Palatinate-Neuburg

What is Palatinate-Neuburg known for?


called+young

-called ''Young Palatinate'') to Wolfgang of Pfalz-Zweibrücken. The eldest son of Wolfgang, Philipp Louis, founded in 1569 the ''elder line of Pfalz-Zweibrücken-Neuburg'', from which the Palatinate-Sulzbach lineage was separated in 1614. Pfalz-Neuburg joined the Protestant Union in 1608. In 1800, the Duchy was invaded by the France (French First Republic) and on June 26, 1800, the Habsburg, Württemberg (Duchy of Württemberg) and Bavarian (Electorate of Bavaria) armies fought a battle (Battle of Neuburg (1800)) there. After fighting for most of a day, the Coalition armies withdrew. Neuburg was occupied by the French, and General Ney established his headquarters in the castle there. Marceau, p 105. The Duchy of Pfalz-Neuburg was abolished in 1808. In the partition of Bavaria in 1837 Pfalz-Neuburg was joined with Swabia but became a part of Upper Bavaria in the 1970s. Dukes of Palatinate-Neuburg * Two brothers, first under regency of Frederick II, Elector Palatine ** Otto Henry (Otto Henry, Elector Palatine), 1505–59 (Elector Palatine from 1556) ** Philipp (Philip, Count Palatine), 1505–41 House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Neuburg * Wolfgang (Wolfgang of Pfalz-Zweibrücken), 1559–69 * Philipp Ludwig (Philipp Ludwig of Pfalz-Neuburg), 1569–1614 * Wolfgang Wilhelm (Wolfgang Wilhelm of Pfalz-Neuburg), 1614–53 * Philip William (Philip William, Elector Palatine), 1653–90 (also Elector Palatine from 1685) * Johann Wilhelm (Johann Wilhelm, Elector Palatine), 1690–1716 (Elector Palatine from 1690) * Charles Philip (Charles III Philip, Elector Palatine), 1716–42 (Elector Palatine from 1716) With the death of Elector Charles Philip in 1742 all his territories including the state of Palatinate-Neuburg passed to the Palatinate-Sulzbach line of the Wittelsbach dynasty. Charles Theodor of the Sulzbach line was a descendant of Augustus, Count Palatine of Sulzbach, a brother of Wolfgang Wilhelm. House of Palatinate-Sulzbach * Charles Theodore (Charles Theodore, Elector of Bavaria), 1742–99 (Elector Palatine from 1742, Elector of Bavaria from 1777) House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld *Maximilian Joseph (Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria), 1799-1808, (Elector of Bavaria from 1799) See also * Palatinate (Palatinate (disambiguation)) References in Alsace) was purchased from the Electoral Palatinate. Count Palatine Wolfgang dissolved the monasteries in his territory and thereby increased his revenues and acquired the territory of Disibodenberg Abbey. In 1557, he inherited Palatinate-Neuburg, half of the Rear County of Sponheim and half of the Lordship of Guttenberg from the Palatinate under the Treaty of Heidelberg; this more than doubled his territory. In 1558, he dissolved Hornbach Abbey an took its territory and half the County of Molsheim. In 1559, the Electoral line died out and Wolfgang inherited a share in the Front County of Sponheim. He used these large gains to give each of his five sons some territory: the sovereign Palatinate-Neuburg and Palatinate-Zweibrücken, which fell to John I's second son in 1569, and the non-sovereign collateral lines Palatinate-Sulzbach, Palatinate-Vohenstrauß-Parkstein (Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Vohenstrauss-Parkstein) and Palatinate-Birkenfeld. Biography He was the only son of Louis II, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken and his wife Elisabeth of Hesse (Elisabeth of Hesse (1503–1563)), daughter of William I, Landgrave of Hesse. His father died in 1532, so the regency of Palatinate-Zweibrücken passed to Louis' younger brother Rupert (Rupert, Count Palatine of Veldenz) until 1543. In 1557 Wolfgang received the territory of Palatinate-Neuburg in accordance with the Contract of Heidelberg. In 1548 the Holy Roman Emperor (Holy Roman Empire) Charles V (Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor) occupied his Protestant (Protestantism) territories and reintroduced Catholic practices. This imposition ended in 1552. The Peace of Augsburg of 1555 ended the religious conflict, and in 1557 several ecclesiastical states in Germany were secularised (secularisation), a few of which Wolfgang obtained. In 1566 he served as a cavalry officer in the Turkish Wars (Ottoman wars in Europe). After his death Wolfgangs land was split for his five sons who then created three branches: Philip Louis (House of Palatinate-Neuburg (Palatinate-Neuburg)), John (House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken (Palatinate-Zweibrücken)) and Charles (House of Palatinate-Birkenfeld). Otto Henry and Frederick had no surviving sons.


set small

of Palatinate-Neuburg. At war against the allied European powers, France's war council decided to destroy all fortifications and to lay waste to the Palatinate (''Brûlez le Palatinat!''), in order to prevent an enemy attack from this area. As the French withdrew from the castle on 2 March 1689, they set fire to it and blew the front off the Fat Tower. Portions of the town were also burned, but the mercy of a French general, René de Froulay de Tessé, who told the townspeople to set small fires in their homes to create smoke and the illusion of burning prevented wider destruction. Harry B. Davis: "What Happened in Heidelberg: From Heidelberg Man to the Present": Verlag Brausdruck GmbH, 1977, ISBN 0007C650K. in Alsace) was purchased from the Electoral Palatinate. Count Palatine Wolfgang dissolved the monasteries in his territory and thereby increased his revenues and acquired the territory of Disibodenberg Abbey. In 1557, he inherited Palatinate-Neuburg, half of the Rear County of Sponheim and half of the Lordship of Guttenberg from the Palatinate under the Treaty of Heidelberg; this more than doubled his territory. In 1558, he dissolved Hornbach Abbey an took its territory and half the County of Molsheim. In 1559, the Electoral line died out and Wolfgang inherited a share in the Front County of Sponheim. He used these large gains to give each of his five sons some territory: the sovereign Palatinate-Neuburg and Palatinate-Zweibrücken, which fell to John I's second son in 1569, and the non-sovereign collateral lines Palatinate-Sulzbach, Palatinate-Vohenstrauß-Parkstein (Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Vohenstrauss-Parkstein) and Palatinate-Birkenfeld. Biography He was the only son of Louis II, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken and his wife Elisabeth of Hesse (Elisabeth of Hesse (1503–1563)), daughter of William I, Landgrave of Hesse. His father died in 1532, so the regency of Palatinate-Zweibrücken passed to Louis' younger brother Rupert (Rupert, Count Palatine of Veldenz) until 1543. In 1557 Wolfgang received the territory of Palatinate-Neuburg in accordance with the Contract of Heidelberg. In 1548 the Holy Roman Emperor (Holy Roman Empire) Charles V (Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor) occupied his Protestant (Protestantism) territories and reintroduced Catholic practices. This imposition ended in 1552. The Peace of Augsburg of 1555 ended the religious conflict, and in 1557 several ecclesiastical states in Germany were secularised (secularisation), a few of which Wolfgang obtained. In 1566 he served as a cavalry officer in the Turkish Wars (Ottoman wars in Europe). After his death Wolfgangs land was split for his five sons who then created three branches: Philip Louis (House of Palatinate-Neuburg (Palatinate-Neuburg)), John (House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken (Palatinate-Zweibrücken)) and Charles (House of Palatinate-Birkenfeld). Otto Henry and Frederick had no surviving sons.


drawing

-Neuburg ''' - Otto Henry (Otto Henry, Elector Palatine), Count Palatinate of Neuburg (1505–1559) *'''Oettingen-Oettingen (House of Oettingen-Oettingen)''' - Wolfgang I (Wolfgang I of Oettingen), Count of Oettingen-Oettingen (1467–1522) The Allied commanders now marched to Friedberg (Friedberg, Bavaria), watching their enemy across the river Lech in Augsburg whilst preventing them from entering Bavaria or drawing from it any supplies. But the transfer of Bavaria from the party of the Two

are or have been attributed to him. The works that can with certainty be ascribed to his own brush are remarkable for their sincerity, severe drawing and harmonious color, but comparatively few of the two thousand or more portraits that bear his name are wholly his own handiwork. So great was his reputation that he was patronized by royalty in many countries and acquired great wealth. The king of Sweden and the count palatine of Palatinate-Neuburg Neuburg


portrait painting

in The Hague in 1625. RKD entry on Mierevelt Devoting himself first to still lifes, he eventually took up portraiture (portrait painting), in which he achieved such success that the many commissions entrusted to him necessitated the employment of numerous assistants, by whom hundreds of portraits were turned out in factory fashion. Today over 500 paintings are or have been attributed to him. The works that can with certainty be ascribed to his own brush are remarkable for their sincerity, severe drawing and harmonious color, but comparatively few of the two thousand or more portraits that bear his name are wholly his own handiwork. So great was his reputation that he was patronized by royalty in many countries and acquired great wealth. The king of Sweden and the count palatine of Neuburg (Palatinate-Neuburg) presented him with golden chains; Albert VII, Archduke of Austria, at whose court he lived in Delft, in Alsace) was purchased from the Electoral Palatinate. Count Palatine Wolfgang dissolved the monasteries in his territory and thereby increased his revenues and acquired the territory of Disibodenberg Abbey. In 1557, he inherited Palatinate-Neuburg, half of the Rear County of Sponheim and half of the Lordship of Guttenberg from the Palatinate under the Treaty of Heidelberg; this more than doubled his territory. In 1558, he dissolved Hornbach Abbey an took its territory and half the County of Molsheim. In 1559, the Electoral line died out and Wolfgang inherited a share in the Front County of Sponheim. He used these large gains to give each of his five sons some territory: the sovereign Palatinate-Neuburg and Palatinate-Zweibrücken, which fell to John I's second son in 1569, and the non-sovereign collateral lines Palatinate-Sulzbach, Palatinate-Vohenstrauß-Parkstein (Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Vohenstrauss-Parkstein) and Palatinate-Birkenfeld. Biography He was the only son of Louis II, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken and his wife Elisabeth of Hesse (Elisabeth of Hesse (1503–1563)), daughter of William I, Landgrave of Hesse. His father died in 1532, so the regency of Palatinate-Zweibrücken passed to Louis' younger brother Rupert (Rupert, Count Palatine of Veldenz) until 1543. In 1557 Wolfgang received the territory of Palatinate-Neuburg in accordance with the Contract of Heidelberg. In 1548 the Holy Roman Emperor (Holy Roman Empire) Charles V (Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor) occupied his Protestant (Protestantism) territories and reintroduced Catholic practices. This imposition ended in 1552. The Peace of Augsburg of 1555 ended the religious conflict, and in 1557 several ecclesiastical states in Germany were secularised (secularisation), a few of which Wolfgang obtained. In 1566 he served as a cavalry officer in the Turkish Wars (Ottoman wars in Europe). After his death Wolfgangs land was split for his five sons who then created three branches: Philip Louis (House of Palatinate-Neuburg (Palatinate-Neuburg)), John (House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken (Palatinate-Zweibrücken)) and Charles (House of Palatinate-Birkenfeld). Otto Henry and Frederick had no surviving sons.


family line

the direction of the architect Alessandro Pasqualini. The citadel of Jülich was later visited by the French military engineer Sébastien le Prestre de Vauban (Vauban) and was rated exemplary. After the ducal family line was extinguished in 1609, the Duchy of Jülich was divided. In 1620 it was occupied by the Dutch Republic until the Spanish took (Siege of Jülich) the fortress after five months of siege. The city later belonged to Palatinate-Neuburg, then the Electoral Palatinate


portraits

in The Hague in 1625. RKD entry on Mierevelt Devoting himself first to still lifes, he eventually took up portraiture (portrait painting), in which he achieved such success that the many commissions entrusted to him necessitated the employment of numerous assistants, by whom hundreds of portraits were turned out in factory fashion. Today over 500 paintings

are or have been attributed to him. The works that can with certainty be ascribed to his own brush are remarkable for their sincerity, severe drawing and harmonious color, but comparatively few of the two thousand or more portraits that bear his name are wholly his own handiwork. So great was his reputation that he was patronized by royalty in many countries and acquired great wealth. The king of Sweden and the count palatine of Palatinate-Neuburg Neuburg


alsace

Ruper (Rupert, Count Palatine of Veldenz) of Veldenz. In 1544, the cadet branch of Palatinate-Veldenz split off. In 1553, the County of Lützelstein (now in Alsace) was purchased from the Electoral Palatinate. Count Palatine Wolfgang dissolved the monasteries in his territory and thereby increased his revenues and acquired the territory of Disibodenberg Abbey. In 1557, he inherited Palatinate-Neuburg, half of the Rear County of Sponheim

of Palatinate-Veldenz split off. In 1553, the County of Lützelstein (now in Alsace) was purchased from the Electoral Palatinate. Count Palatine Wolfgang dissolved the monasteries in his territory and thereby increased his revenues and acquired the territory of Disibodenberg Abbey. In 1557, he inherited Palatinate-Neuburg, half of the Rear County of Sponheim and half of the Lordship of Guttenberg from the Palatinate under the Treaty of Heidelberg


468

the provisions of the Peace of Westphalia by invading Jülich-Berg (United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg), bordering his possessions in Cleves-Mark (Duchy of Cleves) at the lower Rhine river. Gabel (1998), p. 468 The Treaty of Xanten, which had ended the War of the Jülich succession between Brandenburg and the count palatines in 1614, had partitioned the once united Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg among the bellingerents, and Jülich-Berg

Palatinate-Neuburg

'''Palatinate-Neuburg''' ( ) is a former territory of the Holy Roman Empire, founded in 1505 by a branch of the House of Wittelsbach. Its capital was Neuburg an der Donau. Its area was about 2,750 km², with a population of some 100,000.

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