Port Sudan

What is Port Sudan known for?


submarines

and Yemen (People's Democratic Republic of Yemen) to receive the submarines on their way to Pakistan in Port Sudan and Aden as a friendly visit. Pakistan's approval to receive Egyptian vessels for repairs were made public. On October 1, a force containing several submarines, destroyers and missile boats set sail on a route planned to ensure their arrival at Bab-el-Mandeb on October 6. The fleet was fully equipped for combat, and the force was ordered to maintain complete radio silence

; which meant there was no way of recalling the submarines. The commanding officers, unaware of their real mission, were issued sealed envelopes detailing their orders and mission, and were instructed to open the envelopes on October 6, only a few hours before the war was to begin, whereupon they would break their radio silence. Once the fleet had set sail that day, October 1, "''the war had effectively begun''". El Gamasy, p.195 ref>

, and southeastern Egypt. There are smaller populations of other Beja ethnic groups in Egypt's Eastern Desert. Some Beja groups are nomadic (nomads). The Kharga Oasis in Egypt is home to a large number of Qamhat Bisharin who were displaced by the Aswan High Dam (Aswan Dam). Jebel Uweinat is a revered by the Qamhat. Some of these breakout attempts were successful. Four Italian submarines successfully reached Bordeaux, two out of three of the Italian armed merchantmen reached Kobe


refineries

on a pipeline to Port Sudan on Sudan's Red Sea coast, as South Sudan itself is landlocked, as well as on Sudan's superior refinery (oil refinery) infrastructure. The exact terms of a revenue-splitting agreement between Juba and Khartoum have yet to be established, but Sudan will likely receive a significant portion of the income from South Sudan's oil sales as a fee for the use of Sudanese pipelines, refineries, and port facilities, perhaps as much as 50 percent of the profits. ref

part of Sudanese territory, are linked to the country's refineries via pipelines. The two largest oil pipelines are the Greater Nile Oil Pipeline, which travels 1,600 kilometres from the Unity oil field to Port Sudan on the Red Sea via Khartoum, and the PetroDar pipeline, which extends 1,380 kilometres from the Palogue oil field in the Melut Basin to Port Sudan. Anon (no date), 'Melut Basin Oil Project


largest oil

''Sawákin'') is a port in north-eastern Sudan, on the west coast of the Red Sea. In 1983 it had a population of 18,030 and the 2009 estimate is 43, 337. World Gazeteer It was formerly the region's chief port, but is now secondary to Port Sudan, about 30 miles north. The old city built of coral is in ruins. Ferries run daily from Suakin to Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. EASSy runs from Mtunzini in South Africa to Port Sudan in Sudan, with landing points in nine countries and is connected to at least ten landlocked countries—which will no longer have to rely on satellite Internet access to carry voice and data services. Transportation and communication The city is served by a station (Railway stations in Sudan) on the national railway network (Rail transport in Sudan). It is linked with the capital Khartoum via Wad Medani city by a net of roads, railway, airway, and seasonal direct roads. It is also linked to Port Sudan city with roads and railway through Kassala at a distance of about 200 km. There are also roads to the Gallabat at the edge of the boundary with Ethiopia connecting Gedarif with the Ethiopian city of Gonder, and from there to the Ethiopian capital Addis Abeba. The city has also an airport at Al-azaza area called Gedaref Azaza Airport ( its international air port code in IATA is GSU, and in ICAO is HSGF. http: www.maplandia.com sudan airports gedaref-azaza-airport Inhabitants


jeddah

Italian command. Tourism thumb left Minaret in Port Sudan (Image:Minaret S.jpg) Port Sudan is known among tourists for its excellent scuba-diving and beaches. Tourists, as well as far larger numbers of Muslim pilgrims en route to undertake their once-in-a-lifetime Hajj to Mecca, use Port Sudan as a departure point to cross the Red Sea to Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. Economy thumb left 200px Warehouses in Port Sudan (File:Warehouses, Port Sudan.jpg) The harbour

also a number of tugboats, which were used to berth ships in the narrow inlet. The slow but steady growth continued during the 1950s and services were inaugurated to Istanbul, Karachi, Amman, Kuwait City, Asmara, and Port Sudan. The fleet also saw a small growth during the 1950s, with five DC-4s and ten Convair 340s, the first pressurized aircraft for the airline. In 1959, the airline's first maintenance center was inaugurated in Jeddah. Also during

this decade, the very important air link between Jeddah and Riyadh saw improvement. * Lancaster (Lancaster, Lancashire), United Kingdom Sudan has a native Coptic minority, although many Copts in Sudan are descended from more recent Egyptian immigrants. Minority Rights Group International, World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples – Sudan


quot opposition

of WikiPedia:Port Sudan Commons:Category:Port Sudan


oil rich

. With rising oil revenues, the Sudanese economy was booming, with a growth rate of about nine percent in 2007. Sustained growth was expected the next year in 2008 due to not only increasing oil production, but also to the boost of hydroelectricity (annual electricity yield of 5.5 TWh) provided by the Merowe Dam. The independence of oil-rich South Sudan, however, placed most major oilfields out of the Sudanese government's direct control. In order to export oil, South Sudan must rely

, single-track railroad with a feeder line, supplemented by limited river steamers, Sudan airways, and about 1,900&nbsp


title red

WikiPedia:Port Sudan Commons:Category:Port Sudan


188

;background:#efefef;" Population188&srt npan&col aohdq&pt c&va x.&srt pnan http: bevoelkerungsstatistik.de - 1906 Encyclopædia Britannica von 1911: Band 22, Seite 134 style "text-align:right;" 4,289 - 1941 style "text-align:right;" 26,255 - 1973

سواكن ''Sawákin'') is a port in north-eastern Sudan, on the west coast of the Red Sea. In 1983 it had a population of 18,030 and the 2009 estimate is 43, 337.188&srt npan&col abcdefghinoq&msz 1500&pt c&va &geo 392781733 World Gazeteer It was formerly the region's chief port, but is now secondary to Port Sudan, about 30 miles north. The old city


oil field

;km. (1,200 mi.) of paved and gravel road—primarily in greater Khartoum, Port Sudan, and the north. Some north-south roads serve the oil fields of neighboring South Sudan. The Greater Nile Oil Pipeline extends from the Heglig (Heglig oil field) (Sudan) and Unity (Unity oil field) (South Sudan) oil fields via the Nuba Mountains and Khartoum to the oil export terminal in Port Sudan on the Red Sea. Most of Sudan's oil

part of Sudanese territory, are linked to the country's refineries via pipelines. The two largest oil pipelines are the Greater Nile Oil Pipeline, which travels 1,600 kilometres from the Unity oil field to Port Sudan on the Red Sea via Khartoum, and the PetroDar pipeline, which extends 1,380 kilometres from the Palogue oil field in the Melut Basin to Port Sudan. Anon (no date), 'Melut Basin Oil Project, Sudan', ''www.hydrocarbons-technology.com''. Retrieved on 6 March 2008. European Coalition on Oil in Sudan 2007, 'ECOS Fact Sheet', ''www.ecosonline.org'', October, p. 4. Retrieved on 6 March 2007. thumb right 250px Map of transportation in Sudan (1991). (Image:Sudan 1991 transportation map.png) '''Transport in Sudan''' during the early 1990s included an extensive railroad system that served the more important populated areas except in the far south, a meager road network (very little of which consisted of all-weather roads), a natural inland waterway—the Nile River and its tributaries—and a national airline that provided both international and domestic service. Complementing this infrastructure was Port Sudan, a major deep-water port on the Red Sea, and a small but modern national merchant marine. Additionally, a pipeline transporting petroleum products extended from the port to Khartoum. Ports and shipping In 1990, Sudan had only one operational deep-water harbor (seaport), Port Sudan, situated on an inlet of the Red Sea. The port had been built from scratch, beginning in 1905, to complement the railroad line from Khartoum to the Red Sea by serving as the entry and exit point for the foreign trade the rail line was to carry. It operated as a department of SRC until 1974 when it was transferred to the Sea Ports Corporation (Sea Ports Corporation, Sudan), a newly established public enterprise (company) set up to manage Sudan's marine ports. Facilities at the port eventually included fifteen cargo berths, sheds, warehouses, and storage tanks for edible oils, molasses, and petroleum products. Equipment included quay, mobile, and other cranes (Crane (machine)), and some forklift trucks, but much of the handling of cargo was manual. There were also a number of tugboats, which were used to berth ships in the narrow inlet. The slow but steady growth continued during the 1950s and services were inaugurated to Istanbul, Karachi, Amman, Kuwait City, Asmara, and Port Sudan. The fleet also saw a small growth during the 1950s, with five DC-4s and ten Convair 340s, the first pressurized aircraft for the airline. In 1959, the airline's first maintenance center was inaugurated in Jeddah. Also during this decade, the very important air link between Jeddah and Riyadh saw improvement. * WikiPedia:Port Sudan Commons:Category:Port Sudan


play music

AlKabli was born in the city of Port Sudan in 1933. During childhood, he developed an interest in the Arabic language, especially the old Arabic poems, and learned to play music on a penny whistle. At the age of sixteen, he moved to Khartoum to attend the Khartoum Commercial Secondary School. His musical interest evolved to oud (lute), which he learnt by himself. - style "background:#DCDCDC" Port Sudan WikiPedia:Port Sudan Commons:Category:Port Sudan

Port Sudan

'''Port Sudan''' ( , it has 489,725 residents. Located on the Red Sea, it is the Republic of Sudan's main port city.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017