Peterborough

What is Peterborough known for?


quot running'

and Manchester, 20 December 2002. In May 2004, groups of young Pakistani men clashed with Afghan (Demographics of Afghanistan) and Iraqi (Iraqi people) asylum seekers in the multicultural Millfield (Millfield, Peterborough) area of the city. In the "running street battles," houses and cars were set alight and windows were smashed. "Patrols to quell violent clashes", ''BBC News Online


stage film

Peterborough, England genre Pop (pop music), stage (theatre), screen (film) Biography Nicholas was born as '''Paul Oscar Beuselinck''' in Peterborough, England. His grandfather — who originated from Belgium — had been a chef in the merchant navy during World War II, before becoming Head Chef on The Union-Castle Line ships between England and South Africa. His maternal grandfather was a London docker. DATE OF BIRTH 3 December


driving home

Pardesiya, Israel * 25px (Image:Flag of the United Kingdom.svg) Peterborough, United Kingdom He was born at Peakirk near Peterborough in Northamptonshire, and died at Milton (Milton, Northamptonshire) in the same county. He lived a very retired life, and saw little or nothing of society; when he did mingle in it, his dogmatism and pugnacity caused him to be generally shunned. In February 1982 Jones was involved in a serious car accident while driving home after a gig at Glossop Folk Club. Jones' car ran into a lorry pulling out of "Whittlesea brickworks" on the road between Peterborough and March (March, Cambridgeshire) in Cambridgeshire. He suffered very serious injuries, including many broken bones and brain damage, and required intensive care treatment and hospitalisation for a total of eight months. Jones's injuries left him with permanent physical co-ordination problems and unable to play the guitar as well as before – he could also no longer play the fiddle at all. The accident effectively ended his career as a touring and recording professional musician. Mike Raven: ''Nic Jones'' ("Living Tradition - May June 1997). There is some direct evidence for the text's popularity in tenth-century England. Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester is known to have donated a copy to the Peterborough house. Sawyer no. 1448. See Michael Lapidge, "Surviving booklists in Anglo-Saxon England." ''Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts. Basic Readings'', ed. Mary P. Richards. London, 1994. 87-167: 117-9. Ælfric of Eynsham drew on a version included in Abbo of Fleury's ''Collectio canonum'' for his Old English treatise ''De octo vitiis et de duodecim abusivis gradus'', in which the section on the ''rex iniquus'' was translated whole. Andy Bell originates from the Dogsthorpe area in Peterborough. His family still resides in the city and surrounding areas such as Market Deeping. Life He was the son of the Rev. Theophilus Hill and is said to have been born in Peterborough. He was apprenticed to an apothecary and on the completion of his apprenticeship he set up in a small shop in St Martin's Lane, Westminster (City of Westminster). He also travelled over the country in search of rare herbs, with a view to publishing a ''hortus siccus'', but the plan failed. Units continued to be used on these services until 1997, when they became common-user with the rest of the WAGN fleet. After this, it was common for units to turn up on London King's Cross to Peterborough services. Four of the five units were subsequently hired to North Western Trains, and two were painted in the company blue livery with gold stars. The other two units were frequently interchanged with the one remaining WAGN unit, and so were not repainted. Founded at the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1541 (it was until then part of the Diocese of Lincoln), the Diocese has parishes in: *The Soke of Peterborough (the parts of Peterborough to the south of the River Nene, formerly in the historic county (historic counties of England) of Huntingdonshire, are within the Diocese of Ely — however, these parishes were placed under the pastoral care of the Bishop of Peterborough, acting as an Assistant Bishop in the Diocese of Ely. WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


successful drawing

. In 1798 he exhibited a highly regarded sketch of Peterborough Cathedral at the Royal Academy and became a regular exhibitor at the RA until the foundation of the ''Old Watercolour Society (Royal Watercolour Society)'' in 1805. As one of the founders of the OWS Varley exhibited largely there, over 700 drawings. He also became a highly successful drawing master with pupils including Copley Fielding, David Cox (David Cox (artist)), John Linnell (John Linnell (painter)) and Turner of Oxford. Despite his success he was constantly in financial difficulties, "since he was both a hopeless businessman and by temperament something of a Micawber". (Mallalieu). Varley was particularly skilled at the laying of flat washes of watercolour which suited the placid, contemplative mood that he often sought to evoke. thumb left Church Street (former A15) (Image:Market Deeping - Church Street - geograph.org.uk - 672554.jpg) It is the second largest of The Deepings and its eponymous market has been held since at least 1220. The river here forms the Lincolnshire Cambridgeshire border with Peterborough about 8 miles away. Situated at the southern extremity of Lincolnshire, the town forms part of the border with the Peterborough City Council (Unitary Authority). thumb left Church Street (former A15) (Image:Market Deeping - Church Street - geograph.org.uk - 672554.jpg) It is the second largest of The Deepings and its eponymous market has been held since at least 1220. The river here forms the Lincolnshire Cambridgeshire border with Peterborough about 8 miles away. Situated at the southern extremity of Lincolnshire, the town forms part of the border with the Peterborough City Council (Unitary Authority). He built many bridges in his career, most of them being in South America, Australia and India. One example of his work is to be found in Peterborough, where his cast iron bridge, which today carries the East Coast Main Line railway over the River Nene, was built in 1847. Apart from some minor repairs and strengthening in 1910 (the steel bands and cross braces around the fluted legs to help carry increased train weights) it remains just the way he built it. It is now a unique "listed structure" - the only cast iron bridge in the UK carrying a high-speed train line. thumb East Coast Main Line bridge by Cubitt, in the background. (File:Railway bridges over the River Nene - geograph.org.uk - 465161.jpg) History The Diocese of East Anglia (Roman Catholic Diocese of East Anglia) covers an area of WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


vast local

, increasingly developed as a regional hub. Brooks, John A Flavour of the Welland (p.12) The Welland Partnership and Jarrold Publishing, Norwich, 2004. thumb right Burghley House (File:Front of Burghley House 2009.jpg) (1555–1587), seat of the Marquess of Exeter, hereditary Lord Paramount of Peterborough Coupled with vast local clay deposits, the railway enabled


work selling

failed and the family moved to London. His father died in 1872 and Royce had to go out to work selling newspapers and delivering telegrams, having had only one year of formal schooling. '''Eye''' is a village in the unitary authority area of Peterborough in England, south of Crowland and Eye Green. It was formerly in the Soke of Peterborough in Northamptonshire. '''Eye Green''' is a village in the unitary authority of Peterborough in England. It lies north of Eye (Eye, Peterborough) and south of Crowland. The airport does not have its own railway station. The nearest station is WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


local landscape

Green Wheel is a 50-mile (80 km) network of cycleways, footpaths and bridleways which provide safe, continuous routes around the city with radiating spokes connecting to the city centre. The project has also created a sculpture trail, which provides functional, landscape artworks along the Green Wheel route and a Living Landmarks project involving the local community in the creation of local landscape features such as mini woodlands, ponds and hedgerows. "Cycle Guide: The Green Wheel", ''The Guardian'', London and Manchester, 3 March 2007. Another long-distance footpath, the Hereward Way, runs from Oakham in Rutland, through Peterborough, to East Harling in Norfolk. Demographics Population Peterborough has an estimated population of WikiPedia:Peterborough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cambridgeshire Peterborough Commons:Category:Peterborough


term friendship

Town twinning started in Europe after the Second World War. Its purpose was to promote friendship and greater understanding between the people of different European cities. A twinning link is a formal, long-term friendship agreement involving co-operation between two communities in different countries and endorsed by both local authorities. The two communities organise projects and activities around a range of issues and develop an understanding of historical, cultural, lifestyle similarities


genre play

accessdate July 18, 2011 issue 2 Sweden-based ''Datormagazin'' s Ingela Palmér stated that the Amiga version differed little from the Commodore 64 one, and that those who already have the latter need not get the Amiga version. She added that, while the graphics and gameplay were not the best, ''Maniac Mansion'' remained highly enjoyable and easy. Palmér recommended that people new to the genre play this game first.


career designing

to pursue a career designing crop circles in Peru. birth_date Early life Henshaw was born in Peterborough, the eldest son of a wealthy Lincolnshire family. He was educated at King Edward VI Grammar School (King Edward VI School Stratford-upon-Avon), Stratford-on-Avon ("Shakespeare's School" where he sat at the bard's desk), ref

Peterborough

'''Peterborough''' ( to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. The unitary authority borders Northamptonshire and Rutland to the west, Lincolnshire to the north, and non-metropolitan Cambridgeshire to the south and east.

The local topography is flat and low-lying, and in some places lies below sea level, for example in the Fens that lie to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre also with evidence of Roman (Ancient Rome) occupation. The Anglo-Saxon (History of Anglo-Saxon England) period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral. Peterborough was until 1965 part of Northamptonshire, although the city with its surrounding rural area was from medieval times administered separately as the Soke of Peterborough.

The population grew rapidly following the arrival of the railways in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly noted for its brick manufacture. Following the Second World War (World War II), growth was limited until designation as a New Town (New towns in the United Kingdom) in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is underway. In common with much of the United Kingdom, industrial employment has fallen, with a significant proportion of new jobs in financial services and distribution.

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