Osh

What is Osh known for?


good service

, chicken and beef burritos. Indoor and outdoor dining areas, with toys for kiddies. Good service, clean. They brew their own beer, the vats are visible from the dining room in a large area next door. Drink Sleep thumbnail Sulayman Too, Mt.Sulayman (File:Osh 7.JPG) *


attitude

. Similarly communications between Bishkek and Osh pass through difficult mountainous country and are endangered by the attitude of President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan. Ethnic tensions also flared at one stage, most notably in the town of Uzgen, near Osh, where were Uzbek-Kyrgyz riots in 1990 (Osh riots (1990)). There has been no further ethnic violence, and things appeared to have quietened down for several years. Weisbrode, K. (2001) ''Central Eurasia -- Prize or Quicksand

by the attitude of President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan. Ethnic tensions also flared at one stage, most notably in the town of Uzgen, near Osh, where were Uzbek-Kyrgyz riots in 1990 (Osh riots (1990)). There has been no further ethnic violence, and things appeared to have quietened down for several years. Weisbrode, K. (2001) ''Central Eurasia -- Prize or Quicksand?'' Oxford University Press, pp 46-48. However, the valley is a religiously conservative region which


population starting

both delicious and healthy by the local population. Starting out as a worker at a tobacco factory in his hometown of Osh in the south, Erkinbayev made his fame as a wrestler, and served in parliament for a decade. He went on to own "Kara Suu", Central Asia’s largest bazaar. Early life Qutbuddin Bakhtiyar Kaki was born in 569 A.H. (1173 C.E.) in a small town called Aush (alternatively Awash or Ush) in the Fergana Valley (present Osh in southern Kyrgyz Republic, part of historic Transoxania). According to his biography mentioned in, ''Ain-i-Akbari'', written in 16th century by Mughal Emperor Akbar’s vizier, Abu'l-Fazl ibn Mubarak, he was the son of Kamalu'ddin Musa, whom he lost at the young age of a year and a half. Kutbu'ddin Bakhtyar Kaki ''Ain-e-Akbari'' by Abul Faza (Abu'l-Fazl ibn Mubarak), English translation, by '' H. Blochmann'' and ''Colonel H. S. Jarrett'', 1873–1907. The Asiatic Society of Bengal, Calcutta., Volume III, Saints of India. (Awliyá-i-Hind), Page 363. ''Islamic Thought and Movements in the Subcontinent'', 711-1947'', by Syed Moinul Haq. Published by Historical Society, 1979. ''Page 144''. ''Tabakat-i-Nasiri. A General History of the Muhammadan Dynasties of Asia, Including Hindustan, from A. H. 194 (810 A.D.) to A. H. 658 (1260 A.D.) and the Irruption of the Infidel Mughals into Islam''. Translated from Original Persian Manuscripts by Major H. By Abu-'Umar-i-'Usman. Published by Adamant Media Corporation. ISBN 1-4021-7110-2. ''Page 921''. '''Kyzyl-Kiya''' (


gangs

and Uzbeks got killed and destroyed over 2000 buildings, mostly homes, and deepened the gulf between the country’s ethnic Kyrgyz and Uzbeks." Local media reported that gangs of young men armed with sticks and stones smashed shop windows

June 2010 The Kyrgyz intelligence agency claimed that the 2010 violence was initiated by the just-deposed president, Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who is said to have made a deal with foreign narco-jihadist gangs: jihadists take over southern Kyrgyzstan and initiate a shariah state in exchange for the Bakiyev family's being returned to controlling Bishkek. http: wsinform.com world Bishkek-obvinil-Bakieva-v-finansirovanii-popytki-gosperevorota However, to the day


great game

(Category:Osh) Category:Populated places in Osh Province Category:Regions of Kyrgyzstan Category:Populated places along the Silk Road Category:Kyrgyzstan–Uzbekistan border crossings Category:Populated places in Kyrgyzstan There are vague plans about extending rail lines from Balykchy in the north and or from Osh in the south into the People's Republic of China, but the cost of construction would be enormous. thumb Most of the intercity travelers having switched from the big state-run buses to minivans, the palatial halls of Bishkek's West Bus Terminal remain mostly deserted (Image:E8103-Bishkek-West-Bus-Terminal.jpg) With support from the Asian Development Bank, a major road linking the north and southwest from Bishkek to Osh has recently been completed. This considerably eases communication between the two major population centers of the country—the Chui Valley in the north and the Fergana Valley in the South. An offshoot of this road branches off across a 3,500 meter pass (mountain pass) into the Talas Valley in the northwest. Plans are now being formulated to build a major road from Osh into the People's Republic of China. Army The Army of Kyrgyzstan includes the 1st Motor Rifle Brigade (Mountain) at Osh, a brigade at Koy-Tash, in the Bishkek area, the 25th Special Forces Brigade, independent battalions at Karakol and Naryn, a brigade at Balykchi, and other units. Uzbekistan dominates southern Kyrgyzstan both economically and politically, based on the large Uzbek population in that region of Kyrgyzstan and on economic and geographic conditions. Much of Kyrgyzstan depends entirely on Uzbekistan for natural gas; on several occasions, Karimov has achieved political ends by shutting pipelines (Pipeline transport) or by adjusting terms of delivery. In a number of television appearances broadcast in the Osh and Jalal-Abad provinces of Kyrgyzstan, Karimov has addressed Akayev with considerable condescension; Akayev, in turn, has been highly deferential to his much stronger neighbor. Although Uzbekistan has not shown overt expansionist tendencies, the Kyrgyz government is acutely aware of the implications of Karimov's assertions that he is responsible for the well-being of all Uzbeks, regardless of their nation of residence. Tajikistan has an estimated 30,000 kilometers of roads, nearly all of which were built before 1991. One main north-south artery runs across the mountains between the northwestern city of Khujand and Dushanbe. A second main artery runs east from Dushanbe to Khorog in the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province


causing

to cotton production on a massive scale and the over-arching political structures meant that crossing borders was not a problem. Since 1991 this has changed, for the worse. Uzbekistan regularly closes its borders with Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, causing immense difficulties for trade and for those who live in the region. Travellers from Khujand to Dushanbe, unable to take the route through Uzbekistan, have to cross a high mountain pass between the two cities instead, along a terrible road

during clashes in Osh and Jalal-Abad, and 2000 more were injured. http: www.un.org apps news story.asp?NewsID 35071&Cr Kyrgyz&Cr1 Between 100,000 and 300,000 refugees, predominantly of Uzbek ethnic origin, attempted to flee to Uzbekistan, causing a major humanitarian crisis. The Soviet and post-Soviet periods In 1924 the new boundaries separating the Uzbek SSR and Kyrgyz SSR cut off the eastern end of the Ferghana Valley, as well as the slopes

was not a problem. Since 1991 this has changed, for the worse. Uzbekistan regularly closes its borders with Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, causing immense difficulties for trade and for those who live in the region. Travellers from Khujand to Dushanbe, unable to take the route through Uzbekistan, have to cross a high mountain pass between the two cities instead, along a terrible road. Similarly communications between Bishkek and Osh pass through difficult mountainous country and are endangered


black water

'''Kara-Suu''' (meaning "Black Water") is a town, river and valley in Osh Province, Kyrgyzstan, in the Fergana Valley. The town is 23km northeast of Osh and is the capital of Kara-Suu District. '''Mario Biondi''' (Milan, 17 May 1939) is an Italian writer, poet, literary critic, journalist and translator. His reputation is mainly due to the novel ''Gli occhi di una donna'', which earned him the important Italian award Premio Campiello in 1985. He has a keen interest in Central Asia and Tibetan history and culture, and in recent years has travelled all of the Silk Road through Turkey, Iran, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan and many provinces of China, among which Gansu, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Qinghai and obviously Xizang (Tibet). thumb Mario Biondi in Ferghana Valley (Osh (Image:biondi.ferghana.big.jpeg) - Kyrgyzstan), July 2004. '''Tursunbai Bakir Uulu''' (born March 17, 1958 in Kara-Suu, Osh Oblast) is a Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan) politician, former ombudsman and presidential (Kyrgyz presidential election, 2005) candidate.


massive scale

to cotton production on a massive scale and the over-arching political structures meant that crossing borders was not a problem. Since 1991 this has changed, for the worse. Uzbekistan regularly closes its borders with Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, causing immense difficulties for trade and for those who live in the region. Travellers from Khujand to Dushanbe, unable to take the route through Uzbekistan, have to cross a high mountain pass between the two cities instead, along a terrible road. Similarly communications between Bishkek and Osh pass through difficult mountainous country and are endangered by the attitude of President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan. Ethnic tensions also flared at one stage, most notably in the town of Uzgen, near Osh, where were Uzbek-Kyrgyz riots in 1990 (Osh riots (1990)). There has been no further ethnic violence, and things appeared to have quietened down for several years. Weisbrode, K. (2001) ''Central Eurasia -- Prize or Quicksand?'' Oxford University Press, pp 46-48. However, the valley is a religiously conservative region which was particularly hard-hit by President Karimov's secularization legislation in Uzbekistan, together with his decision to close the borders with Kyrgyzstan in 2003. This devastated the local economy by preventing the importation of cheap Chinese consumer goods. The deposition of Askar Akayev in Kyrgyzstan in April 2005, coupled with the arrest of a group of prominent local businessmen brought underlying tensions to a boil in the region around Andijan and Qorasuv during the May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan in which hundreds of protestors were killed by troops. Violence started to pick up again in 2010 in Kyrgyz part of the valley, heated by ethnic tensions, worsening economic conditions due to the global economic crisis, and political conflict over ousting of Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev in April 2010. In June 2010, about 200 people have been reported to be killed during clashes in Osh and Jalal-Abad, and 2000 more were injured. http: www.un.org apps news story.asp?NewsID 35071&Cr Kyrgyz&Cr1 Between 100,000 and 300,000 refugees, predominantly of Uzbek ethnic origin, attempted to flee to Uzbekistan, causing a major humanitarian crisis. The Soviet and post-Soviet periods In 1924 the new boundaries separating the Uzbek SSR and Kyrgyz SSR cut off the eastern end of the Ferghana Valley, as well as the slopes surrounding it. This was compounded in 1928 when the Tajik ASSR became a fully-fledged republic, and the area around Khujand was made a part of it. This blocked the valley's natural outlet and the routes to Samarkand and Bukhara, but none of these borders was of any great significance so long as Soviet rule lasted. The whole region was part of a single economy geared to cotton production on a massive scale and the over-arching political structures meant that crossing borders was not a problem. Since 1991 this has changed, for the worse. Uzbekistan regularly closes its borders with Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, causing immense difficulties for trade and for those who live in the region. Travellers from Khujand to Dushanbe, unable to take the route through Uzbekistan, have to cross a high mountain pass between the two cities instead, along a terrible road. Similarly communications between Bishkek and Osh pass through difficult mountainous country and are endangered by the attitude of President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan. Ethnic tensions also flared at one stage, most notably in the town of Uzgen, near Osh, where were Uzbek-Kyrgyz riots in 1990 (Osh riots (1990)). There has been no further ethnic violence, and things appeared to have quietened down for several years. Weisbrode, K. (2001) ''Central Eurasia -- Prize or Quicksand?'' Oxford University Press, pp 46-48. However, the valley is a religiously conservative region which was particularly hard-hit by President Karimov's secularization legislation in Uzbekistan, together with his decision to close the borders with Kyrgyzstan in 2003. This devastated the local economy by preventing the importation of cheap Chinese consumer goods. The deposition of Askar Akayev in Kyrgyzstan in April 2005, coupled with the arrest of a group of prominent local businessmen brought underlying tensions to a boil in the region around Andijan and Qorasuv during the May 2005 unrest in Uzbekistan in which hundreds of protestors were killed by troops. Violence started to pick up again in 2010 in Kyrgyz part of the valley, heated by ethnic tensions, worsening economic conditions due to the global economic crisis, and political conflict over ousting of Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev in April 2010. In June 2010, about 200 people have been reported to be killed during clashes in Osh and Jalal-Abad, and 2000 more were injured. http: www.un.org apps news story.asp?NewsID 35071&Cr Kyrgyz&Cr1 Between 100,000 and 300,000 refugees, predominantly of Uzbek ethnic origin, attempted to flee to Uzbekistan, causing a major humanitarian crisis. Until Soviet times and the construction of the Pamir Highway from Osh to Khorog in the 1920s the routes to Kashgaria and the Pamirs were mere bridle-paths over the mountains, crossing them by lofty passes (mountain pass). For instance, the passes of Kara-kazyk, 4,389 m (14,400 ft) and Tenghiz-bai 3,413 m (11,200 ft), both passable all the year round, lead from Marghelan to Karateghin and the Pamirs, while Kashgar is reached via Osh and Gulcha, and then over the passes of Terek-davan, 3,720 m (12,205 ft); (open all the year round), Taldyk, 3,505 m (11,500 ft), Archat, 3,536 m (11,600 ft), and Shart-davan, 4,267 m (14,000 ft). Other passes leading out of the valley are the Jiptyk, 3,798 m (12,460 ft), S. of Kokand; the Isfairam, 3,657 m (12,000 ft), leading to the glen of the Surkhab (Vakhsh River), and the Kavuk, 3,962 m (13,000 ft), across the Alai Mts. Until Soviet times and the construction of the Pamir Highway from Osh to Khorog in the 1920s the routes to Kashgaria and the Pamirs were mere bridle-paths over the mountains, crossing them by lofty passes (mountain pass). For instance, the passes of Kara-kazyk, 4,389 m (14,400 ft) and Tenghiz-bai 3,413 m (11,200 ft), both passable all the year round, lead from Marghelan to Karateghin and the Pamirs, while Kashgar is reached via Osh and Gulcha, and then over the passes of Terek-davan, 3,720 m (12,205 ft); (open all the year round), Taldyk, 3,505 m (11,500 ft), Archat, 3,536 m (11,600 ft), and Shart-davan, 4,267 m (14,000 ft). Other passes leading out of the valley are the Jiptyk, 3,798 m (12,460 ft), S. of Kokand; the Isfairam, 3,657 m (12,000 ft), leading to the glen of the Surkhab (Vakhsh River), and the Kavuk, 3,962 m (13,000 ft), across the Alai Mts. Administrative divisions In 1911 the province was divided into five districts, the chief towns of which were Fergana (New Marghelan (Fergana)), capital of the province (8,977 inhabitants in 1897), Andijan (49,682 in 1900), Kokand (86,704 in 1900), Namangan (61,906 in 1897), and Osh (37,397 in 1900); but Old Marghelan (Marghelan) (42,855 in 1900) and Chust (Chust, Uzbekistan) (13,686 in 1897) were also towns of importance. Later that year the IMU conducted its first verifiable operations, with an incursion into the Batken region of southern Kyrgyzstan - a region populated mainly by ethnic Uzbeks, and lying between Tavildara in Tajikistan and the Fergana Valley in Uzbekistan. Insurgents seized the Mayor of Osh (the regional capital) and successfully extorted a ransom from the ill-prepared Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan) government in Bishkek, as well as a helicopter to transport them to Afghanistan. Further incursions into Batken followed, with one raid seeing a number of Japanese geologists kidnapped - although denied by Japan, their subsequent release almost certainly followed a significant ransom payment. The results of the elections were disputed, with allegations of vote-rigging. Two of Akayev's children won seats. Serious protests broke out in Osh and Jalal-Abad, with protesters occupying administration buildings and the Osh airport. The government declared that it was ready to negotiate with the demonstrators. However an opposition leader said talks would only be worthwhile if the President himself took part. - Osh Oш Osh (Osh Province) 208,520 city - Transportation The Pamir Highway, the world's second highest international road, runs from Dushanbe in Tajikistan to Osh in Kyrgyzstan through the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province, and is the isolated region's main supply route. The Great Silk Road crossed a number of Pamir Mountain ranges.


work radio

to the nation's struggling economy. On May 13, 2010, Bakiyev supporters took over government buildings in Osh, and also seized the airport, preventing interim government officials from landing. The protesters demanded


48'A=0

area_metro_km2 area_metro_sq_mi population_as_of 2012 population_footnotes population_total 255,900 population_urban population_metro population_density_sq_mi population_density_km2 timezone utc_offset timezone_DST utc_offset_DST latd 40 latm 31 lats 48 latNS N longd 72 longm 48 longs 0 longEW E elevation_footnotes elevation_m elevation_ft postal_code_type postal_code area_code website http: oshcity.kg footnotes '''Osh

Osh

'''Osh''' ( ) is the second largest city in Kyrgyzstan, located in the Fergana Valley in the south of the country and often referred to as the "capital of the south". The city is at least 3,000 years old, and has served as the administrative center of Osh Province since 1939. The city has an ethnically mixed population of about 255,800 (in 2012), comprising Kyrgyz (Kyrgyz people), Uzbeks, Russians, Tajiks (Tājik people), and other smaller ethnic groups.

It is the most ancient city of Kyrgyzstan and is estimated to be more than 3000 years old.

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