost in a few weeks. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325. In 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession. He managed to raise an army of mercenaries and capture a number of strongholds in Agenais and Saintonge. However the political climate at home had changed. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his son Edward III (Edward III of England) under the regency of Queen Isabella (Isabella of France) and Roger Mortimer. The regents wanted peace and in the final treaty the loss of Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests abandoned.


great influence

"Aubrey8" Aubrey, 8. Gaunt and Kay, 290. ) of the petty nobility of Saintonge. He was a great influence on the Sicilian School and is quoted in the ''Roman de la Rose''. About fifteen of his poems survive, including one ''planh'' and nine or ten ''cansos (Canso (song))''. The success of anti-tax rebellions in Saintonge and Angoumis led to other rebellions in France, including some in which excise officers were lynched. Burg, David F. ''A World History of Tax Rebellions'' (2004) p. 201 Ingham was jailed at Winchester for his involvement in the civil wars of Edward II of England, but was released in 1324 to serve under Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent in the Duchy of Aquitaine during the short War of Saint-Sardos against France. The war was a disaster for the English; the defences were poorly prepared and most towns attacked by the French surrendered immediately. The western part of the Duchy, the Agenais, was lost in a few weeks. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325. In 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession. He managed to raise an army of mercenaries and capture a number of strongholds in Agenais and Saintonge. However the political climate at home had changed. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his son Edward III (Edward III of England) under the regency of Queen Isabella (Isabella of France) and Roger Mortimer. The regents wanted peace and in the final treaty the loss of Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests abandoned.

Saintonge

'''Saintonge''' ( ), historically spelled '''Xaintonge''' and '''Xainctonge''', is a former province of France (Provinces of France) located on the west central Atlantic (Atlantic Ocean) coast. The capital city was Saintes (Saintes, Charente-Maritime) (Xaintes, Xainctes). Other principal towns include Saint-Jean-d'Angély, Jonzac, Frontenay-Rohan-Rohan, Royan, Marennes (Marennes (Charente-Maritime)), Pons (Pons, Charente-Maritime), and Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire. The borders of the province slightly shifted through history, and some mapmakers, such as Nicolas Sanson (1650), Johannes Blaeu (1662), and Bernard Antoine Jaillot (1733), show it extending into Cognac (Cognac, France), traditionally part of Angoumois, and to the parishes of Braud-et-Saint-Louis and Étauliers, part of the Pays Gabay on the right bank of the Gironde River.

Today, lies in Charente, and a small section extends north into Deux-Sèvres, all within the administrative region of Poitou-Charentes.

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