Saint-Marc

What is Saint-Marc known for?


spicy

inside. Like in most places in Haiti, the diet in St. Marc is very starchy; plantains, rice and pasta are present in almost every meal. In St. Marc, seafood is also consumed regularly. For instance, crab, dried cod and fresh fish are available. Goat is perhaps the most common meat, but chicken and beef are also consumed regularly. Haitians have an affinity for either very spicy food (even peanut butter is spicy) or very sweet food (sugar is added to sugary cereals). Spices and spicy peppers

are used abundantly in Haitian cuisine. A significant amount of produce is also grown locally, specifically bananas, plantain (plantain (cooking))s, mangoes, cherries, corn, manioc, rice, and tomatoes. The typical St. Marc resident consumes a lot of fruit. A dish very specific to St. Marc consists of rice with sauce “pois” (beans), crab goat meat mixed in, or both. Other dishes include bananne pesse (fried plaintains) which are accompanied with piklese, a spicy “gardiniera” mixture


food plays

utilizes beats from Haitian folk or popular music. Popular ‘RapKreyol’ artists include BC (Barikad Crew), Skwardy, Izolan, Fantom. and Sebastien Pierre is a popular R&B artist. Food thumb Dous Makos (Haitian Fudge) (File:Dous Makos (Haitian Fudge).jpg) Food plays a large role in the life of people in St. Marc. People are always eating; it is an important part of normal daily social interaction. For the most part, cooking is done outside to avoid overheating and moisture collection


sweet food

inside. Like in most places in Haiti, the diet in St. Marc is very starchy; plantains, rice and pasta are present in almost every meal. In St. Marc, seafood is also consumed regularly. For instance, crab, dried cod and fresh fish are available. Goat is perhaps the most common meat, but chicken and beef are also consumed regularly. Haitians have an affinity for either very spicy food (even peanut butter is spicy) or very sweet food (sugar is added to sugary cereals). Spices and spicy peppers are used abundantly in Haitian cuisine. A significant amount of produce is also grown locally, specifically bananas, plantain (plantain (cooking))s, mangoes, cherries, corn, manioc, rice, and tomatoes. The typical St. Marc resident consumes a lot of fruit. A dish very specific to St. Marc consists of rice with sauce “pois” (beans), crab goat meat mixed in, or both. Other dishes include bananne pesse (fried plaintains) which are accompanied with piklese, a spicy “gardiniera” mixture that consists of carrots, cabbage, and peppers. Soup is typically prepared on Sunday which makes use of all the weeks leftovers. It usually consists of several types of meat, potatoes, and carrots. Fresh fish, typically sole, is also consumed regularly. This fish is cooked over an open fire with a mayonnaise based marinade mixed with various spices. Riz du let is a common dessert. It is essentially a rice pudding made with cinnamon, milk, sugar, and butter. Other desserts include dous makos (Haitian fudge), dous kokoye (homemade coconut candy), pen patat (sweet potato bread), pen diri (rice bread), etc... Religion Religious believers follow mostly Catholicism and Voodou. Both are prevalent throughout the country. Catholicism Christianity is the most widespread and generally accepted religion in St. Marc. Most Haitians attend church on Sundays. Roman Catholicism was the first form of Christianity brought to Haiti and now is the most prevalent Christian denomination with 80% of Haitians practicing. Evangelical, Protestants, and Baptist churches are also very common in St. Marc. The majority of residents are very involved in their church as it helps them maintain their cultural identity. On any given day, groups of people singing hymns can also be heard throughout the streets. Thought to be brought over by African slaves and developed over time, the word Voudou is derived from an African word meaning spirit. It is the most widely practiced religion and is considered the official religion of Haiti. Although a few devout Catholics denounce it, the majority of Haitians practice both religions simultaneously. Because of this Voudou is often resorted to for explaining illness. Voudou is more strongly rooted in the rural areas, and this population is more reluctant to accept Western medicine. Economy Commerce is the largest trade in St. Marc. Many find work as a merchant, either with their own stand in the market or at a boutik “convenient store” stand. There are also a multitude of ambulant sellers who carry baskets of goods or candy on their heads as well as canned milk to passers-by. It is interesting to note there are not many products manufactured in St. Marc. Nearly all products sold are received as donations or surpluses from second-hand stores in the US. St. Marc. markets are open everyday and one can find almost any type of fruit or vegetable grown locally. St. Marc hosts a charcoal market for cooking material. As charcoal is used for much of the cooking in St. Marc and throughout Haiti in general, it is manufactured locally and thus supports a large work force. Aside from the charcoal market, St. Marc’s economics revolve a great deal around agricultural products produced in the area. In Deye Legliz, an area near St. Marc harbor, food markets are open everyday and one can find almost any type of fruit or vegetable grown locally. Most residents frequent the market every Saturday to stock up on food supplies for the week. The Boulevard area houses a large flea market with a variety of mostly second-hand items sold, including clothing, electronic equipment, shoes, toys, bicycles, etc. The marche’s (markets) are open everyday but are typically frequented on Saturdays. Many people from Port-au-Prince come to the markets in St. Marc because of the inexpensive costs. Shopping There are a few different types of stores in St. Marc. These include: Pharmacies that sell medicinal products, open air markets that sell food and many other types of goods, bakeries with wheat and cassava bread and various sweet baked goods, convenience stores, and ''magazins'' or specialty shops for such items as fabric, hardware, beauty salons and car parts. In St. Marc there are also people who carry baskets of goods with them (typically on top of their heads). When driving by, vendors will approach cars for purchases. Demographics According to ARCHIVE Research: In general, people from St. Marc would distinguish between two different classes: a Middle class and a Lower Class (the poverty class). Perhaps the largest distinction between the two is the ability to read write in French. In St. Marc, the more languages spoken, the better the education is acknowledged by others. Many of the better schools teach both French and English. When children finish with these schools, they are fluent in three languages, including Creole. Poorer schools only teach in Creole. With most people living in poverty, everyday becomes a struggle to survive. Individual aspirations are restricted to being able to feed children and send them to school. Long-term planning goals are not on the forefront of the minds of most people living in St. Marc. It is perhaps the goal of many families that their children’s children will be able to live a better life. For people living in the “middle class”, the dream is to one day be able to afford a Concrete Masonry *Unit house. A CMU house is associated with security and wealth. Middle-class families may also wish to save enough money to send themselves and their children out of the country. Since life in St. Marc generally revolves around money, which is placed as a priority above even personal health and individual survival, there is not the same sense of community that people in the developed world might be used to. A desire for the betterment of the city is not typically shared and there is a general lack of patriotism and pride in the larger community. This is perhaps a response to the corrupt political system in which public officials pocket money coming into the community. commons:Category:Saint-Marc, Haiti


cherries

are used abundantly in Haitian cuisine. A significant amount of produce is also grown locally, specifically bananas, plantain (plantain (cooking))s, mangoes, cherries, corn, manioc, rice, and tomatoes. The typical St. Marc resident consumes a lot of fruit. A dish very specific to St. Marc consists of rice with sauce “pois” (beans), crab goat meat mixed in, or both. Other dishes include bananne pesse (fried plaintains) which are accompanied with piklese, a spicy “gardiniera” mixture


agricultural products

. As charcoal is used for much of the cooking in St. Marc and throughout Haiti in general, it is manufactured locally and thus supports a large work force. Aside from the charcoal market, St. Marc’s economics revolve a great deal around agricultural products produced in the area. In Deye Legliz, an area near St. Marc harbor, food markets are open everyday and one can find almost any type of fruit or vegetable grown locally. Most residents frequent the market every Saturday to stock up on food supplies for the week. The Boulevard area houses a large flea market with a variety of mostly second-hand items sold, including clothing, electronic equipment, shoes, toys, bicycles, etc. The marche’s (markets) are open everyday but are typically frequented on Saturdays. Many people from Port-au-Prince come to the markets in St. Marc because of the inexpensive costs. Shopping There are a few different types of stores in St. Marc. These include: Pharmacies that sell medicinal products, open air markets that sell food and many other types of goods, bakeries with wheat and cassava bread and various sweet baked goods, convenience stores, and ''magazins'' or specialty shops for such items as fabric, hardware, beauty salons and car parts. In St. Marc there are also people who carry baskets of goods with them (typically on top of their heads). When driving by, vendors will approach cars for purchases. Demographics According to ARCHIVE Research: In general, people from St. Marc would distinguish between two different classes: a Middle class and a Lower Class (the poverty class). Perhaps the largest distinction between the two is the ability to read write in French. In St. Marc, the more languages spoken, the better the education is acknowledged by others. Many of the better schools teach both French and English. When children finish with these schools, they are fluent in three languages, including Creole. Poorer schools only teach in Creole. With most people living in poverty, everyday becomes a struggle to survive. Individual aspirations are restricted to being able to feed children and send them to school. Long-term planning goals are not on the forefront of the minds of most people living in St. Marc. It is perhaps the goal of many families that their children’s children will be able to live a better life. For people living in the “middle class”, the dream is to one day be able to afford a Concrete Masonry *Unit house. A CMU house is associated with security and wealth. Middle-class families may also wish to save enough money to send themselves and their children out of the country. Since life in St. Marc generally revolves around money, which is placed as a priority above even personal health and individual survival, there is not the same sense of community that people in the developed world might be used to. A desire for the betterment of the city is not typically shared and there is a general lack of patriotism and pride in the larger community. This is perhaps a response to the corrupt political system in which public officials pocket money coming into the community. commons:Category:Saint-Marc, Haiti


rich culture

. These parks are often surrounded by vendors with carts full of goods. Local residents like living in St. Marc because of its rich culture. St. Marc is generally considered a safe place to live by Haitian standards. About 60% live in the communal section, meaning outside of town. This is to say that they have no access to infrastructure, i.e. drainage systems, electricity or potable water. There are many recent developmental projects taking place in St. Marc, however, with assistance


people singing

% of Haitians practicing. Evangelical, Protestants, and Baptist churches are also very common in St. Marc. The majority of residents are very involved in their church as it helps them maintain their cultural identity. On any given day, groups of people singing hymns can also be heard throughout the streets. Thought to be brought over by African slaves and developed over time, the word Voudou is derived from an African word meaning spirit. It is the most widely practiced religion


biography quot

account of Point du Sable as "largely fictitious and wholly unauthenticated". commons:Category:Saint-Marc, Haiti


products open

for the week. The Boulevard area houses a large flea market with a variety of mostly second-hand items sold, including clothing, electronic equipment, shoes, toys, bicycles, etc. The marche’s (markets) are open everyday but are typically frequented on Saturdays. Many people from Port-au-Prince come to the markets in St. Marc because of the inexpensive costs. Shopping There are a few different types of stores in St. Marc. These include: Pharmacies that sell medicinal products, open air


quot biography

account of Point du Sable as "largely fictitious and wholly unauthenticated". A "biography" published in 1953 (see below) helped to popularize the commonly recited claim that he was born in 1745 in Saint-Marc in Saint-Domingue (now Haiti). ref name "

Saint-Marc

'''Saint-Marc''' ( . At the 2003 Census the municipality had 160,181 inhabitants. It is the biggest city between Port-au-Prince and Cap-Haïtien.

The port of Saint-Marc is currently the preferred port of entry for consumer goods coming into Haiti. Reasons for this may include its location away from volatile and congested Port-au-Prince as well as its central location relative to a large group of Haitian cities including Cap-Haïtien, Carrefour (Carrefour, Haiti), Delmas (Delmas, Ouest), Fort-Liberté, Gonaïves, Hinche, Limbe (Limbé, Nord), Pétionville, Port-de-Paix, and Verrettes. These cities, together with their surrounding areas, contain nearly eight million of Haïti's ten million people (2009).

In 1905 the ''Compagnie Nationale'' or ''National Railroad'' built a 100 km railroad north to Saint-Marc from the national capital of Port-au-Prince. The track was later extended another 30 km east to Verrettes.

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