Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy

What is Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy known for?


evangelism

Kampf mit dem Drachen, Die Legende des Hl. Quirinus von Malmedy", in: ''Zwischen Venn und Schneifel, volume 9''. Website last accessed 26 December 2009. Through the seventh and eighth centuries, the two abbeys followed their mission of evangelism, along with forest clearance (logging). With the decline of the Carolingian Empire, however, the abbeys suffered the same decay as elsewhere, leaving the principality in the custody of lay abbots — temporal


painting dark

-painting 69534 The-Meuse-Valley Western painting: Dark Ages and medieval Christendom: The Meuse Valley in the ''Encyclopædia Britannica''. Last accessed 26 December 2009. A group of manuscripts from the less productive scriptorium at Malmedy were donated to the Vatican Library in 1816 by Pope Pius VII, Paul Saenger, ''Space between words: the origins of silent reading'', Stanford University Press, 2000, ISBN 978-0-8047-4016-6, page 192 including the ''Malmedy Bible'' and two lectionaries (lectionary) from about 1300. Judith Oliver, ''Gothic manuscript illumination in the diocese of Liege (c. 1250 – c. 1330)'', Uitgeverij Peeters, 1988, ISBN 978-90-6831-131-0 page 310 Malmedy illuminations show particular closeness with metalwork styles. The Triptych was certainly in the Abbey when it was suppressed in 1792, after the French Revolution. The British Museum: Exhibition of Far Eastern Art, ''The Times'', 15 June 1910 (issue 39 299), page 8, column F. The last prince-abbot, Célestin Thys, Stavelot-Malmedy, Ecclesiastic States, ''Regnal Chronologies''. Retrieved 23 October 2010 carried the triptych to Germany during the Napoleonic Wars, where it remained until 1910, when purchased by a London dealer who sold it to J. P. Morgan.


single political

. The area had, in fact, been given to Austria largely at British and Dutch insistence, as these powers feared potential French domination of the region. History Historically, French-speaking Belgium was never a single political entity until being unified under French rule during the French Revolution and Napoleonic rule. Prior to that, the region had never belonged to France. It was composed of the County of Hainaut (half of which was Treaties of Nijmegen annexed by France


short+red

George" thumb 150px alt A mediæval illustration of a man with a short red beard wearing a blue tunic and a gold over-tunic, with black tights, holding a golden orb in his left hand and a silver sceptre in his right. Above his red hair, he is wearing a gold crown. Indistinct words are faintly visible above him. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (File:Heinrich III. (HRR) Miniatur.jpg), who was present for the 1040 consecration of the church built in Stavelot under prince-abbot


evangelism of

Kampf mit dem Drachen, Die Legende des Hl. Quirinus von Malmedy", in: ''Zwischen Venn und Schneifel, volume 9''. Website last accessed 26 December 2009. Through the seventh and eighth centuries, the two abbeys followed their mission of evangelism, along with forest clearance (logging). With the decline of the Carolingian Empire, however, the abbeys suffered the same decay as elsewhere, leaving the principality in the custody of lay abbots — temporal


blue field

--- image_coat Stavelot coat of arms.jpg coat_alt Coat of arms. On a blue field, the upper half shows a man, robed in red, with a bishop's staff in his left hand, a church building in his right; the lower half shows a wolf, with pannier sacks on his back. image_map Locator Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy (1560).svg image_map_caption Stavelot-Malmedy, as at 1560, within the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle image_map_alt


862

are granted hospitality, including food for almost eight days, whilst they make their devotions (roman Catholic devotions); this hospice differs from the abbey's hospital: '' ''", an order

in an 862 abbey charter. (


main role

icon Malmedy in the ''Encyclopédie méthodique'', Panckoucke, 1788 Whilst an absolute (absolute monarchy) principality, in some matters the prince-abbot could consult a general assembly or '' The Triptych was certainly in the Abbey when it was suppressed in 1792, after the French Revolution. The British Museum: Exhibition of Far Eastern Art, ''The Times'', 15 June 1910 (issue 39 299), page 8, column F. The last prince-abbot, Célestin Thys, Stavelot-Malmedy, Ecclesiastic States, ''Regnal Chronologies''. Retrieved 23 October 2010 carried the triptych to Germany during the Napoleonic Wars, where it remained until 1910, when purchased by a London dealer who sold it to J. P. Morgan.


650

. History Establishment thumb left 75px alt A painted statue of a man in roughly his 30s, wearing a golden mitre and priestly robes in red, blue and gold. He holds a Bible in his left hand and an animal, presumably a wolf, standing at his feet. Remaclus Saint Remaclus (File:Remaclus-donderwolk.jpg) Saint Remaclus (Remaclus) founded the Abbey of Stavelot on the Amblève (Amblève (river)) river circa 650 ref name "em:Stavelot

and, thus, under the purview of the diocese of Liège, where Stavelot lay. This occurred despite several previous Imperial bulls reinforcing the position that the two abbeys should be subject to a single abbot. Leclercq (editor) ''Liste chronologique des édits et ordonnances de la principauté de Stavelot et de Malmédy, de 650 à 1793'', Em Devroye, 1852. For example: "Sans date (950, Villers; vers

in an 862 abbey charter. (


show images

, Christ, haloed in gold, is sat in centre-screen, holding a cross in his right hand and a book in his left. Miniatures in each corner show images such as an angel and a winged lion. Christ in Majesty from the Stavelot Bible File:Retablo dall'abbazia di stavelot, regione della mosa, 1160-1170.JPG alt4 Golden retable, showing Christ above the twelve disciples, shown pairwise. Retable with the Pentecost from Stavelot, c. 1170 Coat of arms The coat of arms, granted to the town of Stavelot in 1819, is also the coat of arms of the abbey — parted fesswise between an image of St Remaclus and the wolf (gray wolf), which in Stavelot's founding legend carried bricks for the building of the abbey after having killed Remaclus's donkey. Max Servais, ''Armorial des Provinces et des Communes de Belgique'', Crédit Communal de Belgique, Brussels, 1955, cited in Coat of arms of Stavelot on ''Heraldry of the World'', last accessed 26 December 2009. See also *List of Carolingian monasteries *Carolingian architecture References * ''This article makes use of the articles The Triptych was certainly in the Abbey when it was suppressed in 1792, after the French Revolution. The British Museum: Exhibition of Far Eastern Art, ''The Times'', 15 June 1910 (issue 39 299), page 8, column F. The last prince-abbot, Célestin Thys, Stavelot-Malmedy, Ecclesiastic States, ''Regnal Chronologies''. Retrieved 23 October 2010 carried the triptych to Germany during the Napoleonic Wars, where it remained until 1910, when purchased by a London dealer who sold it to J. P. Morgan.

Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy

The '''Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy''' was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire. Princely power was exercised by the Benedictine (Order of Saint Benedict) abbot of the imperial double monastery of Stavelot and Malmedy, founded in 651. At ''Hernach volgend die zehen Krayß (:de:s:Hernach volgend die zehen Krayß#Seite 12: Niderlendisch vnnd Westuelisch Krayß)'' (1532)

As a prince-abbot, the abbot of Stavelot-Malmedy sat in the College of Ruling Princes of the Ecclesiastical Bench of the Imperial Diet (Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)). Along with the handful of other prince-abbots, he cast a full vote ('' ''), in contrast to the majority of imperial abbots who were only entitled to a collective vote on their respective curial benches.

In 1795 the principality was abolished and its territory was incorporated into the French département (departments of France#Napoleonic Empire) of Ourthe (Ourthe (department)). History on the official website of Stavelot. Last accessed 26 December 2009. and Malmedy became part of the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) district (districts of Prussia) of Eupen-Malmedy. Both are currently parts of the Kingdom of Belgium (Belgium) — since the 1830 Belgian Revolution and the 1919 Treaty of Versailles respectively.

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