Resettlement Administration

What is Resettlement Administration known for?


work young

film) The River about the importance of Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. The National Park Service began purchasing the land surrounding Singletary Lake in 1936 for a recreational demonstration project (Recreational Demonstration Area). Out of work young men were employed by the Civilian Conservation Corps, which


leadership program

and withdrawn boy gravitated to the ukulele, becoming adept at entertaining his classmates with it, while laying the basis for his subsequent remarkable audience rapport. At thirteen Seeger entered prep school at the Avon Old Farms boarding school in Connecticut, where he was selected to attend Camp Rising Sun, the Louis August Jonas Foundation's international summer leadership program. During the summer of 1936, while traveling with his father and stepmother, Pete heard the five-string banjo for the first time at the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival (Bascom Lamar Lunsford#The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival) in western North Carolina near Asheville (Asheville, North Carolina), organized by local folklorist, lecturer, and traditional music performer Bascom Lamar Lunsford, whom Charles Seeger had hired for Farm Resettlement (Resettlement Administration) music projects. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 48-49. The festival took place in a covered baseball field. There the Seegers watched square-dance teams from Bear Wallow, Happy Hollow, Cane Creek, Spooks Branch, Cheoah Valley, Bull Creek, and Soco Gap; heard the five-string banjo player Samantha Bumgarner; and family string bands, including a group of Indians from the Cherokee reservation who played string instruments and sang ballads. They wandered among the crowds who camped out at the edge of the field, hearing music being make there as well. As Lunsford’s daughter would later recall, those country people "held the riches that Dad had discovered. They could sing, fiddle, pick the banjos, and guitars with traditional grace and style found nowhere else but deep in the mountains. I can still hear those haunting melodies drift over the ball park." Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. For the Seegers, experiencing the beauty of this music firsthand was a "conversion experience". Pete was deeply affected and, after learning basic strokes from Lunsford, spent much of the next four years trying to master the five-string banjo. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. The teenage Seeger also sometimes accompanied his parents to regular Saturday evening gatherings in at the Greenwich Village loft of painter and art teacher Thomas Hart Benton and his wife Rita. Benton, a lover of Americana, played "Cindy" (Cindy (folk song)) and "Old Joe Clark" with his students Charlie (Charles Pollock) and Jackson Pollock; friends from the "hillbilly" (Old-time music) recording industry; as well as avant-garde (avant-garde music) composers Carl Ruggles and Henry Cowell. It was at one of Benton's parties that Pete heard "John Henry (John Henry (folklore)# music)" for the first time. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 235. According to John Szwed, Jackson Pollock, later famous for his "drip" paintings, played harmonica, having smashed his violin in frustration, see: ''Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World'' (Viking, 2010), p. 88. With the onset of the Great Depression, Lange turned her camera lens from the studio to the street. Her studies of unemployed and homeless people captured the attention of local photographers and led to her employment with the federal Resettlement Administration (RA), later called the Farm Security Administration (FSA). His first film commission was ''The Plow That Broke the Plains'', sponsored by the United States Resettlement Administration, which also sponsored the film ''The River (The River (1938 film))'' with music by Thomson. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1949 with his film score for ''Louisiana Story''. In 1935, Evans spent two months at first on a fixed-term photographic campaign for the Resettlement Administration (RA) in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. From October on, he continued to do photographic work for the RA and later the Farm Security Administration (FSA), primarily in the Southern United States. In 1994, The Estate of Walker Evans handed over its holdings to New York City's The Metropolitan Museum of Art. ''Wired'' Magazine. "Is It Art, or Memorex?" by Reena Jana. March 21, 2001. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the sole copyright holder for all works of art in all media by Walker Evans. The only exception is a group of approximately 1,000 negatives in collection of the Library of Congress which were produced for the Resettlement Administration (RA) Farm Security Administration (FSA). Evans's RA FSA works are in the public domain. Masters of Photography website: Walker Evans page Second New Deal The Second New Deal (1935–36) was the second stage of the New Deal programs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced his main goals in January 1935: improved use of national resources, security against old age, unemployment and illness, and slum clearance, as well as a national welfare program (the WPA) to replace state relief efforts. The most important programs included Social Security (Social Security (United States)), the National Labor Relations Act ("Wagner Act"), the Banking Act, rural electrification (Rural Electrification Act), and breaking up utility holding companies (Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935). Programs that were later ended by the Supreme Court or the Conservative Coalition included the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the National Youth Administration (NYA), the Resettlement Administration, and programs for retail price control, farm rescues (Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act), coal stabilization, and taxes on the rich (Revenue Act of 1935) and the Undistributed profits tax. Liberals in Congress passed the Bonus Bill (Adjusted Compensation Payment Act) for World War veterans over FDR's veto. The family (Seeger#Seeger family), including Mike Seeger, Peggy Seeger, Barbara, Penny, and stepson Pete Seeger, moved to Washington D.C. in 1936 after Charles’ appointment to the music division of the Resettlement Administration. While in Washington D.C. Crawford Seeger worked closely with John (John Lomax) and Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress to preserve and teach American folk music. Her arrangements and interpretations of American Traditional folk songs are among the most respected including transcriptions for: American Folk Songs for Children, Animal Folksongs for Children (1950) and American Folk Songs for Christmas (1953) Our Singing Country and Folk Song USA by John and Alan Lomax. However she is most well known for Our Singing Country (1941.) She also composed Rissolty Rossolty, an ‘American Fantasia for Orchestra’ based on folk tunes, for the CBS radio series American School of the Air. Moss studied at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., where was editor of ''The George Washington Law Review'' (1936–1937). consists of bottomland and upland forest. A variety of species inhabit these lands including quail, deer, and turkey. Between 1933 and 1937 the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program, where rural farmers were supposed to be relocated to more fertile areas. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown (Batestown, Prince William County, Virginia) and condemned another 48, to form the Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area. National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents. Batestown and Hickory Ridge (Hickory Ridge, Virginia) both suffered the same fate. Between 1933 and 1937, the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program to form Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area , where rural farmers were supposed to relocate for more fertile land. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown and condemned another 48, to form a new recreation area. However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents.


national natural

. At the end of the bridge are a large boulder with a bench below it to the left, a trail sign labeled "Waters Meet" and "The Falls Trail" above a map of the trail in the center, and a natural stone monument with a metal plaque to the right. Bridge at Waters Meet, with the National Natural Landmark plaque on the rock at right In 1913, Ricketts opened the glens and their waterfalls to the public, charging $1 for parking. Although this fee was unpopular, it remained


social research

violin and Charles composition at the New York Institute of Musical Art (later Juilliard (Juilliard School)), whose president, family friend Frank Damrosch, was Constance's adoptive "uncle". Charles also taught part time at the New School for Social Research. Career and money tensions led to quarrels and reconciliations, but when Charles discovered Constance had opened a secret bank account in her own name, they separated, and Charles took custody of their three sons. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', p. 32. Frank Damrosch, siding with Constance, fired Charles from Juilliard, see Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger: a Composer's Search for American Music'' (Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 224–25. Beginning in 1936, Charles held various administrative positions in the federal government's Farm Resettlement program (Resettlement Administration), the WPA (Works Projects Administration)'s Federal Music Project (1938–1940), and the wartime Pan American Union. After World War II, he taught ethnomusicology at the University of California and Yale University. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 22, 24. Winkler (2009), p. 4. Early work At four, Seeger was sent away to boarding school, but came home two years later, when his parents learned the school had failed to inform them he had contracted scarlet fever. Wilkinson, "The Protest Singer" (2006) p. 50 and Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', p. 32. He attended first and second grades in Nyack, New York, where his mother lived, before entering boarding school in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Alec Wilkinson, ''The Protest Singer: An Intimate Portrait of Pete Seeger'' (New York: Knopf, 2009), p. 43. Despite being classical musicians, his parents did not press him to play an instrument. On his own, the otherwise bookish and withdrawn boy gravitated to the ukulele, becoming adept at entertaining his classmates with it, while laying the basis for his subsequent remarkable audience rapport. At thirteen Seeger entered prep school at the Avon Old Farms boarding school in Connecticut, where he was selected to attend Camp Rising Sun, the Louis August Jonas Foundation's international summer leadership program. During the summer of 1936, while traveling with his father and stepmother, Pete heard the five-string banjo for the first time at the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival (Bascom Lamar Lunsford#The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival) in western North Carolina near Asheville (Asheville, North Carolina), organized by local folklorist, lecturer, and traditional music performer Bascom Lamar Lunsford, whom Charles Seeger had hired for Farm Resettlement (Resettlement Administration) music projects. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 48-49. The festival took place in a covered baseball field. There the Seegers watched square-dance teams from Bear Wallow, Happy Hollow, Cane Creek, Spooks Branch, Cheoah Valley, Bull Creek, and Soco Gap; heard the five-string banjo player Samantha Bumgarner; and family string bands, including a group of Indians from the Cherokee reservation who played string instruments and sang ballads. They wandered among the crowds who camped out at the edge of the field, hearing music being make there as well. As Lunsford’s daughter would later recall, those country people "held the riches that Dad had discovered. They could sing, fiddle, pick the banjos, and guitars with traditional grace and style found nowhere else but deep in the mountains. I can still hear those haunting melodies drift over the ball park." Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. For the Seegers, experiencing the beauty of this music firsthand was a "conversion experience". Pete was deeply affected and, after learning basic strokes from Lunsford, spent much of the next four years trying to master the five-string banjo. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. The teenage Seeger also sometimes accompanied his parents to regular Saturday evening gatherings in at the Greenwich Village loft of painter and art teacher Thomas Hart Benton and his wife Rita. Benton, a lover of Americana, played "Cindy" (Cindy (folk song)) and "Old Joe Clark" with his students Charlie (Charles Pollock) and Jackson Pollock; friends from the "hillbilly" (Old-time music) recording industry; as well as avant-garde (avant-garde music) composers Carl Ruggles and Henry Cowell. It was at one of Benton's parties that Pete heard "John Henry (John Henry (folklore)# music)" for the first time. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 235. According to John Szwed, Jackson Pollock, later famous for his "drip" paintings, played harmonica, having smashed his violin in frustration, see: ''Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World'' (Viking, 2010), p. 88. With the onset of the Great Depression, Lange turned her camera lens from the studio to the street. Her studies of unemployed and homeless people captured the attention of local photographers and led to her employment with the federal Resettlement Administration (RA), later called the Farm Security Administration (FSA). His first film commission was ''The Plow That Broke the Plains'', sponsored by the United States Resettlement Administration, which also sponsored the film ''The River (The River (1938 film))'' with music by Thomson. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1949 with his film score for ''Louisiana Story''. In 1935, Evans spent two months at first on a fixed-term photographic campaign for the Resettlement Administration (RA) in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. From October on, he continued to do photographic work for the RA and later the Farm Security Administration (FSA), primarily in the Southern United States. In 1994, The Estate of Walker Evans handed over its holdings to New York City's The Metropolitan Museum of Art. ''Wired'' Magazine. "Is It Art, or Memorex?" by Reena Jana. March 21, 2001. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the sole copyright holder for all works of art in all media by Walker Evans. The only exception is a group of approximately 1,000 negatives in collection of the Library of Congress which were produced for the Resettlement Administration (RA) Farm Security Administration (FSA). Evans's RA FSA works are in the public domain. Masters of Photography website: Walker Evans page Second New Deal The Second New Deal (1935–36) was the second stage of the New Deal programs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced his main goals in January 1935: improved use of national resources, security against old age, unemployment and illness, and slum clearance, as well as a national welfare program (the WPA) to replace state relief efforts. The most important programs included Social Security (Social Security (United States)), the National Labor Relations Act ("Wagner Act"), the Banking Act, rural electrification (Rural Electrification Act), and breaking up utility holding companies (Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935). Programs that were later ended by the Supreme Court or the Conservative Coalition included the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the National Youth Administration (NYA), the Resettlement Administration, and programs for retail price control, farm rescues (Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act), coal stabilization, and taxes on the rich (Revenue Act of 1935) and the Undistributed profits tax. Liberals in Congress passed the Bonus Bill (Adjusted Compensation Payment Act) for World War veterans over FDR's veto. The family (Seeger#Seeger family), including Mike Seeger, Peggy Seeger, Barbara, Penny, and stepson Pete Seeger, moved to Washington D.C. in 1936 after Charles’ appointment to the music division of the Resettlement Administration. While in Washington D.C. Crawford Seeger worked closely with John (John Lomax) and Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress to preserve and teach American folk music. Her arrangements and interpretations of American Traditional folk songs are among the most respected including transcriptions for: American Folk Songs for Children, Animal Folksongs for Children (1950) and American Folk Songs for Christmas (1953) Our Singing Country and Folk Song USA by John and Alan Lomax. However she is most well known for Our Singing Country (1941.) She also composed Rissolty Rossolty, an ‘American Fantasia for Orchestra’ based on folk tunes, for the CBS radio series American School of the Air. Moss studied at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., where was editor of ''The George Washington Law Review'' (1936–1937). consists of bottomland and upland forest. A variety of species inhabit these lands including quail, deer, and turkey. Between 1933 and 1937 the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program, where rural farmers were supposed to be relocated to more fertile areas. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown (Batestown, Prince William County, Virginia) and condemned another 48, to form the Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area. National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents. Batestown and Hickory Ridge (Hickory Ridge, Virginia) both suffered the same fate. Between 1933 and 1937, the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program to form Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area , where rural farmers were supposed to relocate for more fertile land. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown and condemned another 48, to form a new recreation area. However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents.


early work

), and the wartime Pan American Union. After World War II, he taught ethnomusicology at the University of California and Yale University. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 22, 24. Winkler (2009), p. 4. Early work At four, Seeger was sent away to boarding school, but came home two years later, when his parents learned the school had failed to inform them he had contracted scarlet fever. Wilkinson, "


criticism

and other amenities, but the 75,000 people who had the benefit of these camps were a small share of those in need and could only stay temporarily. After facing enormous criticism for his poor management of the RA, Tugwell resigned in 1936. On January 1, 1937, Records of the Farmers Home Administration with hopes of making the RA

'', a 1940 film adaptation (The Grapes of Wrath (film)) directed by John Ford, a Tony Award-winning play (The Grapes of Wrath (play)) and an opera (The Grapes of Wrath (opera)). Superseded by Farm Security Administration In the face of Congressional criticism, in September 1937 it was folded into a new body, the Farm Security Administration (FSA), which operated until 1946. Communities and greenbelt cities The RA worked with nearly 200

government (Resettlement Administration) to raise awareness about the New Deal and was intended to cost $6,000 or less; it eventually cost over $19,000 and Lorentz, turning in many receipts written on various scraps of paper, had many of his reimbursements denied and paid for much of the film himself. Lorentz later faced criticism for appearing to blame westward bound settlers for the ecological crisis by having eroded the soil of the Plains with unrestrained farming (and one of his


building quot

Perkins asked for additional (if minor) design changes. "Miss Perkins Asks Change in Labor Building." ''Washington Post.'' April 16, 1934. Pressing needs for office space meant that a portion of the ICC building was occupied before the structure was finished. "U.S. Triangle Buildings To Be Up Within Year." ''Washington Post.'' November 7, 1934. Minor alterations were made to the Labor building

, and the Soil Erosion Service (Natural Resources Conservation Service) of the Department of the Interior. See: "I.C.C. to Share Its Building." ''Washington Post.'' May 26, 1934. Meanwhile, construction forged ahead on the Archives building. Already considered too small to hold all the materials in its possession, a proposal had been made to add another story to the building. "Archives Building Addition Dropped." ''Washington Post

Portraying Nation's Birth Shown." ''New York Times.'' November 15, 1936; "Novel Safeguards Given to Archives." ''New York Times.'' September 4, 1938; National Records and Archives Administration. "History of the National Archives Building." Archives.gov. No date. Accessed 2009-11-25. Records were not transferred in large numbers to the building until April 1937. "Records Go to New Archives." ''New York Times.'' April 18, 1937. He graduated from Harvard University in 1908, then studied in Cologne, Germany and conducted with the Cologne Opera. Capaldi, Jim, "Folk Scene: Charles Seeger" obituary April 1979 He left Europe to take a position as Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley, where he taught from 1912 to 1916 before being dismissed for his public opposition to U.S. entry into World War I. His brother Alan Seeger was killed in action on July 4, 1916, while serving as a member of the French Foreign Legion. Charles Seeger then took a position at Juilliard before teaching at the Institute of Musical Art in New York from 1921 to 1933 and the New School for Social Research from 1931 to 1935. In 1936, he was in Washington, DC, working as a technical advisor to the Music Unit of the Special Skills Division of the Resettlement Administration (later renamed the Farm Security Administration). Stone, Peter, ''Sidney and Henry Cowell,'' Association for Cultural Equity From 1957 to 1961, he taught at the University of California Los Angeles. From 1961 to 1971 he was a research professor at the Institute of Ethnomusicology at UCLA. In 1949-50 he was Visiting Professor of the Theory of Music in the School of Music (Yale School of Music) at Yale University. From 1935 to 1953 he held positions in the federal government's Resettlement Administration, Works Projects Administration (WPA), and Pan American Union, including serving as an administrator for the WPA's Federal Music Project, for which his wife also worked, from 1938 to 1940. He graduated from Harvard University in 1908, then studied in Cologne, Germany and conducted with the Cologne Opera. Capaldi, Jim, "Folk Scene: Charles Seeger" obituary April 1979 He left Europe to take a position as Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley, where he taught from 1912 to 1916 before being dismissed for his public opposition to U.S. entry into World War I. His brother Alan Seeger was killed in action on July 4, 1916, while serving as a member of the French Foreign Legion. Charles Seeger then took a position at Juilliard before teaching at the Institute of Musical Art in New York from 1921 to 1933 and the New School for Social Research from 1931 to 1935. In 1936, he was in Washington, DC, working as a technical advisor to the Music Unit of the Special Skills Division of the Resettlement Administration (later renamed the Farm Security Administration). Stone, Peter, ''Sidney and Henry Cowell,'' Association for Cultural Equity From 1957 to 1961, he taught at the University of California Los Angeles. From 1961 to 1971 he was a research professor at the Institute of Ethnomusicology at UCLA. In 1949-50 he was Visiting Professor of the Theory of Music in the School of Music (Yale School of Music) at Yale University. From 1935 to 1953 he held positions in the federal government's Resettlement Administration, Works Projects Administration (WPA), and Pan American Union, including serving as an administrator for the WPA's Federal Music Project, for which his wife also worked, from 1938 to 1940. *''Mato Grosso: the Great Brazilian Wilderness'' (1931) likely the first sync sound documentary made in the field, in Mato Grosso, Brazil. *''The Plow that Broke the Plains'' (1936), a New Deal Resettlement Administration documentary directed by Pare Lorentz. *''Traffic with the Devil'' (1946), a documentary short nominated for an Academy Award. url http: xroads.virginia.edu ~1930s FILM lorentz bio.html accessdate May 22, 2011 Despite not having any film credits, Lorentz was appointed to the Resettlement Administration as a film consultant. He was given US$6,000 to make a film, which became ''The Plow That Broke the Plains'', a film that showed the natural and man-made devastation caused by the Dust Bowl. Though the tight budget and his inexperience occasionally showed through in the film, Lorentz's script, combined with Thomas Chalmers's (Thomas Hardie Chalmers) narration and Virgil Thomson's (Virgil Thomson) score, made the 30-minute movie powerful and moving. The film, which had its first public showing on May 10, 1936 at Washington's Mayflower Hotel, had a preview screening in March at the White House. consists of bottomland and upland forest. A variety of species inhabit these lands including quail, deer, and turkey. Between 1933 and 1937 the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program, where rural farmers were supposed to be relocated to more fertile areas. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown (Batestown, Prince William County, Virginia) and condemned another 48, to form the Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area. National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents. Batestown and Hickory Ridge (Hickory Ridge, Virginia) both suffered the same fate. Between 1933 and 1937, the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program to form Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area , where rural farmers were supposed to relocate for more fertile land. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown and condemned another 48, to form a new recreation area. However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents.


successful campaign

*Benjamin Stoddert: First United States Secretary of the Navy (attended but did not earn a degree) *Rexford Tugwell: Head of the Resettlement Administration and part of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" *Michael G. Vickers: United States Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict - Central Intelligence Agency's principal strategist in paramilitary operation to drive the Soviets out of Afghanistan (Soviet invasion of Afghanistan). Cumberland Mountain State Park began as part of the greater Cumberland Homesteads Project, a New Deal-era initiative by the Resettlement Administration that helped relocate poverty-stricken families on the Cumberland Plateau to small farms centered around what is now the Cumberland Homestead community. The families of Homestead built the park with help from the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration. In 1911, he returned to the United States to become the professor of Rural Institutions, University of California, and chairman of the California Land Settlement Board. His ideas about developing efficient rural communities would later influence what would become the Resettlement Administration communities of the New Deal. The Resettlement Administration reports of the 1930s emphasized the isolation of the community, describing the unreliable ferry that approached from the east and the muddy road that entered from the west. The community had received public assistance from the Red Cross in 1932 and federal and state aid in 1933 and 1934. Beginning in 1935, the Resettlement Administration made agricultural loans and offered farm and home management advice. In 1937, the average rural rehabilitation loan to Gee's Bend families was $353.41, and the agency reports speak of possible cooperative undertakings; a building campaign for houses, barns, a schoolhouse, and a sawmill. Residents were


film

'', a 1940 film adaptation (The Grapes of Wrath (film)) directed by John Ford, a Tony Award-winning play (The Grapes of Wrath (play)) and an opera (The Grapes of Wrath (opera)). Superseded by Farm Security Administration In the face of Congressional criticism, in September 1937 it was folded into a new body, the Farm Security Administration (FSA), which operated until 1946. Communities and greenbelt cities The RA worked with nearly 200

in Webster Parish (Webster Parish, Louisiana), Louisiana * Greenbrook, New Jersey (planned by the RA but never built) Photography, film, and folk song projects The RA also funded projects recording aspects of its work and context, including: * The Photography Project, which documented the rural poverty of the Great Depression and produced thousands of images that are now stored and available at the Library of Congress, was headed up by Roy Stryker. * The Film Project, which produced

two documentaries directed by Pare Lorentz and scored by Virgil Thomson, The Plow That Broke the Plains and The River (The River (1938 film)); * Sidney Robertson Cowell's recordings of folk songs, conducted during the summer of 1937, sponsored by the RA's Special Skills Division, and now stored at the University of Wisconsin. See also * Farm Security Administration * Dust Bowl References * Meriam; Lewis. ''Relief and Social Security


working people

'', p. 26). Charles and Constance moved back east, making Charles' parents' estate in Patterson, New York, northeast of New York City, their base of operations. When baby Pete was eighteen months old, they set out with him and his two older brothers in a home-made trailer, on a quixotic mission to bring musical uplift to the working people in the American South. Ann Pescatello, ''Charles Seeger: A Life In Music'', 83–85. On their return, Constance taught violin and Charles composition at the New York Institute of Musical Art (later Juilliard (Juilliard School)), whose president, family friend Frank Damrosch, was Constance's adoptive "uncle". Charles also taught part time at the New School for Social Research. Career and money tensions led to quarrels and reconciliations, but when Charles discovered Constance had opened a secret bank account in her own name, they separated, and Charles took custody of their three sons. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', p. 32. Frank Damrosch, siding with Constance, fired Charles from Juilliard, see Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger: a Composer's Search for American Music'' (Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 224–25. Beginning in 1936, Charles held various administrative positions in the federal government's Farm Resettlement program (Resettlement Administration), the WPA (Works Projects Administration)'s Federal Music Project (1938–1940), and the wartime Pan American Union. After World War II, he taught ethnomusicology at the University of California and Yale University. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 22, 24. Winkler (2009), p. 4. Early work At four, Seeger was sent away to boarding school, but came home two years later, when his parents learned the school had failed to inform them he had contracted scarlet fever. Wilkinson, "The Protest Singer" (2006) p. 50 and Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', p. 32. He attended first and second grades in Nyack, New York, where his mother lived, before entering boarding school in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Alec Wilkinson, ''The Protest Singer: An Intimate Portrait of Pete Seeger'' (New York: Knopf, 2009), p. 43. Despite being classical musicians, his parents did not press him to play an instrument. On his own, the otherwise bookish and withdrawn boy gravitated to the ukulele, becoming adept at entertaining his classmates with it, while laying the basis for his subsequent remarkable audience rapport. At thirteen Seeger entered prep school at the Avon Old Farms boarding school in Connecticut, where he was selected to attend Camp Rising Sun, the Louis August Jonas Foundation's international summer leadership program. During the summer of 1936, while traveling with his father and stepmother, Pete heard the five-string banjo for the first time at the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival (Bascom Lamar Lunsford#The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival) in western North Carolina near Asheville (Asheville, North Carolina), organized by local folklorist, lecturer, and traditional music performer Bascom Lamar Lunsford, whom Charles Seeger had hired for Farm Resettlement (Resettlement Administration) music projects. Dunaway, ''How Can I Keep From Singing'', pp. 48-49. The festival took place in a covered baseball field. There the Seegers watched square-dance teams from Bear Wallow, Happy Hollow, Cane Creek, Spooks Branch, Cheoah Valley, Bull Creek, and Soco Gap; heard the five-string banjo player Samantha Bumgarner; and family string bands, including a group of Indians from the Cherokee reservation who played string instruments and sang ballads. They wandered among the crowds who camped out at the edge of the field, hearing music being make there as well. As Lunsford’s daughter would later recall, those country people "held the riches that Dad had discovered. They could sing, fiddle, pick the banjos, and guitars with traditional grace and style found nowhere else but deep in the mountains. I can still hear those haunting melodies drift over the ball park." Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. For the Seegers, experiencing the beauty of this music firsthand was a "conversion experience". Pete was deeply affected and, after learning basic strokes from Lunsford, spent much of the next four years trying to master the five-string banjo. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 239. The teenage Seeger also sometimes accompanied his parents to regular Saturday evening gatherings in at the Greenwich Village loft of painter and art teacher Thomas Hart Benton and his wife Rita. Benton, a lover of Americana, played "Cindy" (Cindy (folk song)) and "Old Joe Clark" with his students Charlie (Charles Pollock) and Jackson Pollock; friends from the "hillbilly" (Old-time music) recording industry; as well as avant-garde (avant-garde music) composers Carl Ruggles and Henry Cowell. It was at one of Benton's parties that Pete heard "John Henry (John Henry (folklore)# music)" for the first time. Judith Tick, ''Ruth Crawford Seeger'', p. 235. According to John Szwed, Jackson Pollock, later famous for his "drip" paintings, played harmonica, having smashed his violin in frustration, see: ''Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World'' (Viking, 2010), p. 88. With the onset of the Great Depression, Lange turned her camera lens from the studio to the street. Her studies of unemployed and homeless people captured the attention of local photographers and led to her employment with the federal Resettlement Administration (RA), later called the Farm Security Administration (FSA). His first film commission was ''The Plow That Broke the Plains'', sponsored by the United States Resettlement Administration, which also sponsored the film ''The River (The River (1938 film))'' with music by Thomson. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1949 with his film score for ''Louisiana Story''. In 1935, Evans spent two months at first on a fixed-term photographic campaign for the Resettlement Administration (RA) in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. From October on, he continued to do photographic work for the RA and later the Farm Security Administration (FSA), primarily in the Southern United States. In 1994, The Estate of Walker Evans handed over its holdings to New York City's The Metropolitan Museum of Art. ''Wired'' Magazine. "Is It Art, or Memorex?" by Reena Jana. March 21, 2001. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the sole copyright holder for all works of art in all media by Walker Evans. The only exception is a group of approximately 1,000 negatives in collection of the Library of Congress which were produced for the Resettlement Administration (RA) Farm Security Administration (FSA). Evans's RA FSA works are in the public domain. Masters of Photography website: Walker Evans page Second New Deal The Second New Deal (1935–36) was the second stage of the New Deal programs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced his main goals in January 1935: improved use of national resources, security against old age, unemployment and illness, and slum clearance, as well as a national welfare program (the WPA) to replace state relief efforts. The most important programs included Social Security (Social Security (United States)), the National Labor Relations Act ("Wagner Act"), the Banking Act, rural electrification (Rural Electrification Act), and breaking up utility holding companies (Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935). Programs that were later ended by the Supreme Court or the Conservative Coalition included the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the National Youth Administration (NYA), the Resettlement Administration, and programs for retail price control, farm rescues (Frazier–Lemke Farm Bankruptcy Act), coal stabilization, and taxes on the rich (Revenue Act of 1935) and the Undistributed profits tax. Liberals in Congress passed the Bonus Bill (Adjusted Compensation Payment Act) for World War veterans over FDR's veto. The family (Seeger#Seeger family), including Mike Seeger, Peggy Seeger, Barbara, Penny, and stepson Pete Seeger, moved to Washington D.C. in 1936 after Charles’ appointment to the music division of the Resettlement Administration. While in Washington D.C. Crawford Seeger worked closely with John (John Lomax) and Alan Lomax at the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress to preserve and teach American folk music. Her arrangements and interpretations of American Traditional folk songs are among the most respected including transcriptions for: American Folk Songs for Children, Animal Folksongs for Children (1950) and American Folk Songs for Christmas (1953) Our Singing Country and Folk Song USA by John and Alan Lomax. However she is most well known for Our Singing Country (1941.) She also composed Rissolty Rossolty, an ‘American Fantasia for Orchestra’ based on folk tunes, for the CBS radio series American School of the Air. Moss studied at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., where was editor of ''The George Washington Law Review'' (1936–1937). consists of bottomland and upland forest. A variety of species inhabit these lands including quail, deer, and turkey. Between 1933 and 1937 the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program, where rural farmers were supposed to be relocated to more fertile areas. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown (Batestown, Prince William County, Virginia) and condemned another 48, to form the Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area. National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents. Batestown and Hickory Ridge (Hickory Ridge, Virginia) both suffered the same fate. Between 1933 and 1937, the Federal Government began implementing a Resettlement Administration program to form Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area National Park Service - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area , where rural farmers were supposed to relocate for more fertile land. The RA bought 79 pieces of property in both Hickory Ridge and Batestown and condemned another 48, to form a new recreation area. However, the RA often made no effort to actually resettle the displaced residents.

Resettlement Administration

The '''Resettlement Administration''' ('''RA''') was a New Deal U.S. federal agency (List of United States federal agencies) that, between April 1935 and December 1936, relocated struggling urban and rural families to communities planned by the federal government.

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