Reichsarbeitsdienst

What is Reichsarbeitsdienst known for?


military service

Category:Government of Nazi Germany Category:Labor history Category:1934 establishments in Germany Category:German words and phrases Category:Economy of Nazi Germany ''''Day 2''' ' : The second day begins with a montage (Montage sequence) of the attendees getting ready for the opening of the Reich Party Congress, and then footage of the top Nazi officials arriving at the Luitpold Arena (Nazi_party_rally_grounds#Luitpoldarena). The film then cuts to the opening ceremony, where Rudolf Hess announces the start of the Congress. The camera then introduces much of the Nazi hierarchy and covers their opening speeches, including Joseph Goebbels, Alfred Rosenberg, Hans Frank, Fritz Todt, Robert Ley, and Julius Streicher. Then the film cuts to an outdoor rally for the ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' (Labor Service), which is primarily a series of pseudo-military drills by men carrying spades. This is also where Hitler gives his first speech on the merits of the Labor Service and praising them for their work in rebuilding Germany. The day then ends with a torchlight SA (Sturmabteilung) parade in which Viktor Lutze speaks to the crowds. *Schönheit der Arbeit (SdA; Beauty of Work) – Aimed to make workplaces more enticing to workers (e.g. renovations of outdated factories, new canteens for workers, smoking-free rooms, cleaner working spaces etc.). *Reichsarbeitsdienst (RAD; Reich Labour Service) – Solution to the unemployment crisis the Nazis inherited. Provided cheap labour for big state projects, such as the Autobahns. Made compulsory for unemployed men 16-25 in 1935. Provided work security to many unemployed. After finishing high school, Morath passed the ''Abitur'' and was obliged to complete six months of service for the ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' (Reich Labour Service) before entering Berlin University. At university, Morath studied languages. She became fluent in French, English, and Romanian (Romanian language) in addition to her native German (to these she later added Spanish, Russian and Chinese). "I studied where I could find a quiet space, in the University and the Underground stations that served as air-raid shelters. I did not join the ''Studentenschaft'' (Student Organization)." Morath, Inge. ''I Trust My Eyes (Manuscript for Berlin Lecture)'', page 9. Unpublished: date unknown. Inge Morath Foundation. Toward the end of World War II, Morath was drafted for factory service in Tempelhof, alongside Ukrainian (Ukrainians) prisoners of war. During an attack on the factory by Russian bombers, she fled on foot to Austria. In later years, Morath refused to photograph war, preferring to work on stories that showed its consequences. Early life and career Michael Wittmann was born on April 22, 1914 in the village of Vogelthal in the Oberpfalz region of Bavaria. He was the second son of local farmer Johann Wittmann and his wife Ursula. In February 1934, Michael joined the Volunteer Labour Service, the FAD (what later became the RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst)) and on October 30, 1934 he joined the German Army. He was assigned to the 19. Infantry Regiment based at Freising by Munich, eventually reaching the rank of Gefreiter (lance-corporal). In October 1936 the 22-year-old Wittmann joined the Allgemeine-SS. On April 5, 1937, he was assigned to the premier regiment, later division Leibstandarte-SS ''Adolf Hitler'' (Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler) (LSSAH) and was given the rank SS-Mann (Mann (military rank)) (private). A year later, he participated in the occupation of Austria (Anschluss) and the Sudetenland with an armoured car platoon. thumb left Rudolf Heß (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-B01718, Ausstellung "Planung und Aufbau im Osten".jpg), Heinrich Himmler, Philipp Bouhler, Reich Minister Todt and Reinhard Heydrich (from left) at a ''Generalplan Ost'' exhibition, 1941 In 1938, he founded the ''Organisation Todt'' (OT), joining together government firms, private companies and the ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' (Reich Labor Service), for the construction of the "West Wall", later renamed the "Siegfried Line", for the defence of the ''Reich'' territory. On 17 March 1940, he was appointed ''Reichsminister für Bewaffnung und Munition'' ("Reich Minister for Armaments and Munitions") and oversaw the work of ''Organisation Todt'' in the occupied west. After the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, he was appointed to manage the restoration of the infrastructure there. At the beginning of world war II, the Reichsarbeitsdienst became compulsory also for young women. It lasted half a year. Many young women became 'Blitzmädel' (Wehrmachthelferin) during world war II

the end of World War II and was also a member of the Prussian (Free State of Prussia (1933–1947)) government under Minister President Hermann Göring as State Labour Minister. Military service After his ''Abitur'' (equivalent to high level High School diploma), he was called into the Reich Labour Service (''Reichsarbeitsdienst'') and then into the Wehrmacht (German Army during the Nazi era). In 1938, he took part in the annexation of Austria (Anschluss) and eventually

in the Wehrmacht invasion of Czechoslovakia. The rest of the war Between 21 March and 26 September 1942, Seel was forced to join the RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst) to receive some military training. First, he was sent to Vienna as an aide-de-camp to a German officer. Then, it was a military airport in Gütersloh near the Dutch-German border. Stahlschmidt completed his ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' in Eichelsachsen near Gleiwitz. Afterwards he joined the military service


writing songs

, Ratzinger served at various posts around the city with his unit. They were never sent to the front. Biography Born in Amberg, Bavaria, in 1914 into a military family, Baumann was a German nationalist and a devout Catholic, belonging to the Catholic nationalist organization "New Germany". He started writing songs and poems when he was still an adolescent (e.g. "Macht keinen Lärm", 1933). In 1934 he was noticed by the Hitler Youth


film quot'

of the Reichsarbeitsdienst before finally being conscripted into the Navy (Kriegsmarine). He was captured by the British in early 1945 and held as a POW (Prisoner of war). Goals of the Nazi film policy Goebbels, who appointed himself "Patron of the German film", assumed, accurately, that a national cinema which was entertaining and put glamour on the government would be a more effective propaganda instrument than a national cinema in which


stint

a kindergarten teacher at the Fröbel (Friedrich Fröbel) Institute in Ulm-Söflingen. She had also chosen this kindergarten job hoping that it would be recognized as an alternate service to ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' (National Labor Service), a prerequisite to be admitted to the University. This was not the case, though, and in spring 1941 she began a six month stint in the auxiliary war service as a nursery teacher in Blumberg. The military-like regimen of the Labor Service caused her to think very


feature films

. There are very few examples of German feature films from the Third Reich that deal with the NSDAP or with party organizations such as the Sturmabteilung, Hitler Youth or the National Labour Service (Reichsarbeitsdienst). The propaganda films that refer directly to Nazi politics amounted to less than a sixth of the whole national film production, which mainly consisted of light entertainment films. After his ''Abitur,'' the German equivalent of Baccalauréat, in 1937, Willi Graf did his six-month ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' and afterwards began his medical studies. In 1938, he was arrested along with other members of the ''Grauer Orden'' and charged by a court in Mannheim with illegal youth league activities–the ''Bünde'' having been banned–in relation with his unlawful field trips, camping excursions and other meetings with the ''Grauer Orden''. The charges were later dismissed as part of a general amnesty declared to celebrate the Anschluss. The detention had lasted three weeks. His time in jail did not weaken his resolve to participate in anti-Nazi activities or organizations. Leipelt was born in Vienna. His father was a graduate in civil engineering, and his mother a chemist from a Christian (Christianity) family with Jewish roots. In 1925, the family moved to Hamburg, where Hans did his ''Abitur'' in 1938, and then reported to the ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' and the Wehrmacht. He was decorated with the Iron Cross second class and the Tank Destruction Badge in June 1940 during the French campaign (Battle of France). He was dishonourably released from duty because he was a Mischling first grade. On 27 April 1933 Seldte finally joined the Nazi Party and integrated the ''Stahlhelm'' members into Ernst Röhm's ''Sturmabteilung (SA)'' militia. In August 1933, he was awarded the rank of ''SA-Obergruppenführer'' and later was appointed Reichskommissar for the ''Freiwilliger Arbeitsdienst'' employment program, but was soon superseded by his state secretary Konstantin Hierl as leader of the ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' organization. In March 1934 Seldte was made the leader of the German League of Front Fighters, a successor organization of the ''Stahlhem'', which however was soon disbanded. In 1935 he requested to be released from official responsibilities, but Hitler refused. Seldte, without substantial power, remained Reich Minister for Labour until the end of World War II and was also a member of the Prussian (Free State of Prussia (1933–1947)) government under Minister President Hermann Göring as State Labour Minister. Military service After his ''Abitur'' (equivalent to high level High School diploma), he was called into the Reich Labour Service (''Reichsarbeitsdienst'') and then into the Wehrmacht (German Army during the Nazi era). In 1938, he took part in the annexation of Austria (Anschluss) and eventually in the Wehrmacht invasion of Czechoslovakia. The rest of the war Between 21 March and 26 September 1942, Seel was forced to join the RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst) to receive some military training. First, he was sent to Vienna as an aide-de-camp to a German officer. Then, it was a military airport in Gütersloh near the Dutch-German border. Stahlschmidt completed his ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' in Eichelsachsen near Gleiwitz. Afterwards he joined the military service in Salzwedel and became a professional soldier. In Salzwedel he completed his military basic training as a fighter pilot. He continued his training at the pilot training facilities in Breslau and Wien-Schwechat. From here he was posted to Jagdgeschwader 27. Wolfram Aichele’s parents were deeply hostile to the Nazis. Many of their interests, including freemasonry and the philosophy of Rudolf Steiner, conflicted with the politics of Nazism. Wolfram’s father, the artist Erwin Aichele, managed to avoid joining the Nazi Party. But he could do nothing to prevent his son being drafted into the Reichsarbeitsdienst or Reich Labour Service in 1942, the first inevitable step into the Wehrmacht. From Easter 1924 until Easter 1928, Lent attended the local public primary school (Volksschule) at Pyrehne. His father and oldest brother Werner then tutored him at home in preparation for the entrance examination at the public secondary school (Gymnasium (school)) at Landsberg. In February 1933, Helmut joined the ''Jungvolk'', the junior branch of the Hitler Youth (Hitler Jugend). From March 1933, he acted as a youth platoon leader, or ''Jungzugführer'' (1 March 1933 – 1 April 1935) and flag-bearer, or ''Fähnleinführer'' (1 April 1935 – 9 November 1935) until he left the ''Jungvolk'' to prepare for his ''diploma (Abitur)'' examination. Hinchliffe 2003, pp. 8–11. Helmut passed his graduation examinations at the age of seventeen on 12 December 1935. On 2 February 1936, he began the eight-week compulsory National Labor Service (Reichsarbeitsdienst) (Reichsarbeitsdienst) at Mohrin. Hinchliffe 2003, pp.5–12. He joined the military service in the ''Luftwaffe'' as a ''Fahnenjunker'' on 1 April 1936, against the wishes of his father. Fraschka 1994, p. 186. Trapped in the pocket were the 12th (12th Infantry Division (Germany)), 30th, 32nd (32nd Infantry Division (Germany)), 123rd and 290th infantry divisions, as well as the SS-Division ''Totenkopf'' (SS Division Totenkopf). There were also RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst), Police (Ordnungspolizei), Todt (Organisation Todt) organization and other auxiliary units who were trapped and assisted in the battle. In total, about 90,000 German troops and around 10,000 auxiliaries were trapped inside the pocket. Their commander was ''General der Infanterie'' Walter Graf von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt (Walter von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt), commander of the IInd Army Corps. As the military industry changed into higher gear before World War II several workers camps were set up in Schönkirchen for the various defence companies such as Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft, Feinmechanische Werke and other military suppliers. At the beginning these camps were inhabited by Reichsarbeitsdienst members but after the start of World War II increasingly foreign workers (Forced labor in Germany during World War II) (''Fremdarbeiter'') were placed in there. To defend nearby Kiel and its military industry some anti-aircraft units (Anti-aircraft warfare) were installed on the municipal territory. Nonetheless several airstrikes caused heavy civilian collateral damage in Schönkirchen, too.


military

''') was a major organisation established by Nazi Germany as an agency to help mitigate the effects of mass unemployment on German economy (Economy of Nazi Germany), militarise the workforce and indoctrinate it with Nazi (Nazism) ideology. From June 1935 onwards, men aged between 18 and 24 had to serve six months before their military service. During World War II compulsory service also included young women and the RAD developed to an auxiliary formation which provided support

cgi content abstract 38 2 221 "Labour Services in the Weimar Republic and their Ideological Godparents" , ''Journal of Contemporary History'', 2003; 38: 221-236 with Hierl as appointed ''Reichsarbeitsführer'' (Reich Labour Leader) according to the ''Führerprinzip''. With massive financial support by the German government, RAD members were to provide service for mainly military and to a lesser extent civic and agricultural construction projects. Organization

by an ''Arbeitsgauführer'' officer with headquarters staff and a ''Wachkompanie'' (Guard Company). Under each district were between six and eight ''Arbeitsgruppen'' (Work Groups), battalion-sized formations of 1200–1800 men. These groups were divided into six company (company (military unit))-sized RAD-Abteilung units. Conscripted personnel had to move into labour barracks. Each rank and file RAD man was supplied with a spade and a bicycle. A paramilitary uniform was implemented in 1934


Graf

-Division ''Totenkopf'' , as well as RAD (Reichsarbeitsdienst), Police (Ordnungspolizei), Todt (Organisation Todt) organization and other auxiliary units, for a total of about 90,000 German troops and around 10,000 auxiliaries. Their commander was ''General der Infanterie'' Walter Graf von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt (Walter von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt), commander of the IInd Army Corps. Life and career During World War II, Alexander was a teenaged Luftwaffenhelfer and member

, Willi Graf did his six-month ''Reichsarbeitsdienst'' and afterwards began his medical studies. In 1938, he was arrested along with other members of the ''Grauer Orden'' and charged by a court in Mannheim with illegal youth league activities–the ''Bünde'' having been banned–in relation with his unlawful field trips, camping excursions and other meetings with the ''Grauer Orden''. The charges were later dismissed as part of a general amnesty declared to celebrate the Anschluss

in the battle. In total, about 90,000 German troops and around 10,000 auxiliaries were trapped inside the pocket. Their commander was ''General der Infanterie'' Walter Graf von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt (Walter von Brockdorff-Ahlefeldt), commander of the IInd Army Corps. As the military industry changed into higher gear before World War II several workers camps were set up in Schönkirchen for the various defence companies such as Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft, Feinmechanische Werke and other


work setting

Hungary was occupied by the Red Army Ratzinger was put to work setting up anti-tank defences in preparation for the expected Red Army offensive. On 20 November 1944, his unit was released from service. Ratzinger again returned home. After three weeks passed, he was drafted into the German army (Heer (1935-1945)) at Munich and assigned to the infantry barracks in the center of Traunstein, the city near which his family lived. After basic infantry training


school team

Raithel'' and or ''Kampfgruppe Semmering'', though the late-war documentation is weak. Its elements surrendered to the Soviets (Red Army) at the end of the war. Due to his father's relocation, Nowotny transferred to the secondary school (''Oberschule'') in Laa an der Thaya, where he received his diploma (''Abitur'') in May 1938. In his teens, Nowotny was interested in all kinds of sports. In 1935, he played football (Association football) for the school team in Waidhofen


work amp

where Hitler gives his first speech on the merits of the Labor Service and praising them for their work in rebuilding Germany. The day then ends with a torchlight SA (Sturmabteilung) parade in which Viktor Lutze speaks to the crowds. *Schönheit der Arbeit (SdA; Beauty of Work) – Aimed to make workplaces more enticing to workers (e.g. renovations of outdated factories, new canteens for workers, smoking-free rooms, cleaner working spaces etc.). *Reichsarbeitsdienst (RAD

Reichsarbeitsdienst

The '''Reichsarbeitsdienst''' (translated to ''Reich (German Reich) Labour Service'', abbreviated '''RAD''') was a major organisation established by Nazi Germany as an agency to help mitigate the effects of mass unemployment on German economy (Economy of Nazi Germany), militarise the workforce and indoctrinate it with Nazi (Nazism) ideology.

From June 1935 onwards, men aged between 18 and 24 had to serve six months before their military service. During World War II compulsory service also included young women and the RAD developed to an auxiliary formation which provided support for the Wehrmacht armed forces.

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