Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

What is Pine Ridge Indian Reservation known for?


making quot

for the Wounded Knee Creek which runs through the region. The bones and heart of the Sioux chief Crazy Horse were reputedly buried along this creek by his family following his death in 1877. The town lies within the Pine Ridge Reservation (Pine Ridge Indian Reservation), occupied by the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). Big Foot (Spotted Elk), also known as Spotted Elk, was a Miniconjou leader on the U.S. Army's list of "trouble-making" Indians. He was stopped while ''en


film career

North Carolina and a Lakota AIM member were shot and killed. The elders ended the occupation then. Film career Trudell created a career as an actor, performing in roles in ''Thunderheart'' (1992), ''On Deadly Ground'' (1995) and ''Smoke Signals (Smoke Signals (film))'' (1998) (as the Radio speaker Randy Peone on K-REZ radio Joanna Hearne. 2005. John Wayne's Teeth: Speech, Sound and Representation in "Smoke Signals


life stories

Richard Wilson . She also covers aspects of the role of the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the treatment of the Native Americans and their children in the mid-1900s. Her work focuses on themes of gender, identity, and race. Petrillo, Larissa. (1996). ''The life stories of a woman from Rosebud: Names and naming in 'Lakota Woman' and 'Ohitika Woman''' (M.A. thesis) Wilfrid Laurier University thumb left ''From a Native Son (File:FromaNativeSon.jpg)'' book cover Churchill's ''Indians Are Us?'' (1994), a sequel to ''Fantasies of the Master Race'', further explores American Indian (Native Americans in the United States) issues in popular culture and politics. He examines the movie ''Black Robe (Black Robe (film)),'' the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation killings, the prosecution of Leonard Peltier, sports mascots, the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, and blood quantum laws, calling them tools of genocide. Churchill is particularly outspoken about New Age exploitations of shamanism and American Indian sacred traditions, and the "do-it-yourself Indianism" of certain contemporary authors. John P. LaVelle of the University of New Mexico School of Law published a review of ''Indians Are Us?'' in ''The American Indian Quarterly''. Professor LaVelle, an enrolled member of the Santee Sioux Nation (Lakota people), states that ''Indians Are Us?'' twists historical facts and is hostile toward Indian tribes. The '''Wounded Knee incident''' began February 27, 1973 when about 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The grassroots protest followed the failure of their effort to impeach the elected tribal president Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents; they also protested the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Indian peoples and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations. Occupation On February 27, AIM leaders Russell Means (Oglala Sioux) and Carter Camp (Ponca), together with 200 activists and Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux) of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation who opposed Oglala tribal chairman Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), occupied the town of Wounded Knee in protest against Wilson's administration, as well as against the federal government's persistent failures to honor its treaties with Native American nations. The U.S. government law enforcement, including FBI agents, surrounded Wounded Knee the same day with armed reinforcements. They gradually gained more arms. "Wounded Knee Incident." United States Marshals Service. Retrieved May 10, 2007. The video is focused on the case for Leonard Peltier, who was one of the leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The band is performing live in a small venue throughout the video. During the video, footage from the Peltier case is examined and detailed with shots of Peltier and other members of AIM. There is also a reenactment of what took place on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The footage of this reenactment is from Michael Apted's 1992 documentary ''Incident at Oglala''. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Despite those rejections, Archer said that the Pine Ridge Reservation (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)'s council may "consider the proposal." A representative for the Standing Rock Reservation (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation)'s council has said that that reservation is also considering Lakotah Oyate's proposal. Lakotah Oyate have also been holding discussions with "about 150" other indigenous organizations in the U.S. and mentioned particularly the Native Hawaiians (w:Native Hawaiians).


site title

occurred on December 29, 1890, near Wounded Knee Creek (Lakota (Lakota language): ''Cankpe Opi Wakpala''). On the day before, a detachment of the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment (7th Cavalry Regiment (United States)) commanded by Major Samuel Whitside Samuel M

''' happened on December 29, 1890, near Wounded Knee Creek (Lakota (Lakota language): ''Čhaŋkpé Ópi Wakpála'') on the Lakota (Lakota people) Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, USA. On the day before, a detachment of the 7th Cavalry Regiment


political actions

the Minnesota or Black Hills War. The Alcatraz occupation inspired numerous other political actions by American Indian activists: the seizure of the Mayflower II in Boston on Thanksgiving Day 1970; the Indian occupation of Mount Rushmore; the Trail of Broken Treaties in 1972, ending in Indian occupation of the Department of Interior headquarters in Washington, DC; the Wounded Knee Incident at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1973, in which Oglala Lakota held territory

reservation to the east within the boundaries of South Dakota. As a branch of the U.S. government with personnel on Indian reservations, BIA police were involved in political actions such as: the occupation of BIA headquarters in Washington, D.C. in 1972; the Wounded Knee Incident of 1973, where activists at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation occupied land for more than two months; The '''Wounded Knee incident''' began February 27, 1973 when about 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The grassroots protest followed the failure of their effort to impeach the elected tribal president Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents; they also protested the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Indian peoples and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations. Occupation On February 27, AIM leaders Russell Means (Oglala Sioux) and Carter Camp (Ponca), together with 200 activists and Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux) of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation who opposed Oglala tribal chairman Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), occupied the town of Wounded Knee in protest against Wilson's administration, as well as against the federal government's persistent failures to honor its treaties with Native American nations. The U.S. government law enforcement, including FBI agents, surrounded Wounded Knee the same day with armed reinforcements. They gradually gained more arms. "Wounded Knee Incident." United States Marshals Service. Retrieved May 10, 2007. The video is focused on the case for Leonard Peltier, who was one of the leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The band is performing live in a small venue throughout the video. During the video, footage from the Peltier case is examined and detailed with shots of Peltier and other members of AIM. There is also a reenactment of what took place on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The footage of this reenactment is from Michael Apted's 1992 documentary ''Incident at Oglala''. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Despite those rejections, Archer said that the Pine Ridge Reservation (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)'s council may "consider the proposal." A representative for the Standing Rock Reservation (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation)'s council has said that that reservation is also considering Lakotah Oyate's proposal. Lakotah Oyate have also been holding discussions with "about 150" other indigenous organizations in the U.S. and mentioned particularly the Native Hawaiians (w:Native Hawaiians).


biography film

; Russell Means biography, Film Reference Website He was baptized ''Oyate Wacinyapin'', which means "works for the people" in the Lakota language. His Oglala Sioux (Oglala Lakota) parents met as students at an Indian boarding school. Means starred in ''Pathfinder (Pathfinder (2007 film))'', a 2007 movie about Vikings' battling Native Americans in the New World


movie black

Laurier University thumb left ''From a Native Son (File:FromaNativeSon.jpg)'' book cover Churchill's ''Indians Are Us?'' (1994), a sequel to ''Fantasies of the Master Race'', further explores American Indian (Native Americans in the United States) issues in popular culture and politics. He examines the movie ''Black Robe (Black Robe (film)),'' the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation killings, the prosecution of Leonard Peltier, sports mascots, the Indian Arts


species growing

both ankle-high and waist-high grasses, and fills a transitional zone between the moister tall-grass prairie to the east and the more arid short-grass prairie to the west. Biologists have identified more than 400 different plant species growing in Badlands National Park. Each plant species is adapted to survive the conditions prevalent in the mixed-grass prairie ecosystem. The climate here is one of extremes: hot, cold, dry, windy and stormy with blizzards, floods, droughts, and fires. Grasses


centuries traditional

1871 sqmi 1 , of which The '''Wounded Knee incident''' began February 27, 1973 when about 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The grassroots protest followed the failure of their effort to impeach the elected tribal president Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents; they also protested the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Indian peoples and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations. Occupation On February 27, AIM leaders Russell Means (Oglala Sioux) and Carter Camp (Ponca), together with 200 activists and Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux) of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation who opposed Oglala tribal chairman Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), occupied the town of Wounded Knee in protest against Wilson's administration, as well as against the federal government's persistent failures to honor its treaties with Native American nations. The U.S. government law enforcement, including FBI agents, surrounded Wounded Knee the same day with armed reinforcements. They gradually gained more arms. "Wounded Knee Incident." United States Marshals Service. Retrieved May 10, 2007. The video is focused on the case for Leonard Peltier, who was one of the leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The band is performing live in a small venue throughout the video. During the video, footage from the Peltier case is examined and detailed with shots of Peltier and other members of AIM. There is also a reenactment of what took place on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The footage of this reenactment is from Michael Apted's 1992 documentary ''Incident at Oglala''. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Despite those rejections, Archer said that the Pine Ridge Reservation (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)'s council may "consider the proposal." A representative for the Standing Rock Reservation (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation)'s council has said that that reservation is also considering Lakotah Oyate's proposal. Lakotah Oyate have also been holding discussions with "about 150" other indigenous organizations in the U.S. and mentioned particularly the Native Hawaiians (w:Native Hawaiians).


public attention

Knee on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1973. Other events during the 1970s were designed to achieve the goal of gaining public attention. They ensured AIM would be noticed to highlight what they saw as the erosion of Indian rights and sovereignty. Banks, pp. 108-113; Leonard Crow Dog; Richard Erdoes. ''Crow Dog: Four Generations of Sioux Medicine Men'' (New York: Harper Perennial, 1996), pp. 170-171 ISBN 978-0-06-092682-3 ref name "Crow Dog and Erdoes

the goal of gaining public attention. They ensured AIM would be noticed to highlight what they saw as the erosion of Indian rights and sovereignty. Banks, pp. 108-113; Leonard Crow Dog; Richard Erdoes. ''Crow Dog: Four Generations of Sioux Medicine Men'' (New York: Harper Perennial, 1996), pp. 170-171 ISBN 978-0-06-092682-3 Mary Crow Dog; Richard Erdoes. ''Lakota Woman'' (New York: HarperPerennial, 1990) p. 88 ISBN 978-0-06

Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

The '''Pine Ridge Indian Reservation''' ('''''Wazí Aháŋhaŋ Oyáŋke''''' in Lakota (Lakota language), also called '''Pine Ridge Agency''') is an Oglala Lakota Native American (Native Americans in the United States) reservation (Indian reservation) located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. Originally included within the territory of the Great Sioux Reservation, Pine Ridge was established in 1889 in the southwest corner of South Dakota on the Nebraska border. Today it consists of 3,468.85 sq mi (8,984.306 km 2 ) of land area and is the eighth-largest reservation in the United States, larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

The reservation encompasses the entirety of Shannon County (Shannon County, South Dakota), the southern half of Jackson County (Jackson County, South Dakota) and the northwest portion of Bennett County (Bennett County, South Dakota). Of the 3,143 counties in the United States, these are among the poorest (Lowest-income counties in the United States). Only of land are suitable for agriculture. Extensive off-reservation trust lands are held mostly scattered throughout Bennett County (all of Bennett County was part of Pine Ridge until May 1910), Paul Prucha: ''Atlas of American Indian Affairs'', p. 110) "Historical Allotment Legislation", Indiana Government and also extend into adjacent Pine Ridge (Whiteclay), Nebraska (Whiteclay, Nebraska) in Sheridan County (Sheridan County, Nebraska), just south of the community of Pine Ridge, South Dakota, the administrative center and largest community within the reservation. The 2000 census (United States Census, 2000) population of the reservation was 15,521; but a study conducted by Colorado State University and accepted by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development has estimated the resident population to reach 28,787. "Indian Housing Block Grant Formula", U.S. Housing and Urban Development

Pine Ridge is the site of several events that marked tragic milestones in the history between the Sioux of the area and the United States (U.S.) government. Stronghold Table—a mesa in what is today the Oglala-administered portion of Badlands National Park—was the location of the last of the Ghost Dances. The U.S. authorities' attempt to repress this movement eventually led to the Wounded Knee Massacre on December 29, 1890. A mixed band of Miniconjou Lakota and Hunkpapa Sioux, led by Chief Spotted Elk (Spotted Elk), sought sanctuary at Pine Ridge after fleeing the Standing Rock Agency, where Sitting Bull had been killed during efforts to arrest him. The families were intercepted by a heavily armed detachment of the Seventh Cavalry, which attacked them, killing many women and children as well as warriors. This was the last large engagement between U.S. forces and Native Americans (Indigenous peoples of the Americas) and marked the end of the western frontier.

Changes accumulated in the last quarter of the 20th century; in 1971 the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) started Oglala Lakota College, a tribal college (Tribal colleges and universities), which offers 4-year degrees. In 1973 decades of discontent at the Pine Ridge Reservation resulted in a grassroots protest that escalated into the Wounded Knee Incident, gaining national attention. Members of the Oglala Lakota, the American Indian Movement, and supporters occupied the town in defiance of federal and state law enforcement in a protest that turned into an armed standoff lasting 71 days. This event inspired American Indians across the country and gradually led to changes at the reservation, with a revival of some cultural traditions. In 1981 the Lakota Tim Giago started the ''Lakota Times'' at Pine Ridge, the first independent Native American newspaper in the nation, which he published until selling it in 1998.

At the southern end of the Badlands, the reservation is part of the mixed grass prairie, an ecological transition zone between the short-grass and tall-grass prairies; all are part of the Great Plains. A great variety of plant and animal life flourishes on and adjacent to the reservation, including the endangered black-footed ferret. The area is also important in the field of paleontology; it contains deposits of Pierre Shale formed on the seafloor of the Western Interior Seaway, evidence of the marine Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary), and one of the largest deposits of fossils of extinct mammals from the Oligocene epoch (Oligocene).

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