Portuguese Mozambique

What is Portuguese Mozambique known for?


historic period

Vítor Crespo year_representative2 1974–1975 (last) title_deputy Captain-general deputy1 Francisco Barreto year_deputy1 1569–1573 (first) deputy2 Estêvão de Ataíde year_deputy2 1607–1609 (last) stat_year1 1967 stat_area1 784955 stat_pop1 7300000 '''Portuguese Mozambique''' or '''Portuguese East Africa''' are the common terms by which ''''Mozambique'''' is designated when referring to the historic period when it was a Portuguese overseas territory (Portuguese Empire). Former Portuguese Mozambique constituted a string of Portuguese colonies and later a single Portuguese overseas province along the south-east African coast, which now form the Republic of Mozambique. During its history, Portuguese Mozambique had the following formal designations: '''Captaincy of Sofala''' (1501-1569), '''Captaincy of Mozambique and Sofala''' (1570-1676), '''Captaincy-General of Mozambique and Rivers of Sofala''' (1676-1836), '''Province of Mozambique''' (1836-1926), '''Colony of Mozambique''' (1926-1951), '''Province of Mozambique''' (1951-1972) and '''State of Mozambique''' (1972-1975). Portuguese trading settlements and, later, colonies were formed along the coast from 1498, when Vasco da Gama first reached the Mozambican coast. Lourenço Marques (Lourenço Marques (explorer)) explored the area that is now Maputo Bay in 1544. He settled permanently in present-day Mozambique, where he spent most of his life, and his work was followed by other Portuguese (Portuguese people) explorers, sailors and traders. Some of these colonies were handed over in the late 19th century for rule by chartered companies such as the '' Kaúlza de Arriaga (General), O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE MOÇAMBIQUE E A PROMOÇÃO DAS SUAS POPULAÇÕES - SITUAÇÃO EM 1974, Kaúlza de Arriaga's published works and texts As part of this redevelopment program, construction of the Cahora Bassa Dam began in 1969 in the Overseas Province of Mozambique (the official designation of Portuguese Mozambique by then). This particular project became intrinsically linked with Portugal's concerns over security in the overseas colonies. The Portuguese government viewed the construction of the dam as testimony to Portugal’s “civilising mission” Allen Isaacman. ''Portuguese Colonial Intervention, Regional Conflict and Post-Colonial Amnesia: Cahora Bassa Dam, Mozambique 1965–2002'', cornell.edu. Retrieved on March 10, 2007 and intended for the dam to reaffirm Mozambican belief in the strength and security of the Portuguese colonial government. The 1960s, however, were crisis years for Portugal. Guerrilla movements (Portuguese Colonial War) emerged in the Portuguese African overseas territories of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) that aimed at liberating those territories from "the last colonial empire". Fighting three guerrilla movements for more than a decade proved to be enormously draining for a small, poor country in terms of labor and financial resources. At the same time, social changes brought about by urbanization, emigration, the growth of the working class, and the emergence of a sizable middle class put new pressures on the political system to liberalize. Instead, Salazar increased repression, and the regime became even more rigid and ossified (Wiktionary:ossified).


published works

: www.cidadevirtual.pt k-arriaga desenvol.html O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE MOÇAMBIQUE E A PROMOÇÃO DAS SUAS POPULAÇÕES - SITUAÇÃO EM 1974, Kaúlza de Arriaga's published works and texts As part of this redevelopment program, construction of the Cahora Bassa Dam began in 1969 in the Overseas Province of Mozambique (the official designation of Portuguese Mozambique by then). This particular project became intrinsically linked with Portugal's concerns over security in the overseas colonies


summer quot'

ELP (Army for Portuguese Liberation) and the Spínola (António de Spínola)-led and Francoist funded MDLP (Democratic Movement for the Liberation of Portugal). These groups carried out a number of attacks and bombings during the "Hot Summer" of 1975, mostly in the north of Portugal, while the MDLP was involved in the attempted coup of 11 March. When Spínola and his allies came to power in November, the MDLP disbanded, the ELP continued its campaign. When Portuguese Timor


centuries period

its overseas departments (Département d'outre-mer) and other territories. * For Portugal, during the 19th and 20th centuries period, ''Metrópole'' designated the European part of Portugal (Mainland Portugal plus the Azores and Madeira); the overseas provinces (Portuguese Empire) were called ''Ultramar'' ( overseas). Until 1975, Portuguese Africa's ''Ultramar'' referred to Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique), Portuguese Guinea, Cape Verde


mozambique

common_name Mozambique image_flag Flag

of Portugal.svg image_coat Lesser coat of arms of Portuguese East Africa.svg image_map LocationMozambique.svg image_map_caption Portuguese East Africa continent Africa region East Africa country Mozambique empire Portugal status Colony and overseas province (overseas territory); State of the Portuguese Empire (List of states of the Portuguese Empire) !-- `status Colony` causes `status_text` to be ignored, so we have

to use `status` and cause the template to complain about invalid values for now -- era Imperialism year_start 1498 year_end 1975 date_start date_end 25 June event_start event_end Fall of Portuguese Empire p1 Kingdom of Mutapa flag_p1 s1 People's Republic of Mozambique flag_s1 Flag of Mozambique (1975-1983).svg capital Lourenço Marques (Maputo) latd 2 latm 11 lats 20 latNS N longd 102


cidade da beira a short film

-aItuY João Belo — Xai-Xai , a film of João Belo, Portuguese Mozambique, before 1975. * — Beira (Beira, Mozambique); Cidade da Beira A short film of Beira, Portuguese Mozambique. <

wwNCk59J5Ig Cidade da Beira A short film of Beira, Portuguese Mozambique. BEIRA-CENTENÁRIO-O MEU TRIBUTO A film about Beira, Portuguese Mozambique, its Grande Hotel, and the railway station. Post-independence images of the city are shown, the film uses images of RTP 1 (Rádio e Televisão de Portugal)'s TV program ''Grande Reportagem''. By 1970, the city of Beira had 113,770 inhabitants. Political activism After


home taking

, often highly politicised by the Salazar Regime and the Independence Wars returned home, taking with them much of the European populations of Portuguese Angola, Portuguese Mozambique and to a lesser extent from Portuguese Guinea and Portuguese Timor. From May 1974 to the end of the 1970s, over a million Portuguese citizens from Portugal's African territories (mostly from Portuguese Angola (Overseas Province of Angola) and Overseas Province of Mozambique Mozambique


scale military

Kaúlza de Arriaga (General), O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE MOÇAMBIQUE E A PROMOÇÃO DAS SUAS POPULAÇÕES - SITUAÇÃO EM 1974, Kaúlza de Arriaga's published works and texts As part of this redevelopment program, construction of the Cahora Bassa Dam began in 1969 in the Overseas Province of Mozambique (the official designation of Portuguese Mozambique by then). This particular project became intrinsically linked with Portugal's concerns over security in the overseas colonies. The Portuguese government viewed the construction of the dam as testimony to Portugal’s “civilising mission” Allen Isaacman. ''Portuguese Colonial Intervention, Regional Conflict and Post-Colonial Amnesia: Cahora Bassa Dam, Mozambique 1965–2002'', cornell.edu. Retrieved on March 10, 2007 and intended for the dam to reaffirm Mozambican belief in the strength and security of the Portuguese colonial government. The 1960s, however, were crisis years for Portugal. Guerrilla movements (Portuguese Colonial War) emerged in the Portuguese African overseas territories of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) that aimed at liberating those territories from "the last colonial empire". Fighting three guerrilla movements for more than a decade proved to be enormously draining for a small, poor country in terms of labor and financial resources. At the same time, social changes brought about by urbanization, emigration, the growth of the working class, and the emergence of a sizable middle class put new pressures on the political system to liberalize. Instead, Salazar increased repression, and the regime became even more rigid and ossified (Wiktionary:ossified).


building work

was diverse, owing especially to the Portuguese cuisine and Muslim heritage, and seafood was also quite abundant. Lourenço Marques had always been a point of interest for artistic and architectural development since the first days of its urban expansion and this strong artistic spirit was responsible for attracting some of the world's most forward architects at the turn of the 20th century. The city was home to masterpieces of building work by, Pancho Guedes, Herbert Baker


major feature

, the integration of traditional authorities into the colonial administration was deepened, a level of social integration, miscegenation and social promotion based in skill and human qualities of each individual, rather than in the ethnic background, which was coined '' Kaúlza de Arriaga (General), O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE MOÇAMBIQUE E A PROMOÇÃO DAS SUAS POPULAÇÕES - SITUAÇÃO EM 1974, Kaúlza de Arriaga's published works and texts As part of this redevelopment program, construction of the Cahora Bassa Dam began in 1969 in the Overseas Province of Mozambique (the official designation of Portuguese Mozambique by then). This particular project became intrinsically linked with Portugal's concerns over security in the overseas colonies. The Portuguese government viewed the construction of the dam as testimony to Portugal’s “civilising mission” Allen Isaacman. ''Portuguese Colonial Intervention, Regional Conflict and Post-Colonial Amnesia: Cahora Bassa Dam, Mozambique 1965–2002'', cornell.edu. Retrieved on March 10, 2007 and intended for the dam to reaffirm Mozambican belief in the strength and security of the Portuguese colonial government. The 1960s, however, were crisis years for Portugal. Guerrilla movements (Portuguese Colonial War) emerged in the Portuguese African overseas territories of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) that aimed at liberating those territories from "the last colonial empire". Fighting three guerrilla movements for more than a decade proved to be enormously draining for a small, poor country in terms of labor and financial resources. At the same time, social changes brought about by urbanization, emigration, the growth of the working class, and the emergence of a sizable middle class put new pressures on the political system to liberalize. Instead, Salazar increased repression, and the regime became even more rigid and ossified (Wiktionary:ossified).

Portuguese Mozambique

'''Portuguese Mozambique''' or '''Portuguese East Africa''' are the common terms by which ''''Mozambique'''' is designated when referring to the historic period when it was a Portuguese overseas territory (Portuguese Empire). Former Portuguese Mozambique constituted a string of Portuguese colonies and later a single Portuguese overseas province along the south-east African coast, which now form the Republic of Mozambique.

During its history, Portuguese Mozambique had the following formal designations: '''Captaincy of Sofala''' (1501-1569), '''Captaincy of Mozambique and Sofala''' (1570-1676), '''Captaincy-General of Mozambique and Rivers of Sofala''' (1676-1836), '''Province of Mozambique''' (1836-1926), '''Colony of Mozambique''' (1926-1951), '''Province of Mozambique''' (1951-1972) and '''State of Mozambique''' (1972-1975).

Portuguese trading settlements and, later, colonies were formed along the coast from 1498, when Vasco da Gama first reached the Mozambican coast. Lourenço Marques (Lourenço Marques (explorer)) explored the area that is now Maputo Bay in 1544. He settled permanently in present-day Mozambique, where he spent most of his life, and his work was followed by other Portuguese (Portuguese people) explorers, sailors and traders. Some of these colonies were handed over in the late 19th century for rule by chartered companies such as the '' as an integral part of Portugal. Most of the original colonies have given their names to the modern provinces of Mozambique.

Mozambique, according to official policy, was not a colony at all but rather a part of the "pluricontinental and multiracial nation" of Portugal. Portugal sought in Mozambique, as it did in all its colonies, to Europeanise the local population and assimilate them into Portuguese culture. Lisbon also wanted to retain the colonies as trading partners and markets for its goods. African inhabitants of the colony were ultimately supposed to become full citizens with full political rights through a long development process. To that end, segregation in Mozambique was minimal compared to that in neighbouring South Africa. However, paid forced labour (forced labour#Payment for unfree labour), to which all Africans were liable if they failed to pay head taxes (tax per head), was not abolished until the early 1960s.

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