Panjakent

What is Panjakent known for?


depiction

as found from the wall painting from Penjikent on the river Zervashan. In this depiction, Shiva is portrayed with a sacred halo and a sacred thread ("Yajnopavita"). He is clad in tiger skin while his attendants are wearing Sodgian dress. In Eastern Turkestan in the Taklamakan Desert. There is a depiction of his four-legged seated cross-legged n a cushioned seat supported by two bulls. Geography Climate The Köppen Climate Classification sub-type


special emphasis

: Zeravshan Tourism Development Association - A network of small providers offering Community Based Tourism products with special emphasis on cultural and ecological sustainability. Supported by international development organisations. Excellent for arranging custom made tours and accommodation for the individual and group traveller. http: www.ztda-tourism.tj Pamir-Travel, one of the biggest and most experienced operators in Penjikent. http: www.travel-pamir.com (Nematov Niyozgul, Rudaki 22 16


main construction

lat long directions phone tollfree fax hours price US$5 content The archaeological site of the ruins of old Penjikent - a walled inter-city which stood 2500-years ago - was once a Sogdian trading city on the Silk Road. Today, only ruins are left owing to the fact that the main construction material was clay-bricks. Often referred to as ''The Pompeii of Central Asia'', it is well worth a visit. Duplicates of old Sogdian art are exposed in the nearby museum. The director will also take you on a tour, which will open your eyes to many interesting details which will normally escape the layman's eye. Ancient Panjakent was divided into a '''shakhrestan (residential quarter)''' covering an area of about 13 hectares, an '''ark (citadel)''' with a palace, covering an area of 1 ha, a '''rabat (suburb pulular district)''' and a '''necropolis'''. The site is huge. Located on the top of a hill, it offers amazings views over the entire valley. The living quarters and fortress were separated by a narrow wadi with a bridge connecting the two parts of the city. Two ''temples'' in the shakhrestan formed the center of the urban area. The two temples contained statues and mural paintings. During the 5th and 6th centuries, no building in Panjakent was as magnificent as the two temples and even the houses of the wealthiest residents seemed rather humble compared to the two temples. The buildings were made of mud bricks and paksha. The '''residential houses''' ranged from single room buildings to large estates, reflecting the social status of their inhabitants. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the hoses of the rich dominated the architecture of the city. At the beginning of the 8th century, the spaces between the houses were converted into passageways and often covered with vaults. The houses of the rich became two-story buildings with vaults over the room on the first floor. All residential houses were covered with wall paintings and woodcarvings. The larger houses consisted of ''halls'' with four columns and benches along the walls. They were the most important part of the houses and served religious purposes. More than a third of the hoses had such ''reception halls''. It is here where the archeologists discovered many exceptional ''mural paintings''. These paintings date from the 5th to the 8th century and are considered the most important works of early medieval art in Central Asia before the arrival of Islam. Most houses had a dark vaulted room for storage and a spiral staircase leading to the living quarters in the second floor. The houses of the well-to-do population usually had a room with a fire altar and a ceremonial hall decorated with wall paintings and wood carvings. In the main hall, there was a ''niche'' up to 4 m widr opposite the entrance with giant images of tutelary gods and small pictures of the praying members of the household. The center of the hall was marked by four wooden columns which supported complex wooden structures with a dome on a square foundation on the top. The hall was decorated with woodcarvings in high relief and even with small statues of caryatids and atlantes. The most common motif of the reliefs in the ceiling were arched niches with figures of the gods, including the sun-god in his chariot. The wall paintings on the other three walls were much smaller than the gods facing the main entrance. They formed two or three friezes depicting royal feasts, hunting scenes, the heroic deeds of ''Rostam'', local heroes, amazons or persons from the Indian epic Mahabarata. The layout of the Sogdian central hall is unique. The decorations show that the Sogdian artist were familiar with the artistic and literary traditions of different cultures, as Persia, Greece and even India. The majority of the population observed some local variation of ''Zoroastrianism'', which is proved by the wide distribution of ossuary funerals and fire-altars. There is, however, some evidence of the presence of Christianity and Buddhism and eventually even of the cult of Shiva. Zoroastrianism was combined with cults of additional gods and goddesses. Not all of these deities were of Iranian origin, as can be seen from the cult of the Mesopotamian goddess Nana. The iconography of these goods can be traced back to the Hellenistic period, e.g. the image of a defeated goddess. It was also influenced by Sasanian ideas of the royal attributes of gods and observed some Hinduistic features as well. The iconography took its final form in the 5th and 6th centuries. Each household had its own divine protector, but all gods formed part of a single pantheon, as can be seen from wall paintings depicting several deities side by side. The three-headed god of the wind ''Veshparkar'', who resembles Shiva, and the four-handed ''Nana'' riding on a lion or seated on a throne in the shape of a lion can easily be recognized. Altogether, more than 20 deities can be found on small terracotta images, murals, woodcarvings and clay figurines. The images of Nana, a god sitting on a throne in the shape of a camel and of a god standing over a fallen demon are most common. * Wikipedia:Panjakent Commons:Category:Panjakent


accurate knowledge

was completely blind (blindness), some early biographers are silent about this or do not mention him as being born blind. His accurate knowledge and description of colors, as evident in his poetry, renders this assertion very doubtful. He was the court poet to the Samanid ruler Nasr II (Nasr II of Samanid) (914–943) in Bukhara, although he eventually fell out of favour; his life ended in poverty. In Panjakent there was found inscribed Sogdian alphabet, so we can suppose alphabetisation


main character''

in the area but ends differently with the main character eventually becoming a king. See Matteo Compareti's description of the murals at vitterhetsakad.se '''Penjikent''' is a city in Tajikistan. Substantially closer to Samarkand, Uzbekistan, than to Dushanbe, Penjikent is the old center of the Sogdian Empire. It lies at the entrance to Zeravshan Valley


centuries

to the steppe heritage in a campaign which spread from the Tian Shan to the Carpathian Mountains. By around 460, the Uar had taken over much of Central Eurasia from Xinjiang to the Volga River, and founded a capital at the city of Badiyan or Panjakent, near what is now Khujand, though very little is known about the area from the late 5 th to early 6 th centuries. !-- Deleted image removed: File:Muslim Expansions in 13th century

were separated by a narrow wadi with a bridge connecting the two parts of the city. Two ''temples'' in the shakhrestan formed the center of the urban area. The two temples contained statues and mural paintings. During the 5th and 6th centuries, no building in Panjakent was as magnificent as the two temples and even the houses of the wealthiest residents seemed rather humble compared to the two temples. The buildings were made of mud bricks and paksha. The '''residential houses''' ranged

from single room buildings to large estates, reflecting the social status of their inhabitants. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the hoses of the rich dominated the architecture of the city. At the beginning of the 8th century, the spaces between the houses were converted into passageways and often covered with vaults. The houses of the rich became two-story buildings with vaults over the room on the first floor. All residential houses were covered with wall paintings and woodcarvings. The larger


914

was completely blind (blindness), some early biographers are silent about this or do not mention him as being born blind. His accurate knowledge and description of colors, as evident in his poetry, renders this assertion very doubtful. He was the court poet to the Samanid ruler Nasr II (Nasr II of Samanid) (914–943) in Bukhara, although he eventually fell out of favour; his life ended in poverty. In Panjakent there was found inscribed Sogdian alphabet, so we can suppose alphabetisation


impressive

excavators here, and students from St. Petersburg willing to tell you about their work and finds. The town has another small museum with Soviet memorabilia and stuffed animals as well as impressive finds from the excavations nearby -- wall paintings from the 5th century, with faded colors but recognizable motifs and hunting scenes. You can also do excellent treks in the surrounding Fan Mountains and further up the Zeravshan Valley. Penjikent is usually visited from Samarkand as part of a tour

on goodies on the bustling market in the center of town. Since it got modernized and reorganized, it lost quite a lot of its original charm, but it will still allow an impressive vision of traditional Tadjikistan on a busy day. Note that there is another market (for clothes mainly further east (not far from to the main bus terminal). Products there are fancy and cheap, but of dubious origin and quality. *


important feature

Wikipedia:Panjakent Commons:Category:Panjakent


ruins

; ref elevation_m 996 elevation_ft postal_code_type postal_code area_code website footnotes '''Panjakent''' ( ), also spelled '''Panjikent''', '''Panjekent''', '''Panjikant''' or '''Penjikent''', is a city in the Sughd province of Tajikistan on the Zeravshan River, with a population of 33,000 (2000 census). It was once an ancient town in Sogdiana. The ruins of the old town

20090728164550 http: geocities.com panjikent archivedate 2009-07-28 It means five towns (villages). The ethnic and territorial name "Soghd Soghdian" or Sughd Sughdian was mentioned in history as early as the Iranian Achaemenid Dynasty (6th century BCE). The Achaemenids founded several city-states, as well as cities along the ancient Silk road and in the Zarafshan (Zeravshan River) valley. Image:Panjakent-ancient ruins.jpg thumb left 200px Ancient ruins, near

ancient ruins of the old city, particularly the city architecture and works of art remain today. thumb right The Rudaki Tomb of Panjakent (File:Rudaki Tomb in Panjkent-after restored.jpg) According to Arab geographers, Panjakent in the 10th century had a formal Friday mosque that distinguished the place as a town from a village. It was the easternmost city of Soghd, and became well known for its walnuts.

Panjakent

'''Panjakent''' ( ), also spelled '''Panjikent''', '''Panjekent''', '''Panjikant''' or '''Penjikent''', is a city in the Sughd province of Tajikistan on the Zeravshan River, with a population of 33,000 (2000 census). It was once an ancient town in Sogdiana. The ruins of the old town are on the outskirts of the modern city. The Sarazm Important Bird Area lies downstream of the city on the tugay-vegetated floodplain of the river.

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