Sable Island

What is Sable Island known for?


nearby unusual

: Photographic Survey of Grey Seal Pups (Feb 2004) Several large bird colonies


significant events

'' are Sable Island and St. Paul Island (St. Paul Island, Nova Scotia); with little or local population, reception (QSL) of these distant points (DXing) is rare, although amateur radio stations do temporarily operate from these islands during shortwave radio contests (DXpedition). CY9 St. Paul Island DXpedition, CY9AA, June 1997 Special prefixes are often issued for stations operating at significant events. In the Western North Atlantic, the grey seal is typically found in large numbers in the coastal waters of Canada and south to about New Jersey in the United States. In Canada, it is typically seen in areas such as the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland (Newfoundland (island)), the Maritimes, and Quebec. The largest colony in the world is at Sable Island, NS (Nova Scotia). In the United States it's found year round off the coast of New England, in particular Maine and Massachusetts, and slightly less frequently in the Middle Atlantic States. Its natural range extends south to Virginia. 1590s *1598 - Following the 1521 landing on Sable Island in southeast of present-day Nova Scotia by the Portuguese, the French establish a settlement. thumb right Grey seal (Image:Grey seal and pup.jpg)s Broadcast 10 October 2001, this programme surveys the effects of the seasons on the world's temperate seas — the most productive on Earth. Sable Island near Nova Scotia boasts the largest colony of grey seal (Grey Seal)s, which breed there when the weather is at its worst. The pups remain marooned for weeks until the spring, when they are strong enough to swim. Spring also heralds the bloom of phytoplankton: it provides food for copepods, and they in turn are prey to jellyfish, which assemble in vast, million-strong swarms. On the Californian coast, giant kelp (Kelp) also flourishes and by summer, grows at the rate of a metre a day. It provides a sanctuary for shoals of fish and sea otters, the latter anchoring themselves to the seaweed when resting and keeping its grazers in check by eating them. Late summer in Alaska sees Pacific salmon (Salmon) heading inshore to breed. However, the level of their favoured river is too low and they are forced to wait in the open sea, where they fall prey to a salmon shark. The early autumn near Vancouver Island, and the temperature drops slowly. There, the last of the year's baby herring become the focus for a feeding frenzy by diving auks and murre (guillemot)s, and marauding rockfish


published early

considerable international following. In non-fiction Shipwreck survivors published early survival narratives about their experiences at Sable Island, beginning with the sinking of the ''Delight'' in 1583. Rainer K. Baehre “The Casting Away of the Delight” in ''Outrageous Seas: Shipwreck and Survival in the Waters off Newfoundland, 1583–1893'' McGill-Queens Press (1999), p. 12 The first formal history of the island, ''Sable Island: its History and Phenomena'', was written


including deep

. These stations maintained, sometimes sporadically in the earliest days, pulling (rowed) lifeboats manned by volunteers and eventually motorized lifeboats. Minister of Fisheries and Oceans One of the first projects Regan undertook as Minister of Fisheries and Oceans was to designate the Sable Gully as a Marine Protected Area. Located offshore of Nova Scotia, near Sable Island, the Gully contains a rich diversity of marine habitats and species, including deep-sea corals and northern


nearby presence

Island's heliport contains emergency aviation fuel for search and rescue helicopters, which use the island to stage further offshore into the Atlantic. Should the need arise, the island serves as an emergency evacuation point for crews aboard nearby drilling rigs of the Sable Offshore Energy Project. The Canadian Forces patrols the area using aircraft and naval vessels, partly due to the nearby presence of natural gas and oil drilling rigs and an undersea pipeline. National Park


performing research

In addition to office and research space, BIO has extensive laboratories, particularly for performing research into aquatic species. Tours of BIO are offered for visitors during the summer months and a popular tour destination are some of the large aquariums and tanks used for research. There are also "touch tanks" in a facility called the Sea Pavilion where visitors are permitted to handle North Atlantic Lobster, Snow Crabs, Rock Crabs, Clams (also known as Pea


studies research

a permanently occupied station on Sable Island because of its unique isolated geographic position down-wind from the North American mainland. In addition to weather studies, research on the island expanded to a range of ecological and wildlife studies due to its unique position in the Atlantic. Sable Island is specifically mentioned in the British North America Act 1867, Part 4, Section 91 as being the special responsibility of the federal government (government of Canada) ("...the exclusive Legislative Authority of the Parliament of Canada extends to ... 9. Beacons, Buoys, Lighthouses, and Sable Island."). For this reason it is considered a separate amateur radio "entity" (equivalent to a country for award credit), and with visiting operations using the special callsign prefix CY0. Out of concern for preserving the island's frail ecology, all visitors to the island, including recreational boaters, require specific permission from Parks Canada. Sable Island's heliport contains emergency aviation fuel for search and rescue helicopters, which use the island to stage further offshore into the Atlantic. Should the need arise, the island serves as an emergency evacuation point for crews aboard nearby drilling rigs of the Sable Offshore Energy Project. The Canadian Forces patrols the area using aircraft and naval vessels, partly due to the nearby presence of natural gas and oil drilling rigs and an undersea pipeline. National Park


fiction book

northeast of Sable Island. The ''Andrea Gail'' sank while returning to Gloucester, its debris washing ashore over the subsequent weeks. The crew of six was presumed killed after a Coast Guard search was unable to find them. The storm and the boat's sinking became the center-piece for Sebastian Junger's best-selling non-fiction book ''The Perfect Storm'' (The Perfect Storm (book)) (1997), which was adapted to a major Hollywood film in 2000 as The Perfect Storm


rich fishing

; Shipwrecks Sable Island is famous for its large number of shipwrecks. An estimated 350 vessels are believed to have fallen victim to the island's sand bars. Thick fogs, treacherous currents, and the island's location in the middle of a major transatlantic shipping route and rich fishing grounds account for the large number of wrecks. The first


natural range

are resident, including the Arctic tern and Ipswich sparrow, a subspecies of the Savannah Sparrow which breeds only on the Island. Many other species are resident, migratory, or transient, blown out to sea in storms and returned to land out of their natural range. It was formerly believed the freshwater sponge ''Heteromeyenia macouni'' was found only in ponds on the island. However, it is now considered to be the same species as ''Racekiela ryderi'', found elsewhere.

Sable Island

'''Sable Island''' (French: ''île de Sable'') is a small island situated in Nova Scotia. The island is also a protected National Park Reserve of Canada (Sable Island National Park Reserve).

thumbnail Nautical Chart, Atlantic Sea Pilot, 1884 (File:IMRAY(1884) p0187 SABLE ISLAND.jpg)

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