Poitou

What is Poitou known for?


theme set

of the Palais Royal, where Lemercier's work can be seen in the ''cour d'honneur'' facing the Place. A more expansive town-planning (City planning) project, one of the most ambitious non-military French projects of the century, was the palatial residence, the grand parish church and the entire new town of Richelieu (Richelieu, Indre-et-Loire), in Poitou (Indre-et-Loire). The lost château itself was an improvisation on the theme set by Brosse's Luxembourg. Also for the Cardinal


book publishing

a monk at the Abbey of Marnes in France. Later on, St Paternus went to Wales where he built a monastery called Llanpatenvaur. "Lives of the Saints, For Every Day of the Year" edited by Rev. Hugo Hoever, S.O.Cist, Ph.D., New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1955, p. 151 Before long, he wished to attain the perfection of Christian virtue by a life of penance in solitude. He went into solitude with his fellow monk, Saint Scubilion. The forest


powerful family

Genealogical database publisher Gene Web url http: roglo.eu roglo?lang en;p philippe;n de+la+clyte+de+commines accessdate 2009-03-27 Despite later reverses in the family's fortunes, on 13 August 1504 their only child, Jeanne de Commines (d.1513), made a splendid marriage to the heir of Brittany's most powerful family, René de Brosse comte de Penthièvre (Count of Penthièvre) (d.1524).

fortunes, on 13 August 1504 their only child, Jeanne de Commines (d.1513), made a splendid marriage to the heir of Brittany's most powerful family, René de Brosse comte de Penthièvre (Count of Penthièvre) (d.1524). Through her descendants, Commines would become


traditional military

-Mignon , Deux-Sèvres, Poitou, the son of a baker. He was born into the lowest levels of European society. The orphaned son of a prison convict, uneducated, frail, and thin, he was the antithesis of the traditional military commander adventurer. The reading of ''Robinson Crusoe'' kindled in him a love of travel and adventure, and at the age of sixteen he made a voyage to Senegal whence he went to Guadeloupe. Returning to Senegal in 1818 he made a journey to Bondu to carry


historical novels

of the "Angelique (Angelique (French series))" series of historical novels are set in 17th Century Poitou. See also *Count of Poitiers for a list of the ''Comtes de Poitou''. *Poitou-Charentes for the present-day ''région (Région of France)'' including Poitiers. *Poitevin (language), the French regional language spoken in Poitou (Saintongeais is for Saintonge). References External links *http: www.acpo.on.ca claude poitou.htm <


cultural ties

'''Andre de Chauvigny''' (or '''Andrew of Chauvigny''') (1150–1202) was a Poitevin (Poitou) knight in the service of Richard I of England. He was the second son of Pierre-Hélie of Chauvigny and Haois of Châtellerault. Haois was the great-aunt of King Richard making Andrew and Richard relatives. Lusignan was constructed in the region of Poitou, occupying a natural strongpoint: a narrow promontory that overlooked steep valleys on either side. It was already so impressive in the 12th century that a legend developed to the effect that its founder had faery aid, in the guise of the water spirit Melusine, who built it and its church through her arts, as a gift for her husband Raymondin. *1366: The Black Prince intervenes in the civil war in Castile (Crown of Castile) between Pedro the Cruel (Pedro of Castile) and Henry of Trastamara (Henry II of Castile). *1370: John Chandos, the English Seneschal of Poitou is defeated and slain at Chateau Lussac. *1372: French commander Bertrand du Guesclin captures Poitiers. He was created a Knight of the Garter in 1369. He was almost captured on a raid into Poitou that year, having refused to share command with Sir John Chandos, but Chandos heard of his plight and rescued him. The moiety of ''Little Bispham and Norbreck'' was given to the monks of Shrewsbury Abbey by Roger of Poitou. In the early 12th century Henry I (Henry I of England) ordered Stephen Count of Mortain to hold the moiety "free and quit of all customs, pleas and suits of the hundred court (Hundred (country subdivision)). A few years after, David I of Scotland confirmed the moiety "to be held as freely as in the time of his predecessors." In about 1270 the abbot and convent of Shrewsbury granted Little Bispham and Norbreck to the Abbot and convent of Dieulacres Abbey, who held the adjoining Rossall estate. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, it was granted as part of Rossall estate, in 1553 to Thomas Fleetwood. Thus by then all three hamlets were owned by Thomas Fleetwood. declare through this official statement directed to all who will read it . . . that the very same lord Pope wishing and intending to know the pure, complete, and uncompromised truth from the leaders of the said Order, namely Brother Jacques de Molay, Grandmaster of the Order of Knights Templar, Brother Raymbaud de Caron, Preceptor of the commandaries of Templar Knights in Outremer, Brother Hugo de Pérraud (Hugues de Pairaud), Preceptor of France (France in the Middle Ages), Brother Geoffroy de Gonneville, Preceptor of Aquitania and Poitou, and Geoffroy de Charney, Preceptor of Normandy, ordered and commissioned us specifically and by his verbally expressed will in order that we might with diligence examine the truth by questioning the grandmaster and the aforementioned preceptors one-by-one and individually, having summoned notaries public and trustworthy witnesses. (Chinon Parchment dated August 17-20, 1308) '''Saint Paternus of Avranches''' in Normandy (c. 482-565) was born around the year 482, although the exact year is unknown, in Poitiers, Poitou. He was born into a Christian (Christianity) family. His father Patranus went to Ireland to spend his days as a hermit in holy solitude. Because of this, Paternus embraced religious life. He became a monk at the Abbey of Marnes in France. Later on, St Paternus went to Wales where he built a monastery called Llanpatenvaur. "Lives of the Saints, For Every Day of the Year" edited by Rev. Hugo Hoever, S.O.Cist, Ph.D., New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1955, p. 151 Before long, he wished to attain the perfection of Christian virtue by a life of penance in solitude. He went into solitude with his fellow monk, Saint Scubilion. The forest of Seicy in the diocese of Coutances was the place he became a hermit. Language The archipelago of ''les Saintes'' is mostly populated by the descendants of colonists from Brittany and Normandy, and inhabitants of Poitou, Saintonge and Anjou who are mostly from the first French families that lived on Saint Christopher and Nevis when it was a French colony. The population has the peculiarity of having a big majority of European origin and speaks a variety of popular American French, hwith some terms of Old French. Biography Daphné was born in Clermont-Ferrand, Puy-de-Dôme, France but never actually lived in the prefecture of Auvergne (Auvergne (region)). She has stayed in Paris, Poitiers in the Poitou region, the Alps and even abroad. History The town's name derives from the Gallic (Gaulish language) word "Equoranda", which refers to a river or stream separating two Gallic tribes (in this case the Pictons (of Poitou) and the Bituriges (of the Berry). Richard Marshal came to the fore as the leader of the baronial party, and the chief antagonist of the foreign friends of King Henry III of England, notably Poitevin (Poitou) Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester and Peter de Rivaux. Powicke (1962), pp. 53&ndash;5. Fearing their treachery, he refused to visit King Henry III at Gloucester in August 1233, and King Henry declared him a traitor. In March 1234, a truce was reached between the king and Marshal, the condition of which was the removal of Peter de Rivaux from court. Power (2004). In the meanwhile, however, conflict had broken out in Ireland between Marshal's brothers and some of the king's supporters. '''Hugh VIII the Old of Lusignan''' or '''Hugh III of La Marche''' or '''Hugues VIII le Vieux de Lusignan''' was the eldest son of Hugh VII (Hugh VII of Lusignan) and of Sarrasine or Saracena de Lezay. He became Seigneur de Lusignan, Couhé, and Château-Larcher and Count of La Marche on his father's death in 1151. Born in Poitou, 1106–1110 or some time after 1125, he died in Holy Land in 1165 or 1171. Some of the first North American settlers of this name or some of its variants were: André Bergeron, who settled in Quebec from Charente-Maritime in 1666; Jacques Bergeron, who arrived in Quebec from Guyenne in 1676; Francois Bergeron,who arrived in Quebec from Poitou in 1676. Barthélemy Bergeron d'Amboise came to Quebec in 1684 but settled in Acadia by 1695.


quot bringing'

language. Gradually, a linguistic transfer towards French occurred, leading to the linguistic unification of all the ethnic groups coming from France. At the Benedictine abbey of Charroux (Charroux Abbey) in La Marche on the borders of the Aquitaine "a great crowd of many people (''populus'') gathered there from the Poitou, the Limousin (Limousin (province)), and neighboring regions. Many bodies of saints were also brought there&quot; bringing miracles in their wake. ref>


renaud

was optimistic, as he had successfully built up alliances with the Emperor Otto IV (Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor), Count Renaud of Boulogne (Renaud I, Count of Dammartin) and Count Ferdinand of Flanders (Ferdinand, Count of Flanders). Barlow, Frank. (1999) ''

;resnum 1&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA The Feudal Kingdom of England, 1042–1216. '' Harlow, UK: Pearson Education. ISBN 0582381177, p.335. John's plan was to split Philip's forces by pushing north-east from Poitou towards Paris, whilst Otto, Renaud and Ferdinand, supported by William Longespée (William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury), marched south-west from Flanders. Carpenter, David. (2004) ''


life history

He died in 1369 at Fontenay-le-Comte, where he had gone to reside, and was buried at Poitiers. Michael Jones, ‘Audley, Sir James (c.1318–1369)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Oct 2005 accessed 1 March 2009 A curious shield of the revolt seems to bear a sort of official use of owls (also the emblem of Minerva) in representing the Chouannerie. It bore the arms of France, ''right'', Three fleurs de lys. ref


created great

, and remarked in ''Catholic Encyclopedia'', ''s.v.'' "Louis XIV: Louis XIV and Protestants"; Musée virtuel du protestantisme français" les draghonnades. thumb right 125px Coat of Arms of William de Valence before he became Earl of Pembroke (Image:Blason Guillaume de Valence.svg) The French conquest of Poitou in 1246 created great difficulties for William's family, and so

Poitou

'''Poitou''' ( ) was a province (Provinces of France) of west-central France whose capital city was Poitiers.

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