Orono, Maine

What is Orono, Maine known for?


quot album

with Frank Sinatra on his "Trilogy" album, in which they sang a version of the country music hit "For the Good Times". This introduced her to a new group of fans, especially Sinatra expert Charles Fasciano, who considered this song his personal favorite. She published a memoir, ''Can't Help Singing,'' in 1999. In the 19th century the river was a conduit for the transport of logs (logging) from the northern woods (Great North Woods), to be sawn into lumber


years

with no wife present, and 56.6% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.77. The median age in the town was 21.8 years. 8.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 55.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 12.2% were from 25 to 44; 13.1% were from 45 to 64; and 10.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town

race were 1.21% of the population. There were 2,691 households out of which 21.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples (Marriage) living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.0% were non-families. 31.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.81. In the town

the population was spread out with 11.9% under the age of 18, 47.9% from 18 to 24, 17.1% from 25 to 44, 13.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females there were 102.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.1 males. The median income for a household in the town was $30,619, and the median income for a family was $52,714. Males had a median income of $35,923 versus


family history

forefathers. His younger siblings include: Livonia (b. Jan. 1810), Jesse (b. 3 Jun. 1812), Nancy Gaubert Norcross (b. 2 Mar. 1816); who married Moses M. Swan, of Augustus, ME; Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine. 1909, Vol. 3, p. 1380. Maria (b. Feb. 1818), and Louisa (b. Oct. 1823). Education Cuffe attended the Children's House Montessori School in Stillorgan, Gonzaga College in Ranelagh, the University of Maine at Orono (Orono, Maine), University College Dublin, and the University of Venice. He has degrees in architecture and town planning from University College Dublin. He lectured in urban planning at the Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street. '''Alfond Arena''' is a 5,124-seat multi-purpose arena in Orono, Maine, USA. The arena opened in 1977. It is home to the University of Maine Black Bears (Maine Black Bears) ice hockey and basketball teams. It is recognizable for its distinctive hyperbolic parabloid architecture. The multi-angular roof design can also be found at Pavilion (The Pavilion) at Villanova University, the Brown University Smith Swim Center and the Flynn Recreation Complex at Boston College. It was expanded from its original capacity of 3,800 in 1992 in order to accommodate more spectators and bring the basketball team back from its temporary home at the Bangor Auditorium. More skyboxes have been added since then, so the arena's capacity has been reduced. A new Daktronics ProStar scoreboard was installed during the summer of 2008. It is named for Harold Alfond, a longtime Maine booster, whose name also adorns Alfond Stadium (Alfond Stadium (University of Maine)), the school's main outdoor stadium. On November 13, 1961, WCBB-TV signed on from Lewiston (Lewiston, Maine) as the first Educational television station in Maine. It was a combined venture of Colby College, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. Looking back. (Lewiston) ''Sun-Journal'', 2006-09-13 Two years later, WMEB-TV signed on from UMaine's campus in Orono (Orono, Maine), near Bangor (Bangor, Maine). 1963 in History Over the next decade, UMaine signed on three other stations across the state, as well as several translators. These stations formed the original MPBN network. One of these stations was WMEA-TV in Biddeford (Biddeford, Maine), near Portland; however, it was (and still is) practically unviewable over the air in Portland itself and points north. WMEA was the flagship station for the now-defunct Maine Public Television Plus, a secondary PBS service launched in the mid-1990s. UMaine brought public radio to the state in 1970, when WMEH signed on from Bangor. Five other stations signed on over the next decade. '''WMEB-TV''' (flagship) Orono (Orono, Maine) (Bangor (Bangor, Maine)) 9 (VHF (very high frequency)) '''Cindy Lee Blodgett''' (born December 23, 1975 in Clinton (Clinton, Maine), Maine) is a former collegiate and professional basketball player. She was also the head coach at University of Maine, located in Orono, Maine from 2007 to 2011. Cindy attended Lawrence High School (Lawrence High School (Maine)) in Fairfield (Fairfield, Maine), where she was an all-star basketball player. She led the Bulldogs to a four-year career record of 84-4. Throughout that four year period they won four state class A championships. Her tremendous accolades have made her a hero across the state of Maine. June 22, 1925) was a United States Senator from North Dakota. Born in Starks, Maine, he attended the public schools and Somerset Academy (Athens, Maine) and graduated from the University of Maine at Orono (Orono, Maine) in 1884. He was a chemist of the New York State Experiment Station in Geneva, New York from 1884 to 1890 and dean of the school of chemistry and pharmacy and professor of chemistry at the North Dakota Agricultural College, Fargo, North Dakota. He was chief chemist of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station from 1890 to 1916 and editor of the ''North Dakota Farmer'' at Lisbon (Lisbon, North Dakota) from 1899 to 1904. He was administrator of the State's pure-food laws, for which he actively crusaded from 1902 to 1921; he was also president of the North Dakota Agricultural College from 1916 to 1921.


music hit

with Frank Sinatra on his "Trilogy" album, in which they sang a version of the country music hit "For the Good Times". This introduced her to a new group of fans, especially Sinatra expert Charles Fasciano, who considered this song his personal favorite. She published a memoir, ''Can't Help Singing,'' in 1999. In the 19th century the river was a conduit for the transport of logs (logging) from the northern woods (Great North Woods), to be sawn into lumber at mills around Old Town (Old Town, Maine) and Orono (Orono, Maine), and transported on ships from Bangor, at the head of tide. (The average high tide at Bangor is June 22, 1925) was a United States Senator from North Dakota. Born in Starks, Maine, he attended the public schools and Somerset Academy (Athens, Maine) and graduated from the University of Maine at Orono (Orono, Maine) in 1884. He was a chemist of the New York State Experiment Station in Geneva, New York from 1884 to 1890 and dean of the school of chemistry and pharmacy and professor of chemistry at the North Dakota Agricultural College, Fargo, North Dakota. He was chief chemist of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station from 1890 to 1916 and editor of the ''North Dakota Farmer'' at Lisbon (Lisbon, North Dakota) from 1899 to 1904. He was administrator of the State's pure-food laws, for which he actively crusaded from 1902 to 1921; he was also president of the North Dakota Agricultural College from 1916 to 1921.


editing

schools in Maine. He attended the University of Maine at Orono (Orono, Maine) until 1918. From 1918 he held a variety of jobs, including teaching, newspaper editing, business and state government. He was an instructor at Sanderson Academy, Ashfield, Massachusetts from 1918 to 1919. He was a member of the extension staff of the University of New Hampshire at Durham (Durham, New Hampshire) from 1921 until 1922. He was the secretary of the New Hampshire Farm Bureau


theory+supporting

the Hungarians between the 5th-10th centuries has a long story and it is connected with the ambition of the Slovaks to reach self-determination or autonomy within Hungary (mostly under romantic nationalism of the 19th century and during the Slovak national revival (Romantic nationalism)). This continuity theory, supporting the supposed former common past of the Czech and Slovak nations (Great Moravia), thus also legitimizating the creation of the united Czechoslovakism Czechoslovak


career record

in Fairfield (Fairfield, Maine), where she was an all-star basketball player. She led the Bulldogs to a four-year career record of 84-4. Throughout that four year period they won four state class A championships. Her tremendous accolades have made her a hero across the state of Maine.


editing business

schools in Maine. He attended the University of Maine at Orono (Orono, Maine) until 1918. From 1918 he held a variety of jobs, including teaching, newspaper editing, business and state government. He was an instructor at Sanderson Academy, Ashfield, Massachusetts from 1918 to 1919. He was a member of the extension staff of the University of New Hampshire at Durham (Durham, New Hampshire) from 1921 until 1922. He was the secretary of the New Hampshire Farm Bureau


romantic

the Hungarians between the 5th-10th centuries has a long story and it is connected with the ambition of the Slovaks to reach self-determination or autonomy within Hungary (mostly under romantic nationalism of the 19th century and during the Slovak national revival (Romantic nationalism)). This continuity theory, supporting the supposed former common past of the Czech and Slovak nations (Great Moravia), thus also legitimizating the creation of the united Czechoslovakism Czechoslovak


public research

; therefore we can identify the Slavic inhabitants living on the territory of this realm as Slovaks. The '''University of Maine''' ('''UMaine''') is a public research university located in Orono, Maine, United States. The university was established in 1865 as a land-grant university

Orono, Maine

'''Orono''' is a town (New England town) in Penobscot County (Penobscot County, Maine), Maine, United States. It was first settled in 1774 and named in honor of Chief Joseph Orono of the Penobscot Nation (Penobscot people). It is home to The University of Maine. The population was 10,362 at the 2010 census (2010 United States Census).

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