Paraguay

What is Paraguay known for?


life growing

accessdate 14 August 2011 language Spanish Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay


prominent religious

indigenous religions. A U.S. State Department report on Religious Freedom names Roman Catholicism, evangelical Protestantism, mainline Protestantism, Judaism (Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform), Mormonism, and the Baha'i Faith as prominent religious groups. It also mentions a large Muslim community in Alto Paraná (as a result of Middle-Eastern immigration, especially from Lebanon) and a prominent Mennonite community in Boquerón. Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay


design site

Nations development program. Further in 1959 he received the Order of the Lion of Finland's "Pro-Finlandia medal." Finnish design site He did much of his work for universities, schools, and also did a "Root Table" for the Finnish army. Art in Review, The New York Times Furniture designs based on his


quot bold

a white collar pattern on their fur, but Greggary is part of a "bold new breed" of peccary that also has a wide tie below his collar, distinguishing it as a particularly exceptional swine. Corrientes again Knowing that Rosas intended to annex Paraguay as a province (provinces of Argentina) of the Confederation, Paraguayan governor Carlos Antonio López signed with Madariaga and Paz on November 11, 1845 a treaty (''Tratado de Alianza y Convicción Adicional''). Together


philanthropic work

achievements and his philanthropic work on behalf of young people through the Steve Nash Foundation. NBA star Steve Nash gets honourary degree for his on and off-court performance, timescolonist.com, 18 September 2009, accessed 18 September 2009. The various trees known as ''algarrobo'' in Latin America (''Albizia saman'' in Cuba and four species


matches drawing

Libertadores , Internacional started poorly; they managed to progress to the Round of 16 but only after finishing third in their group, winning only two matches, drawing once and losing three. However, that would change in the knockout stages as Inter defeated five-times Libertadores winners Peñarol (C.A. Peñarol) 1-2 in Montevideo and 6-2 in Porto Alegre. The quarterfinals saw the team face off against Brazilian champions Bahia in a rematch of the Brasileirao finals they disputed a few months earlier; this time, Internacional beat Bahia 1-0 at home and ground out a 0-0 draw to progress to the semifinals and exact revenge on the ''tricolor de aço''. The semifinals had Internacional face off against a tough opponent: Olimpia (Olimpia Asunción), who were the reigning champions of Paraguay. Olimpia, who were winners of the 1979 Copa Libertadores, were blossoming in their second golden era with players such as Ever Hugo Almeida, Gabriel González (Gabriel González (footballer)), Adriano Samaniego, and star Raul Vicente Amarilla, all coached by legend Luis Cubilla. The first match took place in Asunción; Inter managed to win 0-1 and were full of confidence in the return leg back home. However, Olimpia managed a spirited comeback and won the return leg 2-3 silencing the ''torcidas'' at the Beira-Rio. Inter even had a penalty kick in their favor, which was failed to convert into goal. Since the aggregate was tied at 3-3, a penalty shootout ensued to decide the finalist, and Olimpia won 3-5, eliminating the ''Colorados''. This elimination has been dubbed by fans as "O desastre do Beira-Rio". *As most of ancestors of Hispanic Americans came from Latin America, z and c (before e and i ) are pronounced (Seseo) as Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay


title singles

; '''Ramón Delgado''' (born November 14, 1976 in Asunción, Paraguay) is a tennis player from Paraguay, who turned professional in 1995. At the 1998 French Open, he defeated Pete Sampras in the second round. He has not won a single title (singles and or doubles) during his career so far. The right-hander reached his highest individual ranking on the ATP Tour on April 26, 1999, when he became the number 52 of the world. As of July 12, 2010, he is ranked 135th in the ATP rankings. He also nearly qualified for the 2006 Wimbledon Championships, but was defeated in the third, and final, qualifying round by Roko Karanušić. '''Ramón Delgado''' (born November 14, 1976 in Asunción, Paraguay) is a tennis player from Paraguay, who turned professional in 1995. At the 1998 French Open, he defeated Pete Sampras in the second round. He has not won a single title (singles and or doubles) during his career so far. The right-hander reached his highest individual ranking on the ATP Tour on April 26, 1999, when he became the number 52 of the world. As of July 12, 2010, he is ranked 135th in the ATP rankings. He also nearly qualified for the 2006 Wimbledon Championships, but was defeated in the third, and final, qualifying round by Roko Karanušić. He returned to Brazil in 1840, entering at the Brazilian Historic and Geographic Institute in 1841. In 1844 he obtained Brazilian citizenship, and could apply to a diplomatic career. He would serve in Paraguay, Venezuela, the Republic of New Granada (nowadays Colombia), Ecuador, Chile (where he met his wife, Carmen Ovalle, marrying her in 1864), Peru and the Netherlands. He would publish the first volume of his masterpiece, ''História Geral do Brasil'', in 1854. Its second volume was published in 1857. '''Nicolás Leoz Almirón''' (born September 10, 1928 in Pirizal (Cyperaceae), Chaco Paraguayo (Chaco Department), Paraguay) is the current President of CONMEBOL (Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol, ''South American Football Confederation''). Leoz assumed the presidency in 1986 (succeeding Teófilo Salinas Fuller) and in February 2006, he was reelected as President for a sixth term. He is Paraguayan and he received Colombian citizenship (Colombian nationality law) in 2008. '''Nicolás Leoz Almirón''' (born September 10, 1928 in Pirizal (Cyperaceae), Chaco Paraguayo (Chaco Department), Paraguay) is the current President of CONMEBOL (Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol, ''South American Football Confederation''). Leoz assumed the presidency in 1986 (succeeding Teófilo Salinas Fuller) and in February 2006, he was reelected as President for a sixth term. He is Paraguayan and he received Colombian citizenship (Colombian nationality law) in 2008. Bishop '''Edmundo Mellid''' SDB (Salesians of Don Bosco) (born 1944) is a Roman Catholic missionary presently serving in Paraguay and Titular (Titular bishop) Bishop of Uzalis. On February 13, 2006 he was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI as Apostolic Vicar (Apostolic vicariate) to Chaco Paraguayo (Vicariate Apostolic of Chaco Paraguayo), an area with a population of 18,000 but only 5 ordained priests. As a result of this appointment, he was as consecrated to the episcopate 22 April 2006. Prior to this appointment, Mellid served as a high profile missionary in Angola. Mellid was ordained a priest of the Salesians of Don Bosco in 1977. Eintrag über Edmundo Ponziano Valenzuela Mellid auf ''catholic-hierarchy.org References Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay


distinctive rock

subdivision) Department of Central (Central Department). Probably the best feature of this Paraguayan town is its geographical location; it lays between a group of rolling hills with a distinctive rock formation (found only in 3 places in the world) and a beautiful blue lake, Ypacaraí lake (Ypacaraí Lake). The topography of the surroundings gives this town a unique natural charm. The colonial architecture, largely preserved, along with its original cobble stone streets makes this small town


rock scenes

of the Birds of the World'' , Cornell University Press, Ithaca Its diet consists of plants stems, seeds, leaves, and, rarely, small animals. It would help to revitalize rock movements in Mexico and Spain for two reasons: 1) It would create a buzz and excitement in the local rock scenes; 2) it proved to producers and record labels in those countries that "Rock en Español" could work and make them money. In Mexico, Argentine bands were being marketed by media giants like Televisa as "rock in your language". Remembering La Onda through the literature of José Agustín and La Onda roquera (rock’n’roll in México) by Roberto Avant-Mier Its success changed the landscape of the Mexican scene: it laid the groundwork for Mexican rock in Spanish to itself expand overseas. In Peru, the Argentine invasion was a catalyst that brought that country's own movement more to the mainstream. They Are Peruvian and they are good Peruvian Rock (Spanish). Archived 2009-10-25. In Chile, where a few outstanding bands existed even prior to the Argentine boom (see Los Prisioneros), the flood of rock music coming from their eastern neighbor would fully energize and inspire the local scene, and Argentine rock's influence continues to this day. Celestes, azules, blancos, rojos y amarillos Influence of Argentine Rock in Chile (Spanish)- by Mauricio Fredes The current boom in Colombian rock can be traced to the 1980s, with most Colombian rock acts citing the Argentine invasion groups as a direct influence. Rock y Pop www.Colombia.com (Spanish) In countries like Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia, the effects were even more profound. *Guyana – represented by Bharrat Jagdeo *Paraguay – Nicanor Duarte not attending *Peru – represented by Alejandro Toledo Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay


published books

Commons:Category:Paraguay WikiPedia:Paraguay Dmoz:Regional South America Paraguay

Paraguay

'''Paraguay''' (

The indigenous (indigenous people) Guaraní (Guarani people) had been living in Paraguay for at least a millennium before the Spanish (Spanish colonial empire) conquered the territory in the 16th century. Spanish settlers and Jesuit (Jesuits) missions (Reductions) introduced Christianity and Spanish culture to the region. Paraguay was on the periphery of Spain's colonial empire, with few urban centers and a sparse population. Following independence from Spain in 1811, Paraguay was ruled by a series of dictators who implemented isolationist (isolationism) and protectionist (protectionism) policies.

This development was truncated by the disastrous Paraguayan War (1864–1870), in which the country lost 60 to 70 percent of its population through war and disease, and about of territory to Argentina and Brazil. Through the 20th century, Paraguay continued to endure a succession of authoritarian governments, culminating in the regime of Alfredo Stroessner, who led South America's longest-lived military dictatorship from 1954 to 1989. He was toppled in an internal military coup, and free multi-party (multi-party system) elections were organized and held for the first time in 1993. A year later, Paraguay joined Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay to found Mercosur, a regional economic collaborative.

As of 2009, Paraguay's population was estimated to be at around 6.5 million, most of whom are concentrated in the southeast region of the country. The capital and largest city is Asunción, of which the metropolitan area is home to nearly a third of Paraguay's population. In contrast to most Latin American nations, Paraguay's indigenous language and culture, Guaraní, remains highly influential. In each census, residents predominantly identify as mestizo, reflecting years of intermarriage among the different ethnic groups. Guaraní (Paraguayan Guaraní) is recognized as an official language alongside Spanish, and both languages are widely spoken in the country, with around 92 percent of the general population speaking Spanish and 98 percent speaking Guaraní.

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