Province of Posen

What is Province of Posen known for?


efforts active

existentialism, made him a famous proponent for the Jewish people and their faith. During World War I, Baeck was an army chaplain in the German Imperial Army. Bertha Hirsch Baruch was born in the Province of Posen (Province of Posen), Germany. She came to New London, Connecticut with her father in 1876. She wrote poetry in her teens and was encouraged by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop in her literary efforts. Active in College Settlement and Univ. Ext. work, she attended


title stories'

of Danzig . The Polish paper Wprost used both "Drang nach Osten" and "Drang nach Westen" in August 2002 to title stories about German RWE company taking over Polish STOEN and Polish migration into eastern Germany, respectively. Paul Reuber, Anke Strüver, Günter Wolkersdorfer, ''Politische Geographien Europas - Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt: Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt'', 2005, ISBN 3825865231, 9783825865238 From 1921


time life

Posen , was a German (Germany) philosopher, psychologist, and a vocal opponent of the anti-Semitism of his time. Life and education He was born at Filehne, Posen (Province of Posen) (now Wieleń). The son of Aaron Levin Lazarus, a pupil of Akiba Eiger, and himself president of the ''bet din'' and the ''yeshiva'' of Filehne (died there in 1874), he was educated in Hebrew literature and history, and subsequently in law and philosophy


poetry published

) gymnasia '' in Inowrocław, Poznań, Opole, Racibórz, and in 1884 graduated from Mary Magdalen Gymnasium in Poznań. He studied philosophy and literature in German universities in Leipzig and Wrocław. During his studies he began having articles and poetry published, working with various Polish magazines. For his activities in socialist circles he was twice arrested by Prussian police and spent half a year in prison. in extent, ceded by the Kingdom of Saxony, with the addition of some districts already belonging to Prussia, the most important of which are the Altmark, from which the State of Prussia sprang; the former immediate principalities of the Archbishop of Magdeburg and of the Bishop of Halberstadt, which Prussia had received by the Peace of Westphalia (1648) at the close of the Thirty Years' War; and the Eichsfeld, with the city of Erfurt and its surroundings. Up to 1802 the Eichsfeld and Erfurt had belonged to the principality of the Archbishop of Mainz; a large of the population had, therefore, retained the Catholic Faith during the Reformation. As regards ecclesiastical affairs the Province of Saxony had been assigned to the Diocese of Paderborn by the papal bull ''De salute animarum'' of 16 July 1821. The province contained three ecclesiastical administrative divisions: the episcopal commissariat of Magdeburg that embraced the entire governmental department of Magdeburg and consisted of four deaneries and 25 parishes; the "ecclesiastical Court" of Erfurt, which included the governmental Department of Merseburg and the eastern half of the governmental Department of Erfurt; and consisted of 2 deaneries (Halle and Erfurt) and 28 parishes; the episcopal commissariat of Heiligenstadt, which embraceed the western half of the governmental department of Erfurt, that is called the Upper Eichsfeld, and consisted of 16 deaneries and 129 parishes. :::As to voivod(e)ship, I believe it's harmless and has the merit of being used almost universally as the English equivalent of Polish ''województwo''. Contrary to ''province'', which in Poland is used to refer to quite a different type of administrative unit (Province of Posen, for instance), it is 100% unambigous. The case of powiat is a tad more complex as there is no universally accepted version and, as our chat at WikiProject Geography of Poland has shown, we could as well use the terms of ''district'', ''county'', ''prefecture'' and perhaps even more. I believe the historical arguments for using ''powiat'' instead of ''county'' (''hrabstwo'' in Polish) are quite serious and we could go either way here. However, lately we (me and Balcer) finally settled the problem of double naming by moving all of the ''county'' articles to ''powiat of XXX'' scheme and fixing the List of Polish powiats page. The solution is far from perfect, but it's at least consistent. Halibu (User:Halibutt)tt (User talk:Halibutt) 15:07, 24 November 2005 (UTC) Huth was born in Krotoszyn (Krotoschin) in the Province of Posen, Prussia (Kingdom of Prussia). In 1885 he entered the University of Berlin, and he graduated at the University of Leipzig (Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)) in 1889. In 1891 he established himself at Berlin University as lecturer in Central Asiatic languages and in Buddhism. In 1897 he undertook a journey to Siberia for the purpose of studying Tungusic (Tungusic languages), receiving a subvention from the Imperial Academy of Sciences of St. Petersburg (Russian Academy of Sciences). He went to eastern Turkestan with the Turpan expedition of the Königliches Museum für Völkerkunde of Berlin, in 1902, and spent the following year in western Turkestan studying Turkish (Turkish language) dialects and folklore. Witold Dzierżykraj-Morawski was born in 1895 in his family's manor in Oporów near Krummensee (Krzemieniewo), Province of Posen, German Empire. At the age of 15 he inherited the manor and the surrounding village . As a German (Germany) citizen, after the outbreak of the Great War (World War I) he was drafted into the Imperial German army. Promoted to officer's grade, in December 1918 he joined the newly-reborn Polish Army. A field commander during the Greater Poland Uprising (Greater Poland Uprising (1918–1919)), during the Polish-Bolshevik War he became the chief of staff of the Polish 7th Cavalry Brigade.


educational social

) in Poznań, where he participated actively in a secret Polish educational-social youth movement, and later studied at academies in Tetschen (Děčín) (Děčín), Bohemia, and Leipzig, Saxony (Kingdom of Saxony). '''Robert Remak''' (26 July 1815 – 29 August 1865) was a Polish (Poland) German (Germany) embryologist, physiologist, and neurologist, born in Posen, Prussia (Province of Posen). Dr. Remak obtained his medical degree from Friedrich


literary efforts

existentialism, made him a famous proponent for the Jewish people and their faith. During World War I, Baeck was an army chaplain in the German Imperial Army. Bertha Hirsch Baruch was born in the Province of Posen (Province of Posen), Germany. She came to New London, Connecticut with her father in 1876. She wrote poetry in her teens and was encouraged by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop in her literary efforts. Active in College Settlement and Univ. Ext. work, she attended Pennsylvania University and Yale (Yale University). She was on the editorial staff for the ''Los Angeles Times''. In 1906 she lived at 1168 W. 36th St., Los Angeles, California. Youth Wilamowitz-Moellendorff was born in Markowitz (Markowice) (Markowice, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship), a small village near Hohensalza (Inowrocław) (Inowrocław), in the then Province of Posen (at present part of the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship), to a Germanized (Germanization) family of distant Polish (Poles) ancestry. His father, a Prussian Junker, was Arnold Wilamowitz, of Szlachta origin and using the Ogończyk Coat of Arms, while his mother was Ulrika, née Calbo. The couple settled in a small manor confiscated from a local noble in 1836. The Prussian part of their name, von Moellendorf, was acquired in 1813, when Prussian field marshal Wichard Joachim Heinrich von Möllendorf adopted Ulrich's ancestors. Wilamowitz, a third child, grew up in East Prussia. In 1793, due to the second partition of Poland, Trzemeszno became a part of Prussia and after Napoleon I, in 1815 it was incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Posen. In 1849, Trzemeszno was renamed "Tremessen" and belonged to Kreis Mogilno of the Prussian Province of Posen. It was registered within Standesamt Tremessen. Early years Reinefarth was born in Gnesen (Gniezno) (Gniezno), Province of Posen. After finishing the gymnasium (gymnasium (school)) in 1922, he joined the law faculty of the university of Jena. He graduated in 1927 and passed the 1st degree state exams. Until 1930 he completed his application (Application for employment) at the local court in Jena and was promoted to judge. On August 1, 1932, he joined the NSDAP and received a relatively low number of party id card (#1,268,933). In December of the same year he joined the SS. History The first German licence plates that had a lettering plan were issued from 1906 onwards. Berlin for example was using I A (I for Prussia), Munich II A (II for Bavaria), Stuttgart III A (III for Württemberg (Free People's State of Württemberg)). Other German states used further Roman numbers such as IV (Baden (Republic of Baden)), V (Hesse (People's State of Hesse)), and VI (Alsace-Lorraine; now France). Many states used prefixes derived from the state names, such as B (Brunswick (Free State of Brunswick)), HB (Bremen), HH (Hamburg), and HL (Lübeck (Free City of Lübeck)), the latter three used again for the same entities since 1956. Other bigger cities: IV B Baden (Heidelberg, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Freiburg, Lake Constance), II N Cities of Nuremberg and Fürth. The Prussian provinces had the following prefixes: I E Province of Brandenburg (to a minor part now Poland), I C Province of East Prussia (now divided between Lithuania, Poland and Russia), I S Province of Hannover, I T Province of Hesse-Nassau (Today Frankfurt, State of Hessen and neighboring counties), I L Province of Hohenzollern, I Z Rhine Province (Cologne, Düsseldorf and other large cities in the Ruhr Area), I H Province of Pomerania (now prevailingly Poland), I Y Province of Posen (now Poland), I B Province of Posen-West Prussia (now Poland), I M Province of Saxony, I P Province of Schleswig-Holstein, I K Province of Silesia (now mostly Poland), I X Province of Westphalia, and finally I D Province of West Prussia (now Poland). Hausser was born in Brandenburg an der Havel to a Prussian military (Prussian Army) family; his father Kurt Hausser was a major in the Imperial German Army (German Army (German Empire)). Paul entered the army in 1892 and from then until 1896 was at the cadet school in Köslin, and from 1896 he attended the cadet academy Berlin-Lichterfelde where he successfully graduated in 1899. On March 20, 1899 he was commissioned as a lieutenant and assigned to Infantry-Regiment 155 stationed at Ostrowo in Posen (Province of Posen); on October 1, 1903 he became the adjutant of the regiment’s 2nd battalion and he served in this capacity for five years, until October 1, 1908. Noted for his military gifts, he attended the Prussian Military Academy in Berlin from October 1908 until his graduation on July 21, 1911. From 1912, onwards, including the First World War, Hausser served in a number of General Staff assignments, including the greatly reduced postwar German army (''Reichswehr''), in which by 1927 he had become a colonel. Life Kalischer was born in Lissa (Leszno) (Leszno) in the Prussian Province of Posen. Destined for the rabbinate, he received his Talmudic education from Jacob of Lissa and Rabbi Akiva Eiger of Posen. After his marriage he left Lissa and settled in Toruń, where he spent the rest of his life. Here he took an active interest in the affairs of the Jewish community, and for more than forty years held the office of ''Rabbinatsverweser'' ("acting rabbi"). Disinterestedness was a prominent feature of his character; he refused to accept any remuneration for his services. His wife, by means of a small business, provided their meager subsistence. He has been described as "the real founder of modern Zionism" 1 . birth_date in extent, ceded by the Kingdom of Saxony, with the addition of some districts already belonging to Prussia, the most important of which are the Altmark, from which the State of Prussia sprang; the former immediate principalities of the Archbishop of Magdeburg and of the Bishop of Halberstadt, which Prussia had received by the Peace of Westphalia (1648) at the close of the Thirty Years' War; and the Eichsfeld, with the city of Erfurt and its surroundings. Up to 1802 the Eichsfeld and Erfurt had belonged to the principality of the Archbishop of Mainz; a large of the population had, therefore, retained the Catholic Faith during the Reformation. As regards ecclesiastical affairs the Province of Saxony had been assigned to the Diocese of Paderborn by the papal bull ''De salute animarum'' of 16 July 1821. The province contained three ecclesiastical administrative divisions: the episcopal commissariat of Magdeburg that embraced the entire governmental department of Magdeburg and consisted of four deaneries and 25 parishes; the "ecclesiastical Court" of Erfurt, which included the governmental Department of Merseburg and the eastern half of the governmental Department of Erfurt; and consisted of 2 deaneries (Halle and Erfurt) and 28 parishes; the episcopal commissariat of Heiligenstadt, which embraceed the western half of the governmental department of Erfurt, that is called the Upper Eichsfeld, and consisted of 16 deaneries and 129 parishes. :::As to voivod(e)ship, I believe it's harmless and has the merit of being used almost universally as the English equivalent of Polish ''województwo''. Contrary to ''province'', which in Poland is used to refer to quite a different type of administrative unit (Province of Posen, for instance), it is 100% unambigous. The case of powiat is a tad more complex as there is no universally accepted version and, as our chat at WikiProject Geography of Poland has shown, we could as well use the terms of ''district'', ''county'', ''prefecture'' and perhaps even more. I believe the historical arguments for using ''powiat'' instead of ''county'' (''hrabstwo'' in Polish) are quite serious and we could go either way here. However, lately we (me and Balcer) finally settled the problem of double naming by moving all of the ''county'' articles to ''powiat of XXX'' scheme and fixing the List of Polish powiats page. The solution is far from perfect, but it's at least consistent. Halibu (User:Halibutt)tt (User talk:Halibutt) 15:07, 24 November 2005 (UTC) Huth was born in Krotoszyn (Krotoschin) in the Province of Posen, Prussia (Kingdom of Prussia). In 1885 he entered the University of Berlin, and he graduated at the University of Leipzig (Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)) in 1889. In 1891 he established himself at Berlin University as lecturer in Central Asiatic languages and in Buddhism. In 1897 he undertook a journey to Siberia for the purpose of studying Tungusic (Tungusic languages), receiving a subvention from the Imperial Academy of Sciences of St. Petersburg (Russian Academy of Sciences). He went to eastern Turkestan with the Turpan expedition of the Königliches Museum für Völkerkunde of Berlin, in 1902, and spent the following year in western Turkestan studying Turkish (Turkish language) dialects and folklore. Witold Dzierżykraj-Morawski was born in 1895 in his family's manor in Oporów near Krummensee (Krzemieniewo), Province of Posen, German Empire. At the age of 15 he inherited the manor and the surrounding village . As a German (Germany) citizen, after the outbreak of the Great War (World War I) he was drafted into the Imperial German army. Promoted to officer's grade, in December 1918 he joined the newly-reborn Polish Army. A field commander during the Greater Poland Uprising (Greater Poland Uprising (1918–1919)), during the Polish-Bolshevik War he became the chief of staff of the Polish 7th Cavalry Brigade.


line current

provinces or regions east of the current eastern border of Germany (Oder-Neisse line) which were lost by Germany during and after the two world wars (World War) . These territories include the most of the Province of Posen and West Prussia (lost via the Treaty of Versailles (Treaty_of_Versailles#Territorial_changes) following World War I) and East Prussia, Farther Pomerania, East Brandenburg and Lower Silesia (lost


science location

(Poznań Society of Friends of Science) location isbn 83-86079-02-9 url http: books.google.pl books?id dFooAAAAYAAJ&q Gniezno+60+rekrut%C3%B3w&dq Gniezno+60+rekrut%C3%B3w&hl en&ei FGJjTfrbNYqDOuSRqK4N&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CCUQ6AEwAA format accessdate Consequently the town was included within the Duchy of Warsaw, but upon defeat of Napoleon in Russian in 1812 was occupied by the Russian army and was returned


numerous quot

there were substantial German populations, most notably in the historical regions of Pomerelia, Upper Silesia, and Posen (Province of Posen) or Greater Poland. Lutheran Germans settled numerous "Olęder (Olędrzy)" villages along the Vistula River and its tributaries during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. In the 19th century, Germans were actively involved in developing the cloth making industry in what is now central Poland. Over 3,000 villages towns within Russian


legal studies

. He then continued his legal studies at Breslau and Berlin, and after a visit of three years to England, then the model state for German liberals, entered the Prussian judicial service. '''Moritz Lazarus''' (15 September 1824 - 13 April 1903), born at Filehne, in the Prussian province of Province of Posen

Province of Posen

The '''Province of Posen''' ( . Gerhard Köbler, ''Historisches Lexikon der Deutschen Länder: die deutschen Territorien vom Mittelalter bis zur Gegenwart'', 7th edition, C.H.Beck, 2007, p.535, ISBN 3-406-54986-1 For more than a century, it was part of the Prussian Partition, with a brief exception during the Napoleonic Wars.

Incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Posen after the 1815 Congress of Vienna, the territory was administered as a Prussian province (Provinces of Prussia) upon the Greater Poland Uprising (Greater Poland Uprising (1848)) of 1848. In 1919 according to the Treaty of Versailles, Germany (Weimar Republic) had to cede the bulk of the province to the newly established Second Polish Republic.

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