Portobello, Dublin

What is Portobello, Dublin known for?


business family

of a prominent Dublin business family and a director of the Grand Canal Company). He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


largest educational

Post Company). The students were relocated to the DBS facility in George's St. In 2011, one of India's largest educational institutions, the Rayat Bahra Group, moved into nearby Harbour House, once a part of Portobello College, and set up the Lamrin Business School. Irish Times, 8 June 2011 In 2009, a new national and cultural centre was opened in the Christian Brothers monastery on Synge St. called The Lantern, which is aiming to be a place of hospitality to promote intercultural and interfaith dialogue. The Lantern centre The name "lantern" was chosen to celebrate the life of Nano Nagle who searched the back lanes of Cork each evening with her lantern seeking those who lacked food and shelter. She inspired Edmund Ignatius Rice to found the Congregation of Christian Brothers and the Presentation Brothers with her work for the poor and disadvantaged. Opening of the Lantern centre on Edmund Rice website In May 2011, The new Minister for Justice, Equality and Defence, Alan Shatter opened a Cathal Brugha Barracks Visitors centre to the public commemorating those that fought for the Irish War of Independence. Minister Shatter opens historic visitor centre in Cathal Brugha Barracks, Irish Defence forces, www.military.ie Notable residents The earliest written accounts we have of residents in the area date from the 18th century—as the city spread southwards houses on the main roads or in select by-roads such as Charlemont Mall were occupied by the better-off citizens. This trend continued in the first half of the 19th century, but with the development of the smaller streets from around 1860 and finally the artisans' dwellings, a mix of classes ended up in the area. By the beginning of the 20th century, the grand houses that had been erected along the Grand Canal had been turned into poverty-stricken tenements, while more exclusive suburbs such as Terenure and Rathgar became the havens of the rich. The following list shows the range of people that have been associated with the area over the past 200 years. thumb Charlemont Street (early 70s) (File:Charlemontst.jpg) *The playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950) was born on Synge Street. He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


film version

Boylan first Henry year 1999 publisher Gill and Macmillan location Dublin isbn 0-7171-2945-4 He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


founder member

approached Thomas Clarke (Thomas Clarke (Irish republican)), who recruited him to Fianna Éireann, an organisation of young republicans. Mellows was introduced to socialism when he met James Connolly at Countess Markievicz (Constance Markievicz)'s residence, recuperating after his hunger strike. Connolly was deeply impressed and told his daughter Nora 'I have found a real man'. He was active in the IRB (Irish Republican Brotherhood) and was a founder member of the Irish Volunteers, being brought onto its Organising Committee to strengthen the Fianna representation. He was arrested and jailed on several occasions under the Defence of the Realm Act. Eventually escaping from Reading Jail (Reading (HM Prison)) he returned to Ireland to command the "Western Division" (forces operating in the West of Ireland) of the IRA (Irish Republican Army) during the Easter Rising of 1916. He led roughly 700 Volunteers in abortive attacks on Royal Irish Constabulary stations at Oranmore, and Clarinbridge in county Galway and took over the town of Athenry. However, his men were very badly armed and supplied and they dispersed after a week, when British troops and the cruiser He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


time performing

at a further trial (they were in America). However, the following year, Blondin was back at the same venue in Dublin, this time performing 100 feet above the ground. ''Irish Times'', 1861, 1862 Career Mellows was born in Manchester, England, to William Joseph Mellows, a British Army non-commissioned officer, and Sarah Jordan, of Inch, County Wexford, ''Irish Independent'', 2 December 1952. where he grew up. His family moved to Fairview


largest educational'

Post Company). The students were relocated to the DBS facility in George's St. In 2011, one of India's largest educational institutions, the Rayat Bahra Group, moved into nearby Harbour House, once a part of Portobello College, and set up the Lamrin Business School. Irish Times, 8 June 2011 In 2009, a new national and cultural centre was opened in the Christian Brothers monastery on Synge St. called The Lantern, which is aiming to be a place of hospitality to promote intercultural and interfaith dialogue. The Lantern centre The name "lantern" was chosen to celebrate the life of Nano Nagle who searched the back lanes of Cork each evening with her lantern seeking those who lacked food and shelter. She inspired Edmund Ignatius Rice to found the Congregation of Christian Brothers and the Presentation Brothers with her work for the poor and disadvantaged. Opening of the Lantern centre on Edmund Rice website In May 2011, The new Minister for Justice, Equality and Defence, Alan Shatter opened a Cathal Brugha Barracks Visitors centre to the public commemorating those that fought for the Irish War of Independence. Minister Shatter opens historic visitor centre in Cathal Brugha Barracks, Irish Defence forces, www.military.ie Notable residents The earliest written accounts we have of residents in the area date from the 18th century—as the city spread southwards houses on the main roads or in select by-roads such as Charlemont Mall were occupied by the better-off citizens. This trend continued in the first half of the 19th century, but with the development of the smaller streets from around 1860 and finally the artisans' dwellings, a mix of classes ended up in the area. By the beginning of the 20th century, the grand houses that had been erected along the Grand Canal had been turned into poverty-stricken tenements, while more exclusive suburbs such as Terenure and Rathgar became the havens of the rich. The following list shows the range of people that have been associated with the area over the past 200 years. thumb Charlemont Street (early 70s) (File:Charlemontst.jpg) *The playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950) was born on Synge Street. He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


water works

representatives from Rathmines were unwilling to cough up the necessary money for a new water-works, but the will of the majority prevailed, and the new Vartry Reservoir was completed in 1863. Samuel A. Ossory Fitzpatrick: A Historical and Topographical Account of the City 1907 ;The hotel The hotel at the harbour was opened in 1807 (the architect was James Colbourne). In 1858 it was taken over by a Catholic order of nuns, who used it as an asylum (St. Mary's) for blind girls. A few years later they successfully appealed to the Guardians of the South Dublin Union for some finance (it cost £10 to keep a girl for a year), though the Irish Times in an editorial frowned upon this proselytising by "Romanists", while they lauded the efforts of the Protestant-run "Home for Orphans" at 7 South Richmond Street (which advertised frequently for "fresh souls to save" in the same newspaper). He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


long time

up. For some unaccountable reason he took his army over to Finglas, where he spent a month, which allowed the Roundheads to reinforce and plan their attack. By the time Ormonde's main force moved around to the south of the city, the Roundheads were ready and fighting broke out. Ormonde's army was defeated, many of them killed, and the place where they fell (mainly between Rathmines and Ranelagh) was known for a long time as the Bloody Fields. F. Elrington Ball: A History of the County Dublin. 1903. Part II. page 103 et passim The name of the Bleeding Horse pub (The Bleeding Horse) in Camden Street reputedly originated at this time from a horse wandering from the scene of the battle to St. Kevin's Port (now Camden Street). The Bleeding Horse pub is reputed to be the second oldest pub in Dublin, allegedly licensed in 1649. Writers such as James Joyce, Oliver St. John Gogarty and John Elwood were familiar with this tavern. 18th century Portobello was part of the Manor of St. Sepulchre, one of the liberties of Dublin. The courthouse (still standing) and gaol for the use of the manor were located at the corner of Long Lane and New Bride Street. 19th century ;The barracks The nearby Portobello Barracks (now Cathal Brugha Barracks) was constructed between 1810 and 1815, and has been in continual use since then. In 1817, William Windham Sadlier successfully flew in a hot air balloon from Portobello Barracks to Holyhead in North Wales. The 1837 Ordnance Survey map showed one building on the western side of Richmond St. (excluding property belonging to the Portobello Hotel), which corresponds to no. 34, which was the Caroline Records shop (closed in 2003). 1837 OS map In 1867, at the time of the Fenian Uprising (Fenian Brotherhood), security was stepped up, and an innocent young resident of Bloomfield Avenue, walking his dog in the vicinity, was accused of breaking and entry, among other things. Admittedly, he had a hard time explaining away the gun and eighteen bullets he had in his pocket, but he was acquitted of any wrongdoing. He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


important roles

He afterwards returned to the Abbey theatre. In 1936 John Ford brought him to the United States to act in a film version of ''The Plough and the Stars''. Disbandment In April 1917 the 4RMF joined the 5RMF at the Curragh. In August the 4th moved to Castlebar County Mayo, the 5th to Galway. With the changed political situation and growth in support for Sinn Féin loyalty was under test. Reports of loss of rifles, Lewis guns and ammunition necessitated the massive transfer of the battalions out of the country in November, the 3rd to Devonport (HMNB Devonport), England, the others to Scotland, 4th to Invergordon the 5th to Dreghorn. Staunton pp.165-6 With the possibility of the extension of conscription to Ireland those Irish battalions still stationed in Ireland were transferred to England in April 1918. The RMFs were relocated again, 3rd to Plymouth, 4th to Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) and the 5th to Fort George (Fort George, Scotland), all three eventually amalgamating at Plymouth by August. The 3rd was absorbed into the 1st RMF in June 1919 . The Tralee Depot and the remaining reserves were moved to Devonport (HMNB Devonport) in England where they were disbanded on 31. July 1922. Staunton p.166


life work

Philanthropists '' by Robert Tressell was also very influential, conveying a powerful anti-capitalist message. thumb 250px Terenure College, formerly Terenure House (Image:Terenure College, Dublin.jpg) With Rathgar and the area around Portobello (Portobello, Dublin) in Dublin 8, Terenure has traditionally

Portobello, Dublin

In Dublin, '''Portobello''' ( – meaning 'beautiful harbour') is an area stretching westwards from South Richmond Street as far as Upper Clanbrassil Street bordered on the north by the South Circular Road (South Circular Road (Dublin)) and on the south by the Grand Canal (Grand Canal (Ireland)).

Portobello came into existence as a small suburb south of the city of Dublin in the 18th century, centred on Richmond St. During the following century it was completely developed, transforming an area of private estates and farmland into solid Victorian (Victorian house) red-bricked living quarters for the middle classes (on the larger streets), and terraced housing bordering the canal for the working classes.

As a fast-expanding suburb during the 19th century Portobello attracted many upwardly-mobile families whose members went on to play important roles in politics, the arts and the sciences. Towards the end of the century came an influx of Jews, refugees from pogroms in Eastern Europe, which gave the name "Little Jerusalem" to the area.

It is in the postal district (Dublin postal districts) of Dublin 8. It is in the local government electoral area of Dublin South East Inner City and the Dáil Constituency of Dublin South–East (Dublin South–East (Dáil Éireann constituency)).

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