Republic of the Congo

What is Republic of the Congo known for?


fine sense

the aboriginal Marquesas (Marquesas Islands) carver appreciates the way in which plain surfaces contrast and emphasize decorated parts, and judiciously restricts his skill to bands of decoration or to special points. The Ijos (Ijaw people) of the lower Niger (Niger Delta) design their paddles in a masterly way, and show a fine sense of proportion between the plain and the decorated surface. Their designs, though slightly in relief, are of the chip nature. The method of decorating a subject


controversial book

'', another controversial book, on the supposed ties between Bernard Kouchner - currently French foreign minister - and African dictators. Péan claimed two consultancies run by associates of Kouchner were paid nearly $6m (£4.1m; €4.7m) by the governments of Gabon and Congo (Republic of the Congo) for reports that were written by him. According to Péan, some of this money was paid by the two African governments after Kouchner became foreign minister in May 2007. Kouchner denied the accusations of conflict of interest, blaming the allegations on "circles" who hated him and pointing to differences with Péan over who should be blamed for the Rwandan genocide.


called progressive

"for questioning" as much as they did his boss, Aguiyi-Ironsi. Fajuyi was seen as a so-called progressive, who had supported the Nzeogwu coup in January of that year. The bullet-riddled bodies of Aguiyi-Ironsi and Fajuyi were later found in a nearby forest, and Yakubu Gowon became the new military head of state. A year later, in 1967, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel at the start of the campaign towards Enugu, which was captured later in that year.


important leadership

, Gabon espouses development by evolution rather than revolution and favors regulated free enterprise as the system most likely to promote rapid economic growth. Gabon played an important leadership role in the stability of Central Africa through involvement in mediation efforts in Chad, the Central African Republic, Angola, the Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (D.R.C.), and Burundi. In December 1999, through the mediation efforts of President Bongo, a peace accord was signed in the Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville) between the government and most leaders of an armed rebellion. President Bongo was also involved in the continuing D.R.C. peace process, and played a role in mediating the crisis in Côte d'Ivoire. Gabonese armed forces were also an integral part of the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CEMAC) mission to the Central African Republic. Gabon is a member of the United Nations (UN) and some of its specialized and related agencies, as well as of the World Bank; the IMF; the African Union (AU); the Central African Customs Union Central African Economic and Monetary Community (UDEAC CEMAC); EU ACP association under the Lome Convention; the Communaute Financiere Africaine (CFA); the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC); the Nonaligned Movement; and the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS CEEAC), among others. In 1995, Gabon withdrew from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Gabon was elected to a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council for January 2010 through December 2011 and held the rotating presidency in March 2010. Borders Gabon has a total of 2,551 km of international boundaries. It borders Equatorial Guinea (350 km) and Cameroon (298 km) to the north and the Republic of the Congo (1,903 km) to the west and south. Gabon lies on the equator. ; Maritime claims: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, Cameroon, Canada, People's Republic of China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Ireland (Republic of Ireland), Italy, Japan, South Korea, Liberia, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, People's Republic of China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Ireland (Republic of Ireland), Italy, Japan, South Korea, Liberia, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela Interlingua has active speakers on all continents, especially in South America and in Eastern (Eastern Europe) and Northern Europe, most notably Scandinavia; also in Russia and Ukraine. In Africa, Interlingua has official representation in the Republic of the Congo


previous games

Cholmondely , who claims to have found a source of unlimited energy. Throughout the game George meets many other characters, including: Nico (Nico Collard) (voiced by Sarah Crook), a reporter and George’s girlfriend from previous games; Bruno Ostvalt (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Bruno Ostvalt), a former member of the Neo-Templars from the first game (Broken Sword: The Shadow of the Templars); the Grand Master (List of Broken Sword: The Shadow of the Templars characters#The Grand Master) of the Neo-Templars; Vernon Blier (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Vernon Blier), a hacker from Paris; Beatrice (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Beatrice), Vernon's girlfriend; Colonel Butley (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Colonel Butley), a former British colonel; Melissa Butley (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Melissa Butley), daughter of Colonel Butley; Petra (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Petra), a female assassin; Susarro (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Susarro), the head of The Dragon Cult; Flobbage (List of Broken Sword: The Shadow of the Templars characters#Flobbage) and Flap (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Flap), a road-worker and a gangster, who both first appeared in ''The Shadow of the Templars''; Madame Zazi (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Madame Zazi), a fortune-teller from Glastonbury; Tristram Hillage (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Tristram Hillage), a hippie poet and owner of the Cosmic Faerie at Glastonbury; and Eamon O'Mara (List of Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon characters#Eamon O'Mara), an Irish BBC personality who is proud of his heritage. The game starts off in the Congo (Republic of the Congo). Later in the game, many other countries are also visited, including France, England and Egypt.


technical knowledge

as a whole models the French system. The educational infrastructure has been seriously degraded as a result of political and economic crises. There are no seats in most classrooms, forcing children to sit on the floor. Enterprising individuals have set up private schools, but they often lack the technical knowledge and familiarity with the national curriculum to teach effectively. Families frequently enroll their children in private schools only to find they cannot make the payments.


small role

. There are copious Interlingua web pages, including editions of Wikipedia and Wiktionary, and a number of periodicals, including ''Panorama in Interlingua'' from the Union Mundial pro Interlingua (UMI) and magazines


high oil

, economic progress was badly hurt by slumping oil prices and the resumption of armed conflict in December 1998, which worsened the republic's budget deficit. The current administration presides over an uneasy internal peace and faces difficult economic problems of stimulating recovery and reducing poverty, despite record-high oil prices since 2003. Natural gas and diamonds are also recent major Congolese exports, although Congo was excluded from the Kimberley Process in 2004 amid allegations


team early

got the idea to create the Pan-Armenian Games. In protest at a tour of South Africa by the All Blacks team early in the year, Congo (Republic of the Congo)'s official Jean Claude Ganga led a boycott of 28 African nations as the IOC refused to bar the New Zealand team. http: www.nzhistory.net.nz media photo montreal-olympics-boycott Some of the nations (including Morocco, Cameroon and Egypt) had already participated however, as the teams only withdrew after the first day. From Southern and Central Africa, only Senegal and Ivory Coast took part. Both Iraq and Guyana also opted to join the Congolese-led boycott. ''For the full list of boycotting countries, see 1976 Summer Olympics#Boycotting countries'' AFRICA: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, DRC (Democratic Republic of the Congo), Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Western Sahara, Zambia, Zimbabwe.


international religious

: www.state.gov g drl rls irf 2009 127348.htm title Iraq: International Religious Freedom Report author United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor publisher U.S. State Department accessdate 2010-04-20 date October 26, 2009 and Indonesia (especially but not exclusively 1962-2000

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor publisher U.S. State Department accessdate 2007-03-03 date 2001-10-26 ). During the late 1970s, the Bahá'í Faith was also

Republic of the Congo

The '''Republic of the Congo''' ( ), also known as '''Congo Republic''' http: topics.nytimes.com top news international countriesandterritories congo New York Times or '''Congo-Brazzaville''', is a country (Sovereign state) located in Central Africa. It is bordered by Gabon, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda (Cabinda Province).

The region was dominated by Bantu (Bantu peoples)-speaking tribes, who built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French (France) colony of Equatorial Africa (French Equatorial Africa). Upon independence in 1960, the former colony of French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People's Republic of the Congo was a Marxist–Leninist single-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multi-party elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War.

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