Podgorica

What is Podgorica known for?


impressive career

1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang


important sports

. FK Dečić (Tuzi), FK Kom and FK Mladost (FK Mladost Podgorica). One of the most popular clubs from the suburbs is FK Ribnica from Konik (Konik, Montenegro). The volleyball team OK Budućnost Podgorica and the women's handball team ŽRK Budućnost T-Mobile have had significant success in European competition. Budućnost Podgorica is the most important sports club in Podgorica. Its name means ''Future''. Chess is another popular sport and some famous global chess players, like Slavko Dedić, are born in Podgorica. Sporting events like the annual Podgorica Marathon and the ''Morača River'' jumps attract international competitors. Podgorica was the host of 2009 FINA Men's Water Polo World League. Venues thumb Podgorica City Stadium (File:PGStadium.jpg) Podgorica has a number of sporting venues; some are under reconstruction and expansion. The main ones are: *Podgorica City Stadium. When the eastern stand is completed, it will have a capacity of 24,000. It is the home of FK Budućnost Podgorica and the Montenegro national football team. It is currently the only venue in Montenegro that complies with FIFA standards for international football matches. *Morača Sports Center, a multi functional indoor sport facility. It has a capacity of 4,200 seats. It hosted one group of Eurobasket 2005, while other games were played in Belgrade (Belgrade Arena), Vršac (Millennium Center), and Novi Sad (Spens Sports Center). Almost every football club in Podgorica has its own stadium, although these are often only fields with small stands or no stands at all. Other notable venues are the Stadion malih sportova under Gorica hill and the sport shooting range under Ljubović hill. There are many other sports facilities around the city, most notably indoor soccer fields. Economy thumb Central Bank of Montenegro (File:Podgorica National bank of Montenegro.JPG) Podgorica is not only the administrative centre of Montenegro but also its main economic engine. Most of Montenegro's industrial, financial, and commercial base is in Podgorica. Before World War I, most of Podgorica's economy was in trade and small-scale manufacture – an economic model established during the long rule of the Ottoman Empire. After World War II, Podgorica became Montenegro's capital and a focus of the rapid urbanization and industrialization of the Yugoslav era (SFRY). Industries such as aluminium and tobacco processing, textiles (textile industry), engineering, vehicle production, and industrialized wine production were established in and around the city. In 1981, Podgorica's GDP per capita was 87% of the Yugoslav average. WikiPedia:Podgorica Commons:Category:Podgorica Dmoz:Regional Europe Montenegro Localities Podgorica


images international

; Stockholm (Sweden) Gallery File:TrgRepublike.jpg Republic Square (Republic Square (Podgorica)) File:Toranj na Dajbabskoj Gori.JPG


main contemporary

typical of Eastern bloc countries. All that part of the city on the right bank of the Morača River was built this way. Even the empty spaces in the city centre were filled with near-brutalist structures, resulting in an unfortunate fusion of old and new. The residential and business blocks of the SFRY era provided ample housing but have been much criticized for their uninventive and grey appearance. The main contemporary traffic arteries were laid


significant commercial

significant commercial company. World War I marked the end of dynamic development for Podgorica, by then the largest city in the newly proclaimed Kingdom of Montenegro. Podgorica was occupied, as was the rest of the country, by Austria-Hungary from 1916 to 1918. After the liberation by the allies (Allies of World War I) in 1918, a controversial Podgorica Assembly was held at Podgorica Tobacco Monopoly building. The assembly marked the end of Montenegrin statehood, as Montenegro


prominent family

WikiPedia:Podgorica Commons:Category:Podgorica Dmoz:Regional Europe Montenegro Localities Podgorica


including social

a hunger strike. These early successes convinced other groups, including Social Democrats in Slovenia, to join the party. The Zeta River Valley, or Bjelopavlići plain, merges in the southeast with the second significant flat lowland in Montenegro, the Zeta plain. Zeta plain stretches north of the Lake Scutari at elevation of WikiPedia:Podgorica Commons:Category:Podgorica Dmoz:Regional Europe Montenegro Localities Podgorica


free art

. The magazines and a web site called "Free Art Campaign" report that the artist has been arrested by the Serbian authorities for his performances, which are meant to offer a scathing meditation on the hyperreality and media representation of the Yugoslav Wars. On April 30, 1999 the Free Art Campaign announces that Maver has been found dead in a prison cell in Podgorica, Kosovo. In March 2000, after alternative art spaces such as Kapelica Gallery in Ljubljana, Forte


friendly people

alt url email address Slobode lat 42.44124 long 19.26300 directions next to Hercegovačka street phone hours price content the central square of the city, a lot of life at the end of the day, when people finish to work. Lot of cheap restaurants and friendly people, a pleasant place to spend the first part of the evening. *


significant cultural

. A significant cultural institution of over fifty years' standing is the Budo Tomović Cultural-Informational Centre (''KIC Budo Tomović''). It is a public institution which organizes various artistic events, including Podgorica Cultural Summer (''Podgoričko Kulturno Ljeto''), FIAT – International Alternative Theatre Festival (''Festival Internacionalnog Alternativnog Teatra''), DEUS – December Arts Scene (''Decembarska Umjetnička Scena''). KIC Budo Tomović was a host for such names as Tony Parsons (Tony Parsons (British journalist)) or Brooklyn Funk Essentials during their visits to Podgorica. Media thumb left Dajbabska Gora Tower The radio frequency spectrum control tower (File:Radio tower Podgorica.jpg), overlooking the city Podgorica is undoubtedly the media hub of Montenegro. It is home to the headquarters of the state-owned public television broadcaster RTCG. Commercial broadcasters in Podgorica include TV In, NTV Montena, Elmag RTV, RTV Atlas, TV Vijesti and MBC (Montenegro Broadcast Company). It was announced that cities local television will be open soon. Mugoša: Podgorica dobija svoju televiziju Their programmes can be received in much of Montenegro. All Montenegro's daily newspapers (oldest Montenegrin daily newspaper ''Pobjeda'', ''Vijesti'', ''Dnevne Novine'' and ''Dan (Dan (newspaper))'') are published in Podgorica, as is the popular weekly magazine ''Monitor (The Monitor (Montenegro))''. Sports thumb Morača Sports Center (File:Morača Sports Center.jpg) The most popular sports by far are football (association football) and basketball. Basketball became especially popular with the success in the late 20th and early 21st centuries of KK Budućnost Podgorica, both in Yugoslav (FRY) and European competitions. Football in Podgorica has a long tradition associated with FK Budućnost Podgorica. World-famous players Predrag Mijatović and Dejan Savićević were born in Podgorica and made their debut in that team. FK Zeta (from the Podgorica suburb of Golubovci) has also reached the former first league of Serbia and Montenegro. These clubs, along with FK Mogren of Budva, usually compete with each other for leading position in the First League of Montenegro. Other clubs from Podgorica and its surroundings play in the Montenegrin First League e.g. FK Dečić (Tuzi), FK Kom and FK Mladost (FK Mladost Podgorica). One of the most popular clubs from the suburbs is FK Ribnica from Konik (Konik, Montenegro). The volleyball team OK Budućnost Podgorica and the women's handball team ŽRK Budućnost T-Mobile have had significant success in European competition. Budućnost Podgorica is the most important sports club in Podgorica. Its name means ''Future''. Chess is another popular sport and some famous global chess players, like Slavko Dedić, are born in Podgorica. Sporting events like the annual Podgorica Marathon and the ''Morača River'' jumps attract international competitors. Podgorica was the host of 2009 FINA Men's Water Polo World League. Venues thumb Podgorica City Stadium (File:PGStadium.jpg) Podgorica has a number of sporting venues; some are under reconstruction and expansion. The main ones are: *Podgorica City Stadium. When the eastern stand is completed, it will have a capacity of 24,000. It is the home of FK Budućnost Podgorica and the Montenegro national football team. It is currently the only venue in Montenegro that complies with FIFA standards for international football matches. *Morača Sports Center, a multi functional indoor sport facility. It has a capacity of 4,200 seats. It hosted one group of Eurobasket 2005, while other games were played in Belgrade (Belgrade Arena), Vršac (Millennium Center), and Novi Sad (Spens Sports Center). Almost every football club in Podgorica has its own stadium, although these are often only fields with small stands or no stands at all. Other notable venues are the Stadion malih sportova under Gorica hill and the sport shooting range under Ljubović hill. There are many other sports facilities around the city, most notably indoor soccer fields. Economy thumb Central Bank of Montenegro (File:Podgorica National bank of Montenegro.JPG) Podgorica is not only the administrative centre of Montenegro but also its main economic engine. Most of Montenegro's industrial, financial, and commercial base is in Podgorica. Before World War I, most of Podgorica's economy was in trade and small-scale manufacture – an economic model established during the long rule of the Ottoman Empire. After World War II, Podgorica became Montenegro's capital and a focus of the rapid urbanization and industrialization of the Yugoslav era (SFRY). Industries such as aluminium and tobacco processing, textiles (textile industry), engineering, vehicle production, and industrialized wine production were established in and around the city. In 1981, Podgorica's GDP per capita was 87% of the Yugoslav average. WikiPedia:Podgorica Commons:Category:Podgorica Dmoz:Regional Europe Montenegro Localities Podgorica

Podgorica

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