Portuguese Guinea

What is Portuguese Guinea known for?


algeria algeria

) and 50 mil réis. It was notably the underlying principle of French and Portuguese colonial rule (colonialism) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was influential in the French colonies of Algeria (French rule in Algeria), French West Africa, and Indochina (French Indochina), and in the Portuguese colonies of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Guinea (Portuguese Guinea), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Timor (Portuguese Timor). The European colonial powers felt


time social

of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) that aimed at liberating those territories from "the last colonial empire". Fighting three guerrilla movements for more than a decade proved to be enormously draining for a small, poor country in terms of labor and financial resources. At the same time, social changes brought about by urbanization, emigration, the growth of the working class, and the emergence of a sizable middle


skill+technical

specialized military, administration, teaching, health and other posts in the civil service and private businesses, as long as they had the right technical (skill) and human qualities. In addition, intermarriage (interracial marriage) of black women with white Portuguese men was a common practice since the earlier contacts with the Europeans. The access to basic, secondary and technical education was being expanded and its availability was being increasingly opened to both


social development

, the Portuguese regular army maintained control of the population centres while the guerrilla forces sought to undermine their influence in rural and tribal areas in the north and west. As part of their response to FRELIMO, the Portuguese government began to pay more attention to creating favourable conditions for social development and economic growth.

Africa Angola and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea), became part of the so-called Portuguese Colonial War (1961–1974). From a military standpoint, the Portuguese regular army held the upper hand during all of the conflicts against the independentist guerrilla forces, which created favourable conditions for social development and economic growth until the end of the conflict in 1974. CD do Diário de Notícias - Parte 08 The Front


small poor

of Angola (Portuguese Angola), Mozambique (Portuguese Mozambique) and Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) that aimed at liberating those territories from "the last colonial empire". Fighting three guerrilla movements for more than a decade proved to be enormously draining for a small, poor country in terms of labor and financial resources. At the same time, social changes brought about by urbanization, emigration, the growth of the working class, and the emergence of a sizable middle class put new pressures on the political system to liberalize. Instead, Salazar increased repression, and the regime became even more rigid and ossified (Wiktionary:ossified). list1 '''Former colonies''' list2 '''Africa & nearby Islands:''' Aguz (Souira Guedima) Souira Guedima, Morocco (1506-1525) Nova Colônia do Sacramento, Uruguay (1680-1777)


support role

Nova Colônia do Sacramento, Uruguay (1680-1777)


national interest

effectively began with the uprisings in the overseas territories in Africa during the 1960s. The independence movements active in Portuguese Angola, Portuguese Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea were supported by both the United States and the Soviet Union, which both wanted to end all colonial empires and expand their own spheres of influence. For the Portuguese ruling regime, the centuries-old overseas empire was a matter of national interest. The criticism against some

, and their peoples, more closely with Portugal itself. Colorblind Colonialism? Lusotropicalismo and Portugal’s 20th. Century Empire. in Africa. Leah Fine. Barnard College Department of History, Spring 2007 For the Portuguese ruling regime, the overseas empire was a matter of national interest. In Portuguese Africa, trained Portuguese black Africans were allowed to occupy positions in several occupations including


providing long

and Mozambique as well as providing long-range and coastal logistics to the Portuguese Armed forces in its overseas territories in the Atlantic (Cape Verde, São Tomé e Príncipe, Guinea, Angola), Indian (Mozambique) and Pacific Oceans (Timor and Macau). In amphibious missions the action of the Portuguese Marines (''fuzileiros'') was fundamental. For the Colonial wars, the Portuguese Navy had to equip itself with a large fleet of small units including corvettes, patrol boats and landing craft, most of them designed and many built in Portugal. The Portuguese (Portugal) also claimed Bolama in 1830 and a dispute developed. In 1860, the British proclaimed the island annexed to Sierra Leone, but in 1870 a commission chaired by Ulysses S. Grant awarded Bolama to Portugal. Subsequently, in 1879, Bolama became the first capital (Capital (political)) of Portuguese Guinea and remained so until its transfer to Bissau in 1941. Bissau had been founded in 1687 by Portugal as a fortified port and trading center. This transfer was needed due to the shortage of fresh water in Bolama. Bolama later became a seaplane stop, and a seaplane crash in 1931 is commemorated by a statue in the town. Alfa Yaya's relationship with the French went downhill in 1904, when French ceded part of Labé to the control of Portuguese Guinea, effectively taking away part of Alfa Yaya's territory. He planned a revolt, but a spy gave him away; he was arrested and deported to Dahomey in 1905. Released in 1910, he immediately began to organize resistance; he was again arrested in 1911 and taken to Port Etienne, where he died on 10 October 1912. colspan "3" Angola Brazil Cape Verde East Timor (Portuguese Timor) Guinea-Bissau (Portuguese Guinea) Portuguese India Macau (Macao) Mozambique São Tomé and Príncipe History '''Transportes Aéreos da Guiné Portuguesa''' was founded in 1960 to operate flights within Portuguese Guinea as its national airline. Services on international routes from Bissau to Dakar, Ilha do Sal and Praia were inaugurated not long after foundation. A de Havilland Heron and two de Havilland Dragon Rapides were operating on the routes by 1961. By 1968 the airline was operating two de Havilland Herons, three Dornier Do 27s, one Cessna 206, one Cessna 172 and one Auster. The Portuguese (Portugal) national airline, TAP-Air Portugal took over some TAGP flights, operating them with Boeing aircraft instead of with TAGP's Cessnas. TAP operates from Ilha do Sal to Bissau with the Boeings, and TAGP would operate the return flight with its light aircraft. Nova Colônia do Sacramento, Uruguay (1680-1777)


close support

West Africa Angola in the close-support role. Nicolli 2003, p.174 The first 40 G.91 were purchased second-hand from the Luftwaffe, out of the aircraft that had originally been produced for Greece and which differed from the rest of the Luftwaffe G.91s sufficiently to create maintenance problems. The aircraft replaced the Portuguese F-86 Sabre. Colonial War The army participated in colonial war (Portuguese Colonial War) from


promoting+strong

countries supported the guerrillas with weapons and military training. The conflict in Portuguese Guinea involving the PAIGC guerrillas and the Portuguese Army was the most intense and damaging of all Portuguese Colonial War. Thus, during the 1960s and early 1970s, Portuguese development plans promoting strong economic growth and effective socioeconomic policies, like those applied by the Portuguese in the other two theaters of war (Portuguese Angola and Portuguese Mozambique

Portuguese Guinea

'''Portuguese Guinea''' ( ), called the '''Overseas Province of Guinea''' from 1951, was a West African colony of Portugal (Portuguese Empire) from the late 15th century until 10 September 1974, when it gained independence as Guinea-Bissau.

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