Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion

What is Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion known for?


century

or Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church -- rite Latin established 4th century cathedral Cathédrale Notre-Dame du Glarier (Sion Cathedral) cocathedral patron patron_title priests pope

destroyed by Emperor Maximinus (Maximinus II) at the beginning of the 4th century. At first the new diocese was a suffragan of the archdiocese of Vienne; later it became suffragan of Tarentaise. In 589 the bishop, St. Heliodorus, transferred the see to Sion, leaving the low-lying, flood-prone site of Octodurum, where the Drance joins the Rhone (Rhone River). Though frequently the early bishops were also abbots of Saint-Maurice, the monastic community was jealously watchful

-1496) to flee from the diocese. In 1428-1447, the Valais witch trials raged through the area. Sion and the district of the Valais were constantly drawn into wider struggles. Walter II of Supersaxo (1457-1482) had taken part in the battles of the Swiss against Charles the Bold of Burgundy and his ally, the Duke of Savoy, and in 1475 they drove the House of Savoy from Lower Valais. Linked to the Old Swiss Confederacy since the 15th century, the Valais region was for long divided


innovations

Albis in 1531; this victory saved the remaining possessions of the Roman Catholic Church in Switzerland. The abbots of Saint-Maurice opposed all religious innovations as energetically as did Bishops Adrian I of Riedmatten, Hildebrand of Riedmatten (1565-1604), and Adrian II of Riedmatten (1604-1613), so that the whole of Valais remained ostensibly Catholic. Both Adrian II and his successor Hildebrand Jost (1613-1638) were again involved in disputes with the ''sieben Zehnten'' in regard


religious innovations

Albis in 1531; this victory saved the remaining possessions of the Roman Catholic Church in Switzerland. The abbots of Saint-Maurice opposed all religious innovations as energetically as did Bishops Adrian I of Riedmatten, Hildebrand of Riedmatten (1565-1604), and Adrian II of Riedmatten (1604-1613), so that the whole of Valais remained ostensibly Catholic. Both Adrian II and his successor Hildebrand Jost (1613-1638) were again involved in disputes with the ''sieben Zehnten'' in regard


early modern

three of those areas grew into independent municipalities. In 1458, Leuk codified the customary rights of the citizens into law. This "old castle law" was updated in 1563. Medieval and early modern developments In 515 the estate at Sierre was given by the King of Burgundy Sigismund (Sigismund of Burgundy) to the Abbey of Saint-Maurice to hold as a fief. By the 11th century, the fief of Sierre was owned by the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion). The aristocratic families and the residents of the fief lived on the Gerunden, Vieux-Sierre and Plantzette hills. On each of these hills there was a castle that served as the residence for the Bishop's representatives and as a refuge for the population. The castles were razed in the mid-14th century when the noble families stood with the Bishop in his war with the Zenden of the Upper Valais and Counts of Savoy. The demolished castles and villages were abandoned and most residents settled farther north, in plan-Sierre. The only castle that survived the wars of the 14th century was Goubing Castle, southeast of Sierre, which belonged to the lords of Granges.


324

Æthelmær, Bishop of Elmham, was also deposed at the same council. Shortly afterwards Aethelric the Bishop of Selsey, Ethelwin the Bishop of Durham and Leofwin Bishop of Lichfield, who was married, were deposed at a council held at Windsor. Douglas ''William the Conqueror'' p. 324 Barlow ''Feudal Kingdom of England'' p. 93 There were three reasons given for Stigand's deposition: that he


temple complex

sarcophagi were buried on St. Peter's Island (St. Petersinsel) next to a Roman temple complex. A wooden monastery was built over the complex in the 8th-9th century. -valign top Schwery, Henri (Henri Schwery) Bishop emeritus of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion), Switzerland. -valign top thumb left Bertholod tower and surrounding vineyards (File:BertholodTurm.JPG) Lutry was a royal estate


history early

Sion , thumb 400px The Old Swiss Confederacy from 1291 to the sixteenth century (Image:Old Swiss Confederation.jpg) In the Valais, the conflict between the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion) and the Duchy of Savoy, which had led to a separation in 1301 (the bishop controlling the upper Valais and the Savoyards the lower part), broke out again. Twice the Savoyards temporarily occupied the whole Valais, but both times they were ultimately defeated. Both peace treaties from 1361 and 1391 restored the ''status quo'' of 1301. As a result of these struggles, the villages in the upper Valais organized themselves in the ''Sieben Zenden'' ("seven tenths") around 1355, emerging after these wars as largely independent small states, much like the cantons of the ''Eidgenossenschaft''. According to a letter from Eucherius, bishop of Lyon (Eucherius of Lyon) written about 450, bodies identified as the martyrs of Agaunum were discovered and identified by Theodore (Theodulus), the first historically identified Bishop of Octudurum (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion), who was present at the Council of Aquileia, 381 and died in 391. The basilica he built in their honor attracted the pilgrim trade; its remains can still be seen, part of the abbey begun in the early sixth century on land donated by King Sigismund of Burgundy (King of Burgundy). In the early (Early Middle Ages) and High Middle Ages Leuk changed owners repeated until 1138 when it finally came under the authority of the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion). The new rulers encouraged Leuks development by granting concessions. In 1209 Leuk was given the right to have their own weights and measures. In 1285 they built a hospital and in 1310 they added a warehouse one on the old trade route between northern Italy and the markets of Champagne. With the warehouse they established a group of Teamsters that provided extra draft animals to help wagons make it over the mountains. The episcopal fief holders Viztum and Meier built the Bishop's Castle (the seat of Meier) and the Viztumsturm (Viztum's tower). In the 14th Century the castle ruled over three surrounding areas; Loye (Lobio), Tschablen (Cabulo) and Galdinen (Caldana). All three of those areas grew into independent municipalities. In 1458, Leuk codified the customary rights of the citizens into law. This "old castle law" was updated in 1563. Medieval and early modern developments In 515 the estate at Sierre was given by the King of Burgundy Sigismund (Sigismund of Burgundy) to the Abbey of Saint-Maurice to hold as a fief. By the 11th century, the fief of Sierre was owned by the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion). The aristocratic families and the residents of the fief lived on the Gerunden, Vieux-Sierre and Plantzette hills. On each of these hills there was a castle that served as the residence for the Bishop's representatives and as a refuge for the population. The castles were razed in the mid-14th century when the noble families stood with the Bishop in his war with the Zenden of the Upper Valais and Counts of Savoy. The demolished castles and villages were abandoned and most residents settled farther north, in plan-Sierre. The only castle that survived the wars of the 14th century was Goubing Castle, southeast of Sierre, which belonged to the lords of Granges.


quot young

of the canton gave Upper Valais political predominance in the cantonal government, notwithstanding the fact that its population was smaller than that of Lower Valais. This led in 1840 to a civil war with Lower Valais, where the "Young Swiss" party, hostile to the Church, were in control. The party friendly to the Church conquered, it is true, and the influence of the Church over teaching was, at first, preserved, but on account of the defeat of the Sonderbund, with which Valais had


century including

, wooden churches were first built during the Merovingian period. The current churches in Kirchlindach, Oberwil bei Buren and Bleibach were all built above the ruins of these early churches. About 30 churches in the Bern and Solothurn portions of the Aare valley were created over ruins of Roman villas and subsequent burial grounds in the 7th Century (including Meikirch and Oberbipp). In Mett, the church was built over a 5th century mausoleum, which was built over a 4th century tomb. In 700, six sarcophagi were buried on St. Peter's Island (St. Petersinsel) next to a Roman temple complex. A wooden monastery was built over the complex in the 8th-9th century. -valign top Schwery, Henri (Henri Schwery) thumb 400px The Old Swiss Confederacy from 1291 to the sixteenth century (Image:Old Swiss Confederation.jpg) In the Valais, the conflict between the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion) and the Duchy of Savoy, which had led to a separation in 1301 (the bishop controlling the upper Valais and the Savoyards the lower part), broke out again. Twice the Savoyards temporarily occupied the whole Valais, but both times they were ultimately defeated. Both peace treaties from 1361 and 1391 restored the ''status quo'' of 1301. As a result of these struggles, the villages in the upper Valais organized themselves in the ''Sieben Zenden'' ("seven tenths") around 1355, emerging after these wars as largely independent small states, much like the cantons of the ''Eidgenossenschaft''. According to a letter from Eucherius, bishop of Lyon (Eucherius of Lyon) written about 450, bodies identified as the martyrs of Agaunum were discovered and identified by Theodore (Theodulus), the first historically identified Bishop of Octudurum (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion), who was present at the Council of Aquileia, 381 and died in 391. The basilica he built in their honor attracted the pilgrim trade; its remains can still be seen, part of the abbey begun in the early sixth century on land donated by King Sigismund of Burgundy (King of Burgundy). In the early (Early Middle Ages) and High Middle Ages Leuk changed owners repeated until 1138 when it finally came under the authority of the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion). The new rulers encouraged Leuks development by granting concessions. In 1209 Leuk was given the right to have their own weights and measures. In 1285 they built a hospital and in 1310 they added a warehouse one on the old trade route between northern Italy and the markets of Champagne. With the warehouse they established a group of Teamsters that provided extra draft animals to help wagons make it over the mountains. The episcopal fief holders Viztum and Meier built the Bishop's Castle (the seat of Meier) and the Viztumsturm (Viztum's tower). In the 14th Century the castle ruled over three surrounding areas; Loye (Lobio), Tschablen (Cabulo) and Galdinen (Caldana). All three of those areas grew into independent municipalities. In 1458, Leuk codified the customary rights of the citizens into law. This "old castle law" was updated in 1563. Medieval and early modern developments In 515 the estate at Sierre was given by the King of Burgundy Sigismund (Sigismund of Burgundy) to the Abbey of Saint-Maurice to hold as a fief. By the 11th century, the fief of Sierre was owned by the Bishop of Sion (Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion). The aristocratic families and the residents of the fief lived on the Gerunden, Vieux-Sierre and Plantzette hills. On each of these hills there was a castle that served as the residence for the Bishop's representatives and as a refuge for the population. The castles were razed in the mid-14th century when the noble families stood with the Bishop in his war with the Zenden of the Upper Valais and Counts of Savoy. The demolished castles and villages were abandoned and most residents settled farther north, in plan-Sierre. The only castle that survived the wars of the 14th century was Goubing Castle, southeast of Sierre, which belonged to the lords of Granges.


780

that the bishops should not extend their jurisdiction over the abbey. Several of the bishops united both offices: Wilcharius (764-780), previously Archbishop of Vienne, whence he had been driven by the Moors (Al-Andalus); St. Alteus, who received from the pope a bull of exemption in favor of the monastery (780); Aimo II, son of Count Humbert I of Savoy, who entertained Leo IX (Pope Leo IX) at Saint-Maurice in 1049. The prince-bishops About 999, the last king of Upper Burgundy

Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion

native_name ''Fürstbistum Sitten'' (de (German language)) ''Prince-Évêché de Sion'' (fr (French language)) ''Dioecesis Sedunensis'' (la (Latin language))   conventional_long_name Prince-Bishopric of Sion ''or'' Prince-Bishopric of Wallis common_name Sion, Bishopric continent Europe region Alps country Switzerland era Middle Ages status Vassal empire Holy Roman Empire government_type various year_start 999 year_end 1798 life_span 999 – 1798 event_start Bishopric founded date_start before 381 event1 See moved to Sion (Sion, Switzerland) date_event1 589 event2 Bequeathed county of Valais date_event2   around 999 event3 Became associate (Growth of the Old Swiss Confederacy#The Dreizehn Orte) of Old Swiss Confed. (Old Swiss Confederacy) date_event3   March 12, 1529 event4 Became republic (République des Sept Dizains) the Bishop date_event4     1628 event_end Foundation (French Revolutionary Wars: Campaigns of 1798) of Helvetic Republic date_end   April 12, 1798 event_post Entered Swiss Confed. (Switzerland) as canton of Valais date_post   August 4, 1815 p1 Kingdom of Upper Burgundy image_p1 20px Kingdom of Upper Burgundy (File:Blason Bourgogne-comté ancien(aigle).svg) s1 Sieben Zenden flag_s1 Valais-coat of arms old.svg s2 Helvetic Republic flag_s2 Republiquehelv.svg image_flag Flag of the Bishop of Sion.svg image_coat Wappen Bistum Sitten.png image_map Fürstbistum Sitten 1378.jpg image_map_caption Map of Switzerland in 1378, showing the Bishopric labelled ''Valais'' capital Sion (Sion, Switzerland) latd 46 latm 14 latNS N longd 7 longm 22 longEW E national_motto national_anthem ''Notre Valais'' (fr (:fr:Notre Valais), de (:de:Walliserhymne)) common_languages French (French language), Walser German religion Roman Catholic (Roman Catholicism) currency title_leader Bishop leader1 St Theodore of Octodurus year_leader1 before 381–391 title_representative Prince-Bishop representative1 Hugo, Count of Valais (first Prince-Bishop) year_representative1 998–1017 representative2 Hildebrand II Jost (last ''de facto'' Prince-Bishop) year_representative2 1613–38 representative3 Joseph-Antoine Blatter (last ''de jure'' Prince-Bishop) year_representative3 1790–1807 footnotes

The '''Diocese of Sion''' ( ) is a Roman Catholic (Roman Catholic Church) ecclesiastical territory in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. It is the oldest bishopric in the country and one of the oldest north of the Alps. The history of the Bishops of Sion, of the '''Abbey of St. Maurice''' of Valais as a whole are inextricably intertwined.

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