Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy

What is Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy known for?


wearing

. History Establishment thumb left 75px alt A painted statue of a man in roughly his 30s, wearing a golden mitre and priestly robes in red, blue and gold. He holds a Bible in his left hand and an animal, presumably a wolf, standing at his feet. Remaclus Saint Remaclus (File:Remaclus-donderwolk.jpg) Saint Remaclus (Remaclus) founded the Abbey of Stavelot on the Amblève (Amblève (river)) river circa 650 ref name "em:Stavelot

George" thumb 150px alt A mediæval illustration of a man with a short red beard wearing a blue tunic and a gold over-tunic, with black tights, holding a golden orb in his left hand and a silver sceptre in his right. Above his red hair, he is wearing a gold crown. Indistinct words are faintly visible above him. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (File:Heinrich III. (HRR) Miniatur.jpg), who was present for the 1040 consecration of the church built in Stavelot under prince-abbot


art painting

Stavelot Bible in ''The British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (Illuminated manuscript). Last accessed 26 December 2009. and other works can be identified from the same scriptorium. The bible has been described as "a perfect microcosm of the influences and interests that gave rise to the first Romanesque painting (Romanesque art#Painting)".


small set

. The entrance is preceded by a small set of steps and is surmounted by an ornament showing two figures supporting a coat of arms. Stavelot Abbey thumb alt A courtyard is surrounded by a stone building, with ivy growing around wooden-framed windows. Malmedy Abbey (File:Malmedy JPG02.jpg) In 747, Carloman, Duke of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia (Carloman (mayor of the palace)), increased the abbeys' lands from his own on his abdication. ref name "Carolingians p59


small independent

of Flemish Brabant - Province of Hainaut - Province of Liège - Province of Limburg (Limburg (Belgium)) - Province of Luxembourg - Province of Namur - Province of Walloon Brabant (Walloon Brabant) - Province of West Flanders - Provinces of regions in Belgium - Public Centre for Social Welfare - Purple (government) - Putte - Puurs Stavelot was the seat of the Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy, a small independent region of the Holy Roman Empire, ruled by the abbots of Stavelot. The principality was dissolved in 1795 during the French Revolution. At the Congress of Vienna in 1815, Stavelot was added to the Kingdom of the Netherlands while Malmedy was added to the Prussian Rhineland. In 1830 it became part of Belgium. (Malmedy would also become a part of Belgium, but not until 1919.) thumb A map of the dominion of the Habsburg (Image:Habsburg Map 1547.jpg)s following the Battle of Mühlberg (1547) as depicted in ''The Cambridge Modern History Atlas'' (1912); Habsburg lands are shaded green. From 1556 the dynasty's lands in the Low Countries, the east of France, Italy, Sardinia, and Sicily were retained by the Spanish Habsburgs. thumb The Low Countries (with Prince-Bishopric of Liège Liège (Image:Espagnols.PNG), Stavelot-Malmedy (Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy) and Bouillon (County of Bouillon)) until 1795 Under the Treaty of Utrecht (1713), following the War of the Spanish Succession, what was left of the Spanish Netherlands was ceded to Austria and thus became known as the '''Austrian Netherlands'''. However, the Austrians themselves generally had little interest in the region (aside from a short-lived attempt by Emperor Charles VI (Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor) to compete with British and Dutch trade through the Ostend Company), and the fortresses along the border (the Barrier Fortresses (Barrier Treaty)) were, by treaty, garrisoned with Dutch troops. The area had, in fact, been given to Austria largely at British and Dutch insistence, as these powers feared potential French domination of the region. History Historically, French-speaking Belgium was never a single political entity until being unified under French rule during the French Revolution and Napoleonic rule. Prior to that, the region had never belonged to France. It was composed of the County of Hainaut (half of which was annexed by France (Treaties of Nijmegen) under Louis XIV), the County of Namur, the Prince-Bishopric of Liège, the Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy, the southern part of the Duchy of Brabant and the western part of the Duchy of Luxembourg. ** Speyer (Prince-Bishopric of Speyer) - Damian August Philipp von Limburg-Vehlen-Styrum, Prince-Bishop of Speyer (1770–1797) ** Stavelot-Malmedy (Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy) - Jacques de Hubin, Prince-Abbot of Stavelot-Malmedy (1766–1786) ** Strasbourg (Prince-Bishopric of Strasbourg) - Louis René de Rohan-Guemené, Prince-Bishop of Strasbourg (1779–1801) **'''Bishopric of Speyer''' - Lothar Friedrich (Lothar Friedrich von Metternich) (1652–1675) **'''Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy''' - Franz I Egon (Franz Egon von Fürstenberg), Abbot of Stablo and Malmedy (1657–1682) **'''Bishopric of Strassburg - Leopold Wilhelm (Archduke Leopold Wilhelm of Austria) (1626–1662) The outer triptych is of Mosan origin, built to house the two inner triptychs of Byzantine (Byzantine Empire) origin, which predate the outer triptych by some decades. It is unknown who the artist(s) were who made it, although other works have been suggested as coming from the same workshop. We do not know with certainty who ordered it, or who paid for it. The Benedictine monastery of Stavelot ruled the Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy, a small statelet in the Holy Roman Empire, and in this period commissioned a number of magnificent pieces of religious metalwork, as well as apparently running a scriptorium which produced some significant illuminated manuscripts, most notably the Stavelot Bible of 1093–97. Stavelot Bible in ''The British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (Illuminated manuscript).'' Last accessed 26 December 2009. We know that Prince-Abbot Wibald (1098–1158), was sent on a diplomatic mission to Constantinople by the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa in 1154. The Triptych was certainly in the Abbey when it was suppressed in 1792, after the French Revolution. The British Museum: Exhibition of Far Eastern Art, ''The Times'', 15 June 1910 (issue 39 299), page 8, column F. The last prince-abbot, Célestin Thys, Stavelot-Malmedy, Ecclesiastic States, ''Regnal Chronologies''. Retrieved 23 October 2010 carried the triptych to Germany during the Napoleonic Wars, where it remained until 1910, when purchased by a London dealer who sold it to J. P. Morgan.


including food

are granted hospitality, including food for almost eight days, whilst they make their devotions (roman Catholic devotions); this hospice differs from the abbey's hospital: '' ''", an order


annual interest

, had cost the principality the sum of 2.75 million Reichsthalers, requiring the abbey to borrow 134 000 thalers from Liège and Verviers; another loan, shared amongst the communities, totalled 109 000 thalers, with annual interest of 14 161 thalers and arrears of 26 000 thalers. By the start of the 18th century the principality had lost a third of its territory, as a result of war, fires, pillage


small stone

church are presented as a footprint, with walls and column bases that enable the visitor to visualize the scale of the Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) abbey. Geography and administration File:Xhignesse JPG02.jpg thumb alt A small stone church stands in a field. The apse shows two small stained-glass windows, with empty arched niches above. The left transept is also visible, with a half-height chapel adjacent. 11th-century church


650

. History Establishment thumb left 75px alt A painted statue of a man in roughly his 30s, wearing a golden mitre and priestly robes in red, blue and gold. He holds a Bible in his left hand and an animal, presumably a wolf, standing at his feet. Remaclus Saint Remaclus (File:Remaclus-donderwolk.jpg) Saint Remaclus (Remaclus) founded the Abbey of Stavelot on the Amblève (Amblève (river)) river circa 650 ref name "em:Stavelot

and, thus, under the purview of the diocese of Liège, where Stavelot lay. This occurred despite several previous Imperial bulls reinforcing the position that the two abbeys should be subject to a single abbot. Leclercq (editor) ''Liste chronologique des édits et ordonnances de la principauté de Stavelot et de Malmédy, de 650 à 1793'', Em Devroye, 1852. For example: "Sans date (950, Villers; vers

in an 862 abbey charter. (


evangelism of

Kampf mit dem Drachen, Die Legende des Hl. Quirinus von Malmedy", in: ''Zwischen Venn und Schneifel, volume 9''. Website last accessed 26 December 2009. Through the seventh and eighth centuries, the two abbeys followed their mission of evangelism, along with forest clearance (logging). With the decline of the Carolingian Empire, however, the abbeys suffered the same decay as elsewhere, leaving the principality in the custody of lay abbots — temporal


painting quot

Stavelot Bible in ''The British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (Illuminated manuscript). Last accessed 26 December 2009. and other works can be identified from the same scriptorium. The bible has been described as "a perfect microcosm of the influences and interests that gave rise to the first Romanesque painting (Romanesque art#Painting)".

Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy

The '''Principality of Stavelot-Malmedy''' was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire. Princely power was exercised by the Benedictine (Order of Saint Benedict) abbot of the imperial double monastery of Stavelot and Malmedy, founded in 651. At ''Hernach volgend die zehen Krayß (:de:s:Hernach volgend die zehen Krayß#Seite 12: Niderlendisch vnnd Westuelisch Krayß)'' (1532)

As a prince-abbot, the abbot of Stavelot-Malmedy sat in the College of Ruling Princes of the Ecclesiastical Bench of the Imperial Diet (Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)). Along with the handful of other prince-abbots, he cast a full vote ('' ''), in contrast to the majority of imperial abbots who were only entitled to a collective vote on their respective curial benches.

In 1795 the principality was abolished and its territory was incorporated into the French département (departments of France#Napoleonic Empire) of Ourthe (Ourthe (department)). History on the official website of Stavelot. Last accessed 26 December 2009. and Malmedy became part of the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) district (districts of Prussia) of Eupen-Malmedy. Both are currently parts of the Kingdom of Belgium (Belgium) — since the 1830 Belgian Revolution and the 1919 Treaty of Versailles respectively.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017